Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Disney Infinity 3.0 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 464 reviews(5 star)show all reviews
305 of 330 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2009
First, here's what this book is not: It's not your parents' money management and investing book, although as a parent I wish I had done in my twenties what Ramit Sethi tells the twenty-somethings they should be doing right now.

Ramit starts with the premise that most people are so overwhelmed by the sheer amount of financial information available that they just shut down and do nothing. So Ramit tells you exactly what to do with your money and why. Want to know whether it's smarter to pay extra on your student loans or put that money into your 401(k) instead? Ramit will tell you. Want to know some specific financial companies that offer the low-cost index funds you should invest in through your Roth IRA? Ramit will tell you. Do you not even know what the heck an index fund is? Ramit will tell you!

Ramit also tells the truth about brown bagging your lunch and curbing your latte habit; and the truth is that these actions on their own are virtually pointless. Instead, you should go after the big wins, like getting the lowest interest rate and the best price on your next car because you have impeccable credit and negotiated "like an Indian" (negotiation scripts included).

Ramit maps out exactly how to get from where you are now to where you want to be financially, including how to create a personal money management system that practically manages itself. Ramit's system starts with a no-fee checking account and an online high-interest savings account. (He even tells you which online bank he uses.) He then walks you through setting up automatic bill payments and regularly scheduled transfers to your investment accounts. Throughout, he includes easy-to-understand charts, as well as short pieces by other personal finance bloggers.

I wish I could quote some of the passages that I found especially useful or entertaining--Ramit writes with an appealing, if oddball, humor--but I have already mailed my copy of the book to my 24-year-old son, who called me last night to tell me it never would've occurred to him to ask his bank to waive an overdraft fee. (That gem is in chapter 2, I think.)

Thank you, Ramit! I hope this enthusiastic review by an "old person" will not stop the young people from buying your book!
99 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
30 of 37 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 23, 2009
In the last two weeks I've read three finance books to keep me from having a nervous breakdown every time I turned on MSNBC: 1) The WSJ Guide to the End of Wall Street by Dave Kansas; 2) Suze Orman's 2009 Action Plan, and; 3) I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit (pronounced "Ra-meet") Sethi.

Ramit's is by far the best of the three for my purposes (I'm 26, have a job, don't really know what I'm doing w/money, but I love compound interest and try not to be stupid).

This book is worth its weight in gold and here's why:

First, it's targeted to a younger demographic (guessing 18-34, aka the FOX demo), and his advice is much more detailed and specific than the other books: giving readers detailed options for setting up high interest online savings accounts; breaking down renting vs owning; showing you how to save hundreds a month without budgeting ("Budgeting is the worst word in the history of the world") but by spending consciously; figuring out how much a $250 ipod really costs when charged on a CC w/14% APR ($297), and much, much more.

Second, Ramit is very funny and tells good stories. He doesn't talk down to the reader, or say that it's not our fault that we maxed out our credit cards on DVDs and 14 subscriptions to Vibe. Instead, he tells it like it is (for example, "If you miss a credit card payment, you might as well just get a shovel and repeatedly beat yourself in the face.") He's like Dr. Phil, if Dr. Phil weren't a doctor and instead was a skinny Indian kid.

I especially appreciated Ramit's attitude about the Starbucks rule being BS, and that instead of obsessing over lattes, we should focus on the big wins like improving our credit scores. Another valuable distinction he makes is between stupid and conscious spending. Scrimp on unnecessary expenses so that you can spend lavishly, consciously and w/o guilt on the things that really matter to you (nice pens, vacations, expensive stuff for babies, etc.)

Third, this book is well-organized into a 6-week action plan. Of course, it will take more than that to get out of debt, build retirement savings, raise credit scores, etc., but the 6-week schedule will put you well on your way to achieving your financial goals, big and small.

Overall, I walked away from this book with a much clearer understanding of my spending, and a much more functional relationship with my money. My only regret is that it wasn't published sooner, so I could be compound awesome. This is a MUST for every college student, post-grad, young professional, you get the picture. Truly, one of the best, most useful books of its kind, for any generation.

[I originally wrote this review for the Kindle version -- Amazon doesn't have the link set up correctly yet, so if you want to buy on Kindle, just search for it under the "Kindle Books" category]
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
120 of 156 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2009
Ramit is part of the new round of financial savants. It is one thing to know about finance, another to be able to write about it, and another entirely to write about it in a way to motivate the younger crowd. Ramit hits the tri-fecta here.

I'm good with my money and pretty knowledgeable but am the kind of person who needs a nudge now and again. Ramit gave me that nudge (and some great tips to boot) with this book. I'm barely through chapter two and already have a savings/profit of about $860 (as I explain in the video...)

Get this book for yourself, and with the money you save, buy another copy for a teenager or college student you know and care about.
1010 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
30 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on May 16, 2009
Q: Can you learn the things that Ramit talks about in other books or even on-line? A: YES

Q: If you are already a money genius will this book help you? A: MAYBE

Q: Is this the only book you will ever need to become wealthier beyond your wildest dreams? A: NO

I'm writing this review mostly because of my frustrations with the *very few* low one star ratings on this book, I hate it when people in their one star reviews admit that the product they are reviewing is actually not that bad.

Anyway, many of the things that Ramit teaches/outlines in this book are common sense things that all of us should be doing, but either forget or never motivate ourselves to do.

The thing I like about this book is that it does not just talk about theory, but actually outlines action items and next steps. Goals without deadlines are just pipe dreams, this will inspire you to action. Within a few moments of picking this book up I started to save money, not because the book is magic, but because it made me take action and stop and look at my finances.

Even if you can only get one idea from this book that will save you more than $10-15 how can you rate it lower than 5 stars? The book is FREE to you!

Is the name misleading? MAYBE - but you have to admit, it is good marketing, it makes you take a second look. This is what ALL marketers do from the toothpaste and shampoo lane in you local super-mart to the car lots you pass on your way to work everyday.

Q: Is this book for everyone? A: NO - and I think Ramit would be the first one to admit that. If you are looking for a get rich quick scheme, go somewhere else. If you are looking at getting off your lazy butt and doing something to change your current circumstances, BUY THIS BOOK! Worst case scenario is that you can pass it on to a friend who needs it, and they will love you because THEY saved more than $10-15 bucks.

I like the way it is written (it does target a younger audience, but does not leave everyone out). Ramit has a sense of humor and did, at a very young age, what many people only dream about doing - he published his own book!

Way to go man! I salute you!
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 9, 2014
My dad taught me a lot of good things about business, and a lot of bad things about money. Books and seminars taught me about trading stocks, but not about managing personal finances. The Rich Dad Poor Dad books taught me a new way to think about money, but not how to make it and keep it. A college degree in Finance taught me how to read financial statements and calculate NPV and find the interest on a loan, but nothing practical to my personal life. The 4-Hour Work Week taught me some cool life and business hacks, but made me feel bad about having a 9-5 job.

I have been a student of money for my whole life. By that I mean that I've spent my whole life trying to figure out how it works so that I could make it work for me and live a "rich" life. None of it helped much and some actually hurt (like huge student loans!).

When I finally read IWT, it was both a light at the end of the tunnel and a (much needed) slap in the face. I finally learned what I needed to do, and that I was very far behind because of doing things wrong for so long. I learned (a little grudgingly) that financial success doesn't come from the sexy or exciting tricks and it doesn't come quickly. It comes from being smartly boring.

Thank you, Ramit. I wouldn't have a Roth IRA without the guidance of my surrogate Asian father.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 28, 2009
I was trying to come up with an attention-grabbing title for this book to make sure nobody skimmed past. Frankly, I couldn't decide between "great personal finance book" or "the greatest personal finance book." Then I realized, the title sells itself: Ramit Sethi will teach you to be rich.

Ramit Sethi is a brilliant guy (he hired me once or twice) and there's no doubt in my mind that he is, indeed, rich (you have to be to live in San Francisco). Insert one more joke here about him being Indian. Seriously, I've been a long time reader of his blog, aptly titled, I Will Teach You To Be Rich and couldn't wait to get my hands on this book.

MORE THAN JUST A BOOK

This book serves as a six week, step-by-step guide to: reducing debt, using credit cards, eliminating fees, maximizing earnings, automating finances, allocating assets, and reducing spending.

If these all sound like scary things, don't worry, Ramit will hold your hand the entire time. His cheeky, informal writing style sounds more like your best buddy chatting about money than some writer on a soapbox trying to impress you with big words. This book is easy to read, follow-along with and teaches you all the things about finance you wish you had known when you were in your 20s.

CRASH COURSE IN MONEY

I took two personal finances classes in academia: one in high school and one in college. The former taught me lessons like: how to write checks (I don't use paper checks anymore) and how to balance a checkbook (I use Mint to track that information). The latter taught things like: the importance of owning real estate (we all know how that turned out) and how to manually complete your 1040 form (I use TurboTax for that). Point being: traditional finances courses and books aren't doing you a lot of good.

I Will Teach You To Be Rich cuts through the noise (Jim Cramer, anyone?) and gives it to you straight: start saving now, don't invest in individual stocks, real estate isn't the best investment, banks sucks, but despite all of this, feel free to spend lots of money (on the things you love). If you disagree with any of the previous statements, you'll love this book.

BOTTOM LINE

Though I'm biased, I do think this is a must-read for anyone, especially anyone under 30. Plus, I have the benefit of hindsight: the book already hit Amazon's #1 best seller and is still #1 in personal finance.

If I could walk up to each of my friends and slap them with a copy of this book I know it would make a huge difference in their lives. Seriously, I want all of my friends from school to read this book now. Pick up this book and start acting today. It's not hard stuff, and even the simple things like setting up automatic monthly payments have huge benefits: you'll never ever pay a late fee again. You'll never have to remember to set aside money for investing. Simply asking for an increase in your existing credit lines means you can raise your overall credit score saving you hundreds of thousands of dollars in financing (if you buy a house or car).
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 23, 2009
In the last two weeks I've read three finance books to keep me from having a nervous breakdown every time I turned on MSNBC: 1) The WSJ Guide to the End of Wall Street by Dave Kansas; 2) Suze Orman's 2009 Action Plan, and; 3) I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit (pronounced "Ra-meet") Sethi.

Ramit's is by far the best of the three for my purposes (I'm 26, have a job, don't really know what I'm doing w/money, but I love compound interest and try not to be stupid).

This book is worth its weight in gold and here's why:

First, it's targeted to a younger demographic (guessing 18-34, aka the FOX demo), and his advice is much more detailed and specific than the other books: giving readers detailed options for setting up high interest online savings accounts; breaking down renting vs owning; showing you how to save hundreds a month without budgeting ("Budgeting is the worst word in the history of the world") but by spending consciously; figuring out how much a $250 ipod really costs when charged on a CC w/14% APR ($297), and much, much more.

Second, Ramit is very funny and tells good stories. He doesn't talk down to the reader, or say that it's not our fault that we maxed out our credit cards on DVDs and 14 subscriptions to Vibe. Instead, he tells it like it is (for example, "If you miss a credit card payment, you might as well just get a shovel and repeatedly beat yourself in the face.") He's like Dr. Phil, if Dr. Phil weren't a doctor and instead was a skinny Indian kid.

I especially appreciated Ramit's attitude about the Starbucks rule being BS, and that instead of obsessing over lattes, we should focus on the big wins like improving our credit scores. Another valuable distinction he makes is between stupid and conscious spending. Scrimp on unnecessary expenses so that you can spend lavishly, consciously and w/o guilt on the things that really matter to you (nice pens, vacations, expensive stuff for babies, etc.)

Third, this book is well-organized into a 6-week action plan. Of course, it will take more than that to get out of debt, build retirement savings, raise credit scores, etc., but the 6-week schedule will put you well on your way to achieving your financial goals, big and small.

Overall, I walked away from this book with a much clearer understanding of my spending, and a much more functional relationship with my money. My only regret is that it wasn't published sooner, so I could be compound awesome. This is a MUST for every college student, post-grad, young professional, you get the picture. Truly, one of the best, most useful books of its kind, for any generation.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2009
"Don't let the breezy, irreverent style of this book fool you. It contains serious advice on personal-finance decisions from budgeting and savings to spending and investing." - Burton G. Malkiel, author of "A Random Walk Down Wall Street"

For several years, through his blog, Ramit Sethi has been turning the personal finance world on it's head, defying the advice of many financial "experts" and making the topics of money and investing accessible and relevant for the average twenty and thirty-something.

Now, in his first book he draws from some of his best content and goes many steps further, showing us all that personal finance isn't some magic formula to be unlocked, but rather a series of small, conscious decisions that don't require an MBA or even a financial adviser (gasp).

Sethi explains, "Most of us fall into one of two camps as regards our money: We either ignore it and feel guilty, or we obsess over financial details by arguing interest rates and geopolitical risks without taking action. Both options yield the same results - none. The truth is that the vast majority of young people don't need a financial adviser to help them get rich. We need to set up accounts at a reliable no-fee bank and then automate savings and bill payment. We need to know about a few things to invest in, and then we need to let our money grow for thirty years."

Sethi takes the reader through six-weeks to financial literacy, covering:

1) Optimizing Credit Cards
2) Setting up no-fee, high-interest bank accounts
3) Opening investment accounts
4) Figuring out how much you're spending and developing a conscious spending plan
5) automating your new financial infrastructure
6) why investing isn't the same as picking stocks

Throughout the entire book Sethi offers solid financial lessons in a clear and actionable way. He doesn't just say, "Set up an investment account," he shows exactly how to do it, what questions to ask, various options to choose from and gives the reader the necessary contact information for various investment companies.

Since majoring in business management in college and focusing much of my time on the world of personal finance, I have read several books on the subject, some good, most terrible. Many of my friends would come to me for advice on various subjects and I would have to pull on lessons learned from multiple sources. Now, I can just hand them "I Will Teach You to Be Rich" and know that they will be receiving everything they need, all in one place, for a life of financial success.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2009
I loved this book. I pre-ordered it and read it in one weekend. It's an easy read, with humorous and helpful tone. I was a bit doubtful when I first got it, because I thought I had already heard the best tips and gotten all the advice I could get on personal finance. However, I was pleasantly surprised by all the new things I picked up while reading this book. Much of what is helpful in this book, in my opinion, is the way the author addresses the psychological barriers we have or put up that block us from reaching our financial goals. I can honestly say that I now know much much more about personal finance than my friends do.

Here is my personal experience so far with implementing some of Ramit's recommended strategies. I am 25 years old and here are my results.

I have:

- Saved $630 in credit card interest
- Saved $450 in gym membership fees
- Saved $133 on filing taxes
- Got back $375 for a weekend travel/ retreat when I told the company I reserved it through that I was laid off from work after booking the trip and decided it would be better to save the money instead.
- Saved $40 on a prescription medication
- Saved $7445 in my online savings account. Switched to an online savings account with higher interest, which over the course of 1 year will save me about an extra $122.58.
- Paid off $11,000 in credit card debt, leaving a balance of $0. ***THIS ONE MAKES ME VERY HAPPY :)
- Paid off a $3,300 loan from my parents.
- Have invested $1,400 in a 401(k), which I have now rolled over into an IRA account.
- Donated $160 to charitable causes.

I know this book has helped me tremendously and it's just the start. This book is excellent and well worth it.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 28, 2011
This is the best personal finance book I have ever read. After reading this book, I set up new savings & investment accounts and automated my personal finances. Now I'm saving for retirement without having to do too much work. Definitely worth it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
The Millionaire Next Door
The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley Ph.D.
$9.67


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.