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Wind Will Carry Us: 15th Anniversary Edition


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Product Details

  • Actors: Behzad Dorani, Bahman Ghobadi
  • Directors: Abbas Kiarostami
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Farsi
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Cohen Media Group
  • DVD Release Date: July 22, 2014
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00K2OC05M
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #366,729 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

When an engineer and his colleagues from Tehran arrive in a remote village in Iranian Kurdistan, the locals assume they are archaeologists or telecom engineers. Even though they form an ambivalent relationship with the community, the visitors behavior and keen interest in the health of an ailing old woman appear strange, and their true motives are shrouded in mystery. A haunting and visually stunning masterpiece from Palme dOr winning director Abbas Kiarostami, one of the most important figures in modern Iranian cinema. Winner, Grand Special Jury Prize and FIPRESCI Prize at the Venice Film Festival

Customer Reviews

My HDTV is 240hz, so motion blur should not be an issue.
rater25
This film is a typical Kiarostami film, slow paced but at the same time deeply rich and complex through well exectuted symbolism.
"readlove"
Many people who like Kiarostami talk about Taste of Cherry or Close Up when speaking of his work.
Grigory's Girl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Chris Stolz on September 11, 2005
Format: DVD
Abbas Kiarostami is surely one of the top talents in cinema anywhere. For those accustomed to Hollywood, Bollywood or European movies, his work will seem deceptively simple and slow. Eschewing professional actors, special effects, top-40 and world music soundtracks, complicated make-up and massive advertising campaigns, Kiarostami makes films that unfold into an extraordinaray philosophical complexity that is firmly and compassionately anchored in day-to-day human experience.

In "The WInd WIll Carry Us," a man from Teheran moves to a small village in order to do a job for his employer. His exact mission is unclear. He has hilarious trouble with his cell phone, flirts with a milkmaid, watches the slow and subtle rhythms of village life, and sometimes does nothing.

It is a testament to Kiarostami's perception and skill that the film-- despite its simple story and slow pacing-- is utterly captivating and complex. The film's title comes from an old Persian love poem that the protagonist quotes during his flirtation:

"In the courtyard, the wind is about to meet the leaves."

The sexual allusion here is also a philosophical one, as the protagonist seems to be waiting for some kind of chemical reaction, something to shake him up and lift him. How this moment of awakening will come is the film's subject, and Kiarostami leads us to it the way life does-- indirectly. We must watch, and look, and SEE, what is happening in the village-- and in the contrast between the protagonist's frantic running after his phone calls and the village's slow and deliberate movement toward the film's climactic ritual emerge its meaning.

Kiarostami's cinematography is simple and effective.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J_J_Gittes on September 30, 2005
Format: DVD
Saw the film again after three years, and it`s lyrical beauty was even more obvious than the first time. The title is taken from a poem, and when it is recited, in the darkness of a cave, one can feel all the beauty that surrounds us, even if we don`t always see it.

The Film is about a man who has an inner struggle, but doesn`t want to see it. Only at the end of the film he aknowledges it, though he can`t solve it. The small village he came to, 700 miles away from Teheran, awakens his senses, his lust for life, even though he came looking for death. When in the end the old woman dies, it is totally unexpected, and it doesn`t really matter anymore. Maybe he will stay, maybe he will go, but he is changed.

Life needs living says this film, almost shouts it in your face, but with such warmth of breath, that you go with it. Along with the estranged character the viewer starts to rediscover the world, if he pays attention, and out of the endless flow of time, compassion starts to arise, compassion for the flowers, the trees, the earth, and the people, with all their beauty and shortcomings.

The worst disease is death says a character in the film, when we`ll have to leave this earth. One day, the wind will carry us away.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Doug Anderson VINE VOICE on November 2, 2003
Format: DVD
Plot summary: Film crew travels to remote village to document a death ritual. Once in the village, however, they find the deathly ill woman has not perished yet and so they settle in and wait. Each day they enquire about the old womans health and each day the news is different. The focus is on one member of the crew and how he slowly acclimates himself to the villagers, to nature, and to time as he waits for an event that may or may not occur.
This is my second Abbas Kiorastami film. I recently saw Close Up and after seeing this one I want to see all of his films. Kiorastami is a film maker for people who want something unique. Hollywood is all about stating the obvious and Kiorastami is all about subtlety. Most films work by speeding things up and meeting expectations but Kiorastami works by slowing things down and subverting expectations. In CLOSE UP an out-of-work man with a family to support pretends to be a famous director and befriends a wealthy family who believes he truly is the director. As time passes the family begins to suspect that he may not be who he says he is. It is an intimate study of human relationships and how relationships develop to fulfill a mutual need. When the family finds out the man is merely an imposter they are angry at first and they take him to court but then as they listen to his reasons for pretending they forgive him and at films end we see that the friendship will resume. It is an examination of how relationships form and also an examination of society and how society shapes the way we relate to and see each other. THE WIND WILL CARRY US is another version of this story but instead of the poor man befriending the rich it is about a city dweller befriending village folk.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 19, 2007
Format: DVD
I loved "The Wind Will Carry Us" for many reasons. First, there are two story lines, one is what is happening on the physical plane and the other is a representation of two ideas and ways of living.

The main plot is fairly basic. A man goes to a small village (Siah Dareh) built up against a barren mountainside. This alone is fascinating as you observe a culture and how the people live their daily lives. One of the main things that keeps happening throughout the movie is a cell phone ringing.

Each time the phone rings, the engineer from Tehran (Behzad Dourani) has to get into his car and drive up to higher ground. This is interesting because each time he does this something new happens. It almost becomes a little comical, but the funniest part for me was the relationship between the husband and wife in the teashop. I was amused at how similar relationships are in all cultures and how men and women form a deep bond all while withstanding the daily conflicts seeking to drive us apart.

The movie felt very realistic and didn't seem to follow a script. I loved that aspect and also the conversations between the characters had real heart. Instead of "how are you," "I'm fine," they would say things about wishing each other a long life or luck or the most beautiful comment was about "being in your service." The conversations where very interesting and felt very natural, comforting and at times were profoundly beautiful.

There was a strong community aspect where everyone joined together to make life more pleasant. The care and concern of the villagers was profound and moving and made you wish to just go live in this village where people seemed to have made peace with a way of life they truly enjoyed.
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