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Win Your Case: How to Present, Persuade, and Prevail--Every Place, Every Time Paperback – November 28, 2006


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Win Your Case: How to Present, Persuade, and Prevail--Every Place, Every Time + How to Argue & Win Every Time: At Home, At Work, In Court, Everywhere, Everyday + The Art of Cross-Examination
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; Reprint edition (November 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312360673
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312360672
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,573 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Spence's cowboy Uncle Slim once said, "You can't get nowhere with a thousand-dollar saddle on a ten-dollar horse." Noted trial lawyer Spence ( How to Argue and Win Every Time) applies this principle to anyone making a case, whether to a jury, a customer or a boss. Tricks and techniques are the high-priced saddle, he says; more important is the person making the case. Thus his method focuses on "the power of being genuine." Even fear, he says, can be used to one's advantage by connecting to the decision maker's own fear. The book first focuses on preparing for the "war" (as Spence calls every case) by discovering this power in oneself. Then it deals with waging the war: improving one's storytelling skills, conducting effective opening and closing statements and using witnesses. He makes a persuasive case for his approach, but his advice is often overwrought and overwritten ("Although we are the same in countless ways, we are, nevertheless, as different from one another as a diamond from rubies, which makes each stone unique, beautiful, and valuable"). Spence's tenets also get lost in his tirade about the injustices of the legal system. It's clear why Spence wins his cases, but he won't necessarily win readers over with this volume. (June 8)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Praise for How to Argue and Win Every Time
by Gerry Spence, narrated by the author:
"As a course in integrity, love and talking from the heart, this program delivers in style and substance." -AudioFile

"Gerry Spence has become the Socrates of Jackson Hole."-Larry McMurtry

"Gerry Spence is one of America's last true originals--a man who thinks as brilliantly as he lives, who writes as compellingly as he talks, and who practices law as faithfully as most people practice religion."--Dan Rather
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Gerry Spence has been a trial attorney for more than five decades and proudly represents "the little people." He has fought and won for the family of Karen Silkwood, defended Randy Weaver at Ruby Ridge, and represented hundreds of others in some of the most notable trials of our time. He is the founder of Trial Lawyer's College, a nonprofit school where, pro bono, he teaches attorneys for the people how to present their cases and win against powerful corporate and government interests. He is the author of fifteen books, including The New York Times bestseller How to Argue and Win Every Time, From Freedom to Slavery, Give Me Liberty, and The Making of a Country Lawyer, and is a nationally known television commentator on the famous trials of our time. He lives in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Customer Reviews

If you purchase this book, you will not regret it.
Glenn Paternoster
A really good book, even if just to brush up on a few ideas to help one navigate life.
Mark Hubert
Gerry Spence's approach to winning trials is dead on!
Mitch Jackson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Charles Kincade on June 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Any practicing trial lawyer would benefit from this book. I have tried in excess of eighty jury trials and am constantly on the lookout for means and methods of improvement. Spence's approach is different from any other. His de-emphasis on traditional trial "techniques" favoring instead to focus on knowing one's true self, and recognizing the profound uniqueness of each of us, is the linch-pin of his approach. Only when we truly know ourselves can we hope to know our clients, opponents, witnesses and the decision-maker, be it judge or jury. And whereas most professional advocates have been taught to remain emotionally removed from their cases and causes, Spence suggests that genuine care is required if one is to win consistently. This care must, of course, be channeled and applied thoughtfully. This book contains many examples of Spence's methods applied to different stages of the trial process (voir dire, opening, direct exam, etc.) and to specific fact patterns.

Does it work? The proof is in the pudding. Spence has amassed a string of trial victories, civil and criminal, unmatched by any other contemporary trial attorney. All attorneys should buy and absorb this book. All clients should buy this book and give it to their attorneys.
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By ktrmes on June 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Every litigator has heard that you need to tell a story at trial. And most have heard that you need a theme. A lawyer's credibility is important at trial. More than a few, perhaps, have themselves uttered these lines to themselves and to others. But what does it actually mean, and how are we to do it? Even those who have been to trials, actually stood in the well of the courtroom and even won, often don't seem to know. "Runaway jury" they will mutter when they lose. Or what about the famous criminal defense attorney who begins his closing with the stirring: "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, the state has not satisfied its burden in this case." Not that he didn't commit this brutal bloody murder, but that the state has not satisfied some legalistic opaque formula of weighing. Trials often seem to a test of who can do the least bad job -- if both sides drone out their scripts of openings, not daring to look over the podium at the jurors then who can tell who's doing the better job. Why can't litigators tell their stories convincingly? First, they may not believe their own stories enough. Second, institutional pressures, the "platooning" of responsibilities prevalent in large firms and just simple fear, fear of doing other than the plodding jobs they have seen in court, fear of reaching out and trying to understand the feeling of the decision makers, and their fears may stand in the way. Also, there is ignorance. There are countless ways to do things at trial poorly and a mere handful of people who do them really well. Spence's book addresses the fear, the ignorance and how to be crdible and why.Read more ›
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Kug VINE VOICE on June 8, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I enjoy Gerry Spence and love his attitude and dedication to the common man. I loved How to Argue and Win Everytime and this began as better than that. But by midway through I felt my expectations were violated as this was billed as not just a courtroom book, which is interesting, but a practical application book. While much of what he says certainly has application anywhere my personal disappointment was in the heavy trial legal application through 75% of the book. If I was a lawyer this would be a superb book - just not exactly what I thought but he has lots to teach us.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C. Stombaugh on June 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I have read most of his other books. Its application to lawyers and others on how to persuasively win their cases using many of the same methods taught at the famous Trial Lawyers College in Wyoming is invaluable. Easily the best book on trial advocacy I have ever read, more useful than his prior excellent book released ten years ago, How To Argue and Win Every Time. It should be required reading in every law school.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Erol Esen VINE VOICE on April 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Gerry Spence has a rather eloquent way of describing what charisma is: "Charisma is the controlled transfer of raw emotion."

It seems the whole book revolves around his definition of charisma. Once you have raw emotion you could then use tools like visual aids (and the book goes into details of this sort but always reminding the reader to be real) and so forth to transfer raw emotion to someone else (or a jury), in a controlled way.

It is the charisma that helps you present, persuade and prevail every place, every time, as the book's subtitle promises. And the book certainly transfers.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brandy on July 20, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I listened to the audio book, which is long but wonderful! Once you get through the book you will have learned several very valuable lessons. Mr. Spence provides several approaches for winning your case and learing how to be genuine and convincing. He advocates an emotional and honest investment in your situation and he tells you exactly how to do it. It works, and although many of his cases give court room stories, anyone can apply it to their own life outside the court room. We often interrogate others while being interrogated in life. Check it out!!
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