Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Willy and Max: A Holocaust Story Hardcover – March 16, 2006


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$32.32 $5.72



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Lexile Measure: 610L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Philomel; First Edition edition (March 16, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399234837
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399234835
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 8.5 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #666,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-6–A story set in Belgium during World War II. Professor Solomon is intrigued by a beautiful painting, The Lady, displayed in the window of the antique shop owned by Willys papa. Entering the store to make their purchase, the professor and his son, Max, meet Willy, and the two boys soon become inseparable companions. Sealing their bond with a photograph showing them in a friendship embrace, the youngsters promise to be friends forever. But the political climate in Antwerp becomes darker as the conquering Nazis approach and the Jewish professor and his son must escape. Before leaving, the painting is rolled up and brought back to the Christian shop owner, where Willy hides it in the basement. The effort is in vain, however, and the prized artwork is lost to the soldiers. Littlesugar and Low have created a moving story about stolen art during this period. Both Max and Willy eventually move to America, but are never reunited. A serendipitous discovery made by a museum curator results in The Lady being returned to Maxs family. Told by Willys grandson, this important aspect of the Holocaust is a facet that deserves discussion. Lows mixed-media paintings in deep, dark hues have a textured, rugged look, contrasting a neighborhood at peace with the frightening atmosphere of one under wartime occupation.–Rita Soltan, Youth Services Consultant, West Bloomfield, MI
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 2-4. In a final author's note, Littlesugar discusses the Nazis' theft of art during World War II and the present efforts to return stolen artworks to their rightful Jewish owners. Unfortunately, Littlesugar's decision to tell the story of the theft and recovery of one special painting through the framework of the idyllic friendship of two Belgian boys--Max, who is Jewish, and Willy, who is a gentile--feels contrived. When the Nazis come and Max's family must flee, they leave a precious painting with Willy's family. Willy hides it, but the Nazis take it. After the war it is found, and 60 years later, with the help of a photo and note that Willy had pasted on its back, the painting is finally returned to Max's son in America. Despite the story's awkwardness, Low's beautiful, double-page paintings bring close the impact of art, at the same time showing the daily details of the kids' friendship in the historic city, the Nazi invasion, and, at last, the heartbreaking reunion. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Kamin on January 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Willy and Max are young boys living in Antwerp, Belgium. Willy's parents owned an antique shop, where Max's father purchased a portrait called "The Lady" that seemed to smile at him. From this encounter, Willy and Max become friends. Soon the Nazis invade Belgium and begin confiscating Jewish homes and property. Max and his father stop at the antique shop and ask Willy's father to hide the portrait as they depart the city. Willy hides it in a statue of an angel. When the Nazis search the antique shop, one decides he likes the angel statue and takes it. Many years later, Willy moved to America. A museum calls to tell him that they found the portrait in the angel with a picture of Willy and Max taped to the back. Willy tracks down Max's family and find out that Max passed away the previous year, but he gives them "The Lady" and joins them for a Sabbath meal.

This story of friendship is enhanced by beautiful color illustrations that are reminiscent of old world Europe as well as amplify the glow of the Sabbath table. The subject matter is extremely timely, as several agencies are working to return art stolen by the Nazis to its rightful owners. The presentation is a creative way of showing many aspects of the era: interaction between Jews and non-Jews; the Nazis' plunder of property, their harassment of non-Jews who interacted with Jews, and the gradual worsening of conditions for all Europeans as World War II progressed. It effectively portrays the terror and abuse tactics of the Nazis without graphic detail. This book is also a good vehicle for discussing friendships, ethics of property ownership, and children during the Holocaust. REVIEWED BY KATHE PINCHUCK (Bloomfield Public Library - Bloomfield, NJ)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gingkogirl on January 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As an educator I am always looking for good, complex text for interactive read-alouds. This book fits the bill. My 5th grade is studying WWII in social studies and we used Willy and Max: A Holocaust Story as part of our historical fiction unit. It is a wonderful story, beautifully written and brings home to the students, in a way they can understand, the long reaching effects of the Holocaust. Buy this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Cuppen on April 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I used this story to introduce my students to the Holocaust. It was a nice way to introduce such an emotional event in history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Jo Nibbs on March 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a moving story about friendship and its survival over the years, about the moral imperative: to do the right thing. The fact that its based on what actually happened makes the book even better. We have it in a set of picture books on the Holocaust theme and students in junior high find it very moving.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is more than a story of the Holocaust; it is a story of friendship and caring in a time when it was a crime to befriend ethnic groups. Both families endured persecution in a cruel way. It is a shame that Willy and Max could not meet in later life, but their descendants did and, I assume, a new relationship ensued.

I did not realize this was a child's book when I purchased it. I wish the author would have followed the lives of Willy and Max, telling some of their teenage and young adult stories. However I donated it to our local Catholic School library where I am sure it will be well utilized.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?