Wind and the Lion 1975 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(347)
Available in HD

At the beginning of the 20th century an American woman is abducted in Morocco by Berbers. The attempts to free her range from diplomatic pressure to military intervention.

Starring:
Sean Connery, Candice Bergen
Runtime:
2 hours 0 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Wind and the Lion

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Adventure, Action
Director John Milius
Starring Sean Connery, Candice Bergen
Supporting actors Brian Keith, John Huston, Geoffrey Lewis, Steve Kanaly, Vladek Sheybal, Nadim Sawalha, Roy Jenson, Deborah Baxter, Jack Cooley, Chris Aller, Simon Harrison, Polly Gottesman, Antoine Saint-John, Aldo Sambrell, Luis Barboo, Darrell Fetty, Marc Zuber, Shirley Rothman
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

It's a great adventure movie.
Jeff Cordell
Connery wants to force the European powers out of Morocco, which at that time is occupied by the British, French, and Germans, each with different interests.
Michael Puttre
This is one of my all-time favorite movies!!!
Mark Wagner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

151 of 156 people found the following review helpful By Michael Puttre on October 31, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
My all time favorite movie and the best movie you've never seen is "The Wind and the Lion" (1975). Written and directed by John Milus (who later wrote "Apocalypse Now" and directed "Conan The Barbarian"), it stars Sean Connery, Candice Bergen, Brian Keith, and John Houston. Connery is a Berber chief, Risuli the Magnificent, who kidnaps American Candice Bergen in Morocco in 1906 (or so). Connery wants to force the European powers out of Morocco, which at that time is occupied by the British, French, and Germans, each with different interests. Brain Keith is President Teddy Roosevelt (and he really is) who sends the Marines to Morocco "to get respect." In the end, the Americans and Connery's Berbers make common cause against the Germans.
For me, Brian Keith as Teddy is worth the price of admission all by himself. This movie is well-written, funny, has great line after great line, super characters, and some rousing battle scenes. Plus, the kids can watch it. You really can't go wrong with "The Wind and the Lion." I only wish they'd release it on DVD...
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88 of 93 people found the following review helpful By Barbara J. Selletti on December 8, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
The Wind and the Lion is a fabulous, old-fashion adventure film with something for everybody: dashing leading man (Sean Connery), plucky, pretty (let's not forget smart) leading lady (Candice Bergen), a terrific supporting cast (which includes Brian Keith (as Teddy Roosevelt) and John Huston (yes, the director), gorgeous scenery and action aplenty! I remember seeing this on a date with an ex-marine (he loved the Marines and fight scenes, funny thing) in 1975, when it was first released in theaters and seeing this video brought back all the excitement I felt for it this movie. Connery is so sexy...you can't help but be swept away! Bergen is the perfect foil for Connery; able to hold her own on the screen with him. Their comedic reparte' is so endearing. I still can recite some of the lines by heart! The cinematography is epic, the sound track, monumental (I bought the CD! ) The director obviously had a field day with this (you'd never guess he was a ex-marine! ) If you're looking for a historically accurate movie...pass this by, but if you're looking for a little old-fashion adventure, give this one a try. There is violent content, but no inappropriate language or nudity (the closest to nudity you'll find in this is when Sean has his shirt off.) Go on...give yourself over to a little adventure! Grab your popcorn, your significate other and ride back in time with the Raisuli. Mrs. Pedicaris, I'm glad you're a lot of trouble!
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66 of 70 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 21, 2002
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Well, I wait patiently for this movie to be released on DVD. In the meantime, I keep the VCR so I can watch this movie for the umpteenth time. In many ways, this screen adaption of actual events seems more appropriate to be viewed in these times. The movie is a VERY loose depiction of actual events: the kidnapping of an American businessman in Morocco. Look beyond that and you will find a story that reflects admirably on the antagonists. Candice Bergen plays the (subtle) potential love interest of the Raizuli, and well, Sean Connery, is Sean Connery, in the best tradition of a Scostman playing an Arab. Anyway, Brian Keith's portrayal of Teddy Roosevelt makes you wish he were still alive so you could vote for him in the next election. This is one of my all time favorites and it makes you feel good to be an American (not wanting to be jingoistic or anything). The movie does depict an era when international politics was not so seemingly complicated as they are now. The portayal of Arab Muslims is fair: good and bad traits, as in all people on this planet. The depiction of the Marines coming ashore, is well, one of the best (unintentional) recruiting tools for the USMC. I understand these scenes use (still?) to be shown at USMC Officer Candidate School. This is a truly enjoyable film.
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Robert B. Bradshaw on October 1, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
I first saw The Wind and the Lion when it came out in theaters. Always a big fan of sweeping adventure stories, this one became an instant favorite. Though years have passed and movie action has become even more lavish and intense, nothing has ever dimmed this jewel in my eyes. In fact, the years have made the romance more poignant and the irony more telling. Forget history: Pedicaris was a man. Forget stereotypes: the Berber is the hero. This is a romantic adventure of the highest order: remember the little boy who dreams of becoming a Barbary Pirate. As that marvelous score swells up around you, and Sean Connery leans down from the galloping horse, grabbing not the boy, but the gun he is carrying, you can feel the boy's disappointment at not being carried along for the next adventure.
There are many levels at work in this film. The genius of John Milius is such that the Roosevelt era of "gunboat diplomacy" can be seen as both the crowing of young America as it was forcing its way into World politics, and as a reflection of the debacle of Viet Nam that was the end result of such bullish behavior.
In its examination of relationships between men and women, the human foibles of men looked upon as leaders, and the brutal reality of the human condition, this movie is right on target. But, in the end, it is a romance, a dream of what could be -- but usually isn't. The good guys survive, but they all show that they have paid a heavy price for having played the game.
MGM will be doing all movie fans a favor when they bring this out on DVD.
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