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I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato (Charlie and Lola) Paperback – September 15, 2003

4.7 out of 5 stars 106 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Lola is a very fussy eater. Carrots are for rabbits and peas are "too small and too green." One day, after rattling off her long list of despised foods, she ends with the vehement pronouncement, "And I absolutely will never not ever eat a tomato." Not convinced, Lola's older sister Charlie has an idea. She tells Lola that the orange things on the table are not carrots, but "orange twiglets from Jupiter" and peas are in fact "green drops from Greenland." Mashed potatoes, when pitched as "cloud fluff from the pointiest peak of Mount Fuji" suddenly seem appealing to Lola. And in the end, might she even eat a tomato?

Lauren Child's wacky, expressive sketches of Lola and Charlie (much like those in Clarice Bean, That's Me) are cut out and superimposed on all sorts of textures and patterns from wallpaper to wood. Fuzzy, enlarged photographs of bowls of peas, or fish sticks, or big carrots are pasted right on top to great effect. This funny, endearing look at how children's tastes can be based more on preconception than taste buds is sure to infuse levity into the daily dinner-table struggle. The author's dedication? "With love from Lauren / who is keen on Marmite / but would rather not eat a raisin." (Ages 3 to 8) --Karin Snelson --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Child (Clarice Bean, That's Me) here serves up a delectable variation on the picky-eater-themed tale. Charlie's parents give him the formidable task of feeding dinner to his fussy younger sister, Lola. The clever boy cajoles his sibling into eating foods that she insists "I do not eat." The girl lists such forbidden fruits as carrots, peas, potatoes, fish sticks andAthe most dreadedAtomatoes, all of which her brother is dishing up for the meal. "These are not carrots. These are orange twiglets from Jupiter," maintains Charlie when Lola turns up her nose. He devises similarly tempting pseudonyms for other edibles: peas are rare "green drops" from Greenland that fall from the sky; mashed potatoes are cloud fluff from "the pointiest peak of Mount Fuji." A playful arrangement of type in a variety of fonts and sizes combined with mixed-media art that overlays photos on fanciful, childlike drawings provide a feast for young readers' eyes and mimic the boy's upbeat attitude. Finally, Lola herself follows her brother's example and asks him to pass the "moonsquirters my favorite," otherwise known as guess what? Apt not to be satiated with one serving of this appetizing fare, youngsters will neverAnot everApass up a second helping. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 370L (What's this?)
  • Series: Charlie and Lola
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; Reprint edition (September 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763621803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763621803
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 0.2 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (106 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
What a cute story! Charlie is in charge of little sister Lola and decides to play a trick on her. With Charlie giving silly names to foods that Lola claims she doesn't like, Lola plays along and tastes foods she has insisted she will never, ever eat. My 6-1/2 year old loves this book; it's a bit too old for my almost 3-year old.
What I like best about this book are the real photographs of the foods (peas, carrots, fish sticks, etc.) that are incorporated into the fun cartoon illustrations.
This is a engaging, slightly offbeat story which makes it stand out from the zillions of other children's books out there.
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Format: Hardcover
Lola is a VERY picky eater. Carrots are for rabbits. Peas are too small and too green. She won't touch potatoes or mushrooms, spaghetti, eggs or sausage...the list goes on and on. And, she absolutely will never not ever eat a tomato. Her big sister Charlie has got to give her dinner and decides "to play a good trick on her." Carrots become orange twiglets from Jupiter and Lola is so intrigued that she just has to try one. Peas turn into green drops from Greenland, mashed potatoes, cloud fluff from Mt Fuji. And though Lola would never touch a fish stick, she's willing to eat an ocean nibble since mermaids eat them all the time. Pretty soon, dinner is over and Lola has eaten everything, even a nice round red moonsquirter. You know, they're her favorite. Lauren Child has written a funny, witty, imaginative story, told in hip kid-speak, all picky eaters will identify with. Her busy, expressive illustrations, full of color and textures, compliment the text and will really hold your youngster's attention. This is a terrific book the whole family can enjoy and it might even get your picky eater to try something new.
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Format: Hardcover
Ok, I was a fussy eater. I admit it. And maybe if this book had been around when I was a kid, my parents would have had an easier time. Lola has a long list of foods she won't eat but some creative thinking from her older sister changes all that.
The idea is great but it is the colorful illustrations that I love. The figures are cut outs that are placed ingeniously on all kinds of bacgrounds, lending texture and vibrance to the story. I'm definately giving this book to all the fussy eaters I know. Very imaginative and well done.
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Format: Hardcover
"I have this little sister, Lola. She is small and very funny" These opening lines set the sweet and gentle tone for a tale about two sisters. One (Lola) with a very long list of foods she will not eat, and the other (Charlie) with the task of feeding dinner to her fussy little sister.
It could be a recipe for disaster -- I'm certain this situation would have played out quite differently with me and MY little sister -- but Charlie's creativity and sense of fun save the day.
My seven-year old fussy eater nearly fell out of his chair laughing when we read this book. He clearly identified with, and enjoyed, Lola and her reasoning (for example, peas are "too small" and "too green"). While I'm pretty sure my son will not change his eating habits because of this story, it did give him a sense that he is not alone in the world with his funky tastes while reinforcing the idea that his tastes may change.
Great story, cute illustrations, good lesson.
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Format: Hardcover
It has great pictures, and the book is about a little girl named Lola who is a very fussy eater. Lola learns about fruits and vegetables. Her sister Charlie tells her that they are different things and from different places. Lola tries everything and ends up liking them all. I would suggest this book for kids under the age of 7.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased 3 picky eater books in hopes of obtaining positive motivation for a 9 year old carb and McDonald's addicted grandson. I've had him read the books to me, one per visit. This is the 3rd book he read. Charlie is older brother to Lola and he's put in charge to prepare her meal and see that she eats it. Lola is on a roll telling Charlie what she will not eat. Charlie has a creative mind, a great sense of humor, and takes his responsibility seriously. Lola refuses to eat any of her noted dislikes until Charlie corrects her idea that any is ordinary as he provides the proper other planet names for each food. The book did have a positive effect and reading the 3 has resulted in a significant improvement in his acceptance and evaluation of food.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Such a cute story. Charlie renames veggies and fruits for his sister. Carrots are "orange twiglets from Jupiter", peas are "green drops from Greenland" and so on. Then she'll eat them.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As the other reviewers say, the illustrations are wonderful with a collage of food photos and whimsical drawings. The story really drew my daughter in--she is a picky 4-year old who is not only difficult with food, but also stubborn and smart and has picked up on other attempts on my part to address the issue via books or play. This book actually captivated her (she asks for it every night), I guess because of the fantasy and imagination used by the characters around the issue of picky eating.
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