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William Eggleston's Guide Hardcover – October 2, 2002


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William Eggleston's Guide + The Americans + Walker Evans: American Photographs: Seventy-Fifth Anniversary Edition
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art, New York (October 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0870703781
  • ISBN-13: 978-0870703782
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 9.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #21,535 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

"William Eggleston was born in 1937 in Memphis, Tennessee. He took his first black-and-white photographs at age 18 and soon became serious about photography, though he never studied it formally. His first color work was shot in 1964 in color negative film, but in the late 60s he began to use color slides; it was some of those slides that he brought with him to New York in 1967, when he met Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander, Garry Winogrand, and John Szarkowski. It was Szarkowski who curated Eggleston's landmark 1976 solo exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York--a breakthrough in the perception of color photography as a serious form of fine art. The recipient of the 1998 Hasselblad Award, Eggleston's work was most recently seen in Documenta11 and in a major retrospective at the Fondation Cartier in Paris."

John Szarkowski is director emeritus of the Department of Photography at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. As director of the department from 1962 through 1991, he oversaw the presentation of more than 100 exhibitions. He also oversaw the publication of more than 30 books and catalogues, the inauguration of the Museum's first photography collection galleries in 1964 and their expansion in 1984 and the establishment of endowments to support the department's programs. Throughout his tenure, he supervised the development of the collection, which now includes more than 25,000 works spanning the history of photography. Szarkowski was born in Ashland, Wisconsin in 1925.

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Customer Reviews

Buy the book and check it out for yourself.
John J. Falkenstine
Spend some time with this book, look at these images, that is the only way to really understand what this work is all about.
Maggie Hasbrouck
William Eggleston was a major influence in American photography and this book exemplifies his early work.
Booker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Filthy McNasty on October 24, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those of you who already know Eggleston, there is something in particular to note about this book. I also purchased Eggleston's "The Hasselblad Award 1998," which features a handful of the same shots in Guide. This provided me an opportunity to compare the same shots in two different publications. There is absolutely no comparison to the superior quality of the prints in William Eggleston's Guide. In fact, shots that I loved in Guide I would not have even really noticed in Hasselblad (very poor color separation, blue tints, etc.). This is the book to get.
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Robin Benson on April 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
William Eggleston's photos grow on you. Look through this book for the first time and the contents seem a bit like ordinary snapshots but look again and then again and with each viewing the images become more familiar (still with something fresh to discover each time) but now they start to blend together seamlessly. One reason for this, I think, is that the photos capture the everyday and the ordinary. Taken around Eggleston's hometown of Memphis and in the Deep South, they show some of his relations, street scenes, interiors, buildings and more, though the captions only state the locations. John Szarkowski says in the books introduction "..today's most radical and suggestive color photography derives much of its vigor from commonplace models" This capturing of the everyday and in color divided the critics in 1976 when the Museum of Modern Art used seventy-five of Egglestons's images for their first exhibition of color photography. The 'Guide' unfortunately only shows forty-eight from the show.

Art photography until this exhibition was in black and white and had been for years, color photos were mostly for ads, commercial print and snapshots. Thankfully the Museum's curator of photography, Szarkowski, had the good sense to allow the public to see something new and fresh. I think the 'Guide' is a good introduction to Eggleston and if you like his creative vision, as I do, have a look at these two books of his work:The Democratic Forest and Ancient & Modern. Both are full of wonderful color photos of the American everyday.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By jack kerr on April 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover
this is where color photography became art, and it is the MOST influential color work done to date. what can you say about this work except that if you are a photography student, lover, practitioner, or simple fan, you must own this book. this is the one folks, where it all began. giving it stars seems silly, but if ever there was a 5 star book, this is it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John J. Falkenstine on November 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Arriving early in 1972 for a Job in Statesboro, Georgia, from Europe as "an immigrant with a passport" these images strike me as well done observations. Many times in the early morning I had mental snapshots of the beautiful lighting and the high humidity that often appeared to act as a "soft filter" and I see that effect in these images as well. So, in addition to being excellent photographs, they are also a time machine from "when things were slower and fewer."
But I also sense that Eggleston is one of the few that still enjoyed a somewhat Patrician upbringing from an era gone by, (The Spoiled Squires of the South) and his images are those of an observer and not a participant. I like the quality of these images that don't have the linear and often harsh quality of digital photography, but the constant and repeated mantras in reviews of this book that Eggleston was a pioneer in color photography are bogus. Others were shooting in color as well, its the exclusionary gallery culture at work here creating their own tall tales.
The front introductory section written by John Szarkowski is for me an entirely separate part of the book and makes for good reading, altough I find the constant name dropping and tortured language that rambles on more of an attempt by John Z to show off his knowledge of photography and how he defines Eggleston's work, and that we readers are mere minions. Enough said, those are my viewpoints. Buy the book and check it out for yourself.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Teper on April 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Since purchased from December last year, finally i have a time to go through the book.
it's really a big surprise, I am shocked by the poor printing quality of the book.
I've chance to get a earlier version of the same book, the prints are much more sharp and the color
is much more rich.The prints of my copy just like all go through "washing process" , the saturation is not
high enough to produce the astonishing effect which Mr. Eggleston's photograph should give.
I was completely disappointed by the quality of this book.it's like printing/copying the photographs from a color photocopier!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lesa Ferguson on March 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a very good reason never to ditch books. It's a picture book and a Kindle or IPad or ereader could never replace it. I put it on my coffee table and every time I pick it up, I learn something new about composition or color or subject matter. It's a master work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Wright on July 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I got this book to see if I could understand why Eggleston gets such high praise. I can't really say that I do - yet. Put this down as me not being smart enough if you will, but I'm more than happy with many other current and past photographers. Many of Eggleston's pictures look like he is trying out a wide angle lens for the first time, or had nothing to do that day – how else to explain a straight picture of the oven with the door open? Or somebody standing in the middle of the road? Perhaps he may be one of those photographers whose work only makes sense when you see full sized prints; the picture on the cover 'Memphis Tricycle' has sold in various forms for hundreds of thousands of dollars a print. So I'll try to hold an open mind for now.
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