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The Windows 2000 Device Driver Book: A Guide for Programmers (2nd Edition) Paperback – November 30, 2000

21 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 007-6092008897 ISBN-10: 0130204315 Edition: 2nd

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Read the full review for this book.

At just over 520 pages, The Windows NT Device Driver Book is half the length and less longwinded than more recent texts. However, it is less complete than more recent books and has been criticized as inaccurate on NT DDK mail lists and (with the advent of Windows 2000 and WDM drivers) out of date. Still, some minor things are covered in this book that are not covered in the current crop of books. This includes using hardware compatibility test suites (the HCT CD-ROMs in the MSDN) as a part of stress testing drivers and using DUMPEXAM as well as WinDbg.exe to read crash dumps. --Regan Russell, Dr. Dobb's Electronic Review of Computer Books -- Dr. Dobb's Electronic Review of Computer Books --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

The most comprehensive, authoritative guide to Windows NT driver development. Now that Windows NT is rapidly becoming the business operating system of choice, more and more programmers are faced with developing Windows NT drivers. This book explains the complex Windows driver architecture, and presents insights into a myriad of practical details that are rarely, if ever, documented. It clarifies the murky Microsoft Driver Documentation Kit (DDK) documentation, and contains extensive detail missing from the DDK. This information is essential now, and will prepare developers for the future, when Microsoft introduces the common Win32 Driver Model for Windows NT and Windows 95. Learn about the NT I/O Manager and its data structures, and discover how various hardware issues impact driver design. Learn about full-duplex driver architecture, techniques for handling time-out conditions, logging device errors, kernel-model threads, higher-level drivers, and class drivers for SCSI devices. Understand how to set up a driver development environment and analyze crash dumps. Includes extensive sample code on diskette, designed specifically to help streamline development projects. For all Windows programmers who have a role in writing device drivers. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 2 edition (November 30, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130204315
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130204318
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 1 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #366,124 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have read all, but one of the Windows 2000/NT device driver books and found this one to be the best for beginners, by far. It is very well organized in a top-down approach. I though the concepts were well presented and easy to understand. After readin two other books on NT device drivers, this one finally explained things clearly for me.

The book is also very hands-on. It describes an example device drive in full source and develops it through each chapter. You can actually build the driver as you go and the driver is developed as you would develop your own driver.

I do want to make it clear that this book is not a definitive refence. It does conatin errors, but the approach for teaching Windows driver development is its strength. You'll want to get OSR's and Wlater Oney's Windows driver development books to get a good foundation.

This book is also not wordy and quick-reading. I would suggest is, if you are trying to grasp NT device drivers.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Siddharth U. Sawe on October 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
I am pasting this review that i had originally posted in 2001 at other websites.

This is one of the best books i have read. I have several years of experience in C/C++ and some experience in windows programming however I am a 'absolute beginner' with Windows device drivers and kernel mode programming and i was able to grasp almost everything the book spoke about with relative ease and with NO confusions. I would recommend this book to anyone who has absolutely no background in device driver programming but wants to make a career doing just that. I must admit that the books assumes that you are versed with C/C++ and some understanding of programming paradigm for windows, but it is pretty obvious since this is NOT a book to teach a programming language nor it is aimed at teaching regular windows programming. It is a complete 'NO NONSENSE' book that deals with topics right upto the point. The contents of the book flow gracefully explaining each and every step with precise detail. The author seems to have made the best possible effort to explain the basics before jumping directly into details. And that does help an absolute beginner. This book does NOT cover details about device specific drivers but it does help you reach a point where you are confident that 'you will understand' whatever you research on your own. A very good book... have seen very few of these types lately.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Turner on November 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
For neophytes, writing a Windows NT device driver is often an extremely frustrating experience. I first wrestled with the DDK when I was asked to write a device driver for NT (version 3.5). The DDK documentation was wrong in several places. Thankfully, it has improved, but still leaves a lot to be desired.
Years later, Art Baker was the first to produce a readable driver development. It was, and still is, an excellent primer for those interested in developing device drivers for the NT operating system.
The information is still relevant for those of us who must maintain legacy NT drivers.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Excellent job revising the NT Device Driver book for Windows 2000. My group used the previous version, which had numerous errors and slow reading. I have also read all other books on this subject matter. It is obvious Mr. Lozano understands his audience. The book demonstrates expertise on the author's part. I especially enjoyed building an actual driver as I read through the book. Great presentation!
I look forward to more of Mr. Lozano's books.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jason Zions on May 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
While a relatively understandable introduction to the topic, it cannot serve as a reliable reference given the number of errors contained in it. Moreover, the author is working on a second edition, due at the end of the year; I can't recommend spending money on the current form.
At the time it was written, it was the only thing available and valuable for that alone; but there are better alternatives today. Get the Anthony Mason/Peter Viscarola book instead.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Anonymous Engineer on August 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a more concise, better organized version of the DDK documentation, minus the reference material. It does a good job of painting a picture of driver architecture and gets you familier with the terminology involved. However, it does not provide much insight or real-world tips, and in fact the regurgitation of Microsoft definitions and propoganda gets a little tiresome. This book does not go into much detail and is not a reference book. After you've read most of this book you can easily rely on the DDK documentation and never flip through these pages again.

A couple specific gripes: 1) If the reader has never written a driver before, they've probably never worked in kernel mode before, so more general information on kernel-mode programming issues would have been appreciated. 2) Though this book does not go into much detail, the forward did promise a chapter on USB and IEEE 1394 available on the book's website. I was not able to find any such chapter on the website, and haven't received a response to my email requesting the information (to be fair I've only given him a couple days).
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 21, 1997
Format: Paperback
I write NT drivers and kernel extensions for a living so I have already been baptised so to speak. Even so, because Microsoft has been so tight lipped about NT's internals, there is much I have to learn. And, indeed I did by reading Art's book.

I just finished Art's book and I must say that I am impressed with his choice of subjects, his clear style and his light humor throughout. Moreover, his examples teach in fact what his narative imaginatively presents. If you are buying this book to teach you about writing a certain kind of driver, say NDIS 4.0, then don't. It's very short on specifics of that kind. But, if you want to learn the "basics" about writing NT drivers, this will get it done. The gift that Art brings through his book is more than dry facts about NT driver lore and technique. Unlike the DDK Guide, Art has placed the process into perspective by presenting the material in a logically progressive manner. Further, we benefit from Art's long experience at teaching the subject as well as, I suspect, his hobknobbing with the MS development folks and having had many a question answered. I would not be surprised to learn that he has "even" seen NT's sources since he formerly worked for DEC with their intimate association with Uncle Bill's Belleview Works. I know that I have come to understand some things that, frankly, I thought were in the realm of accepting on faith.

To sum up, though experienced, I learned alot, and, I am convinced I will continue to do so every time I pick it up in the future. I do have one caution to offer. Art's book is no substitute for the DDK Guide -- I think after reading Art's book, you should then skim through the Guide. It's in the neighborhood of 1000 screen pages of if you want to print it out, it's much shorter.
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The Windows 2000 Device Driver Book: A Guide for Programmers (2nd Edition)
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