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Windows 8.1: The Missing Manual Paperback – December 6, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1449371623 ISBN-10: 1449371620 Edition: 1st

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Windows 8.1: The Missing Manual + Windows 8.1 Update Quick Reference Guide: Introduction (Cheat Sheet of Instructions, Tips & Shortcuts - Laminated) + Windows 8.1 For Dummies Book + DVD Bundle
Price for all three: $51.75

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Product Details

  • Series: Missing Manual
  • Paperback: 950 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (December 6, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449371620
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449371623
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (145 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.


More About the Author

David Pogue is the founder of YahooTech.com, having been groomed for the position by 13 years as the technology columnist for the New York Times. He's also a monthly columnist for Scientific American, host of science shows on PBS's "NOVA," frequent public speaker, and a science/tech correspondent for "CBS Sunday Morning."

With over 3 million books in print, David is one of the world's bestselling how-to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "for Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music); in 1999, he launched his own series of complete, funny computer books called the Missing Manual series, which now includes 120 titles. Having discovered that so many people don't know some of the most fundamental tech techniques on their tech gadgets, he set out in 2014 to write "Pogue's Basics," a single book that attempts to be the driver's ed course for technology.

David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in Music, and he spent ten years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals in New York. He's won two Emmy awards, two Webby awards, a Loeb award for journalism, and an honorary doctorate in music. He's been profiled on "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes." He lives in Connecticut with his wife and three children.

Customer Reviews

Very well written and easy to understand.
Kenton D. Sharpe
I am amongst those who were very happy with Windows 95/98, XP and 7, but who strongly dislike Windows 8/8.1.
Wilbur Sachs
This book methodically covers the missing information well.
Tim Webster

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 97 people found the following review helpful By R. Laudig on December 2, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I just bought a new ASUS Transformer that is running Win 8.1. Coming from a laptop with Win 7, I needed considerable hand holding in order find my way around 8.1. After reading the reviews (something I really appreciate with Amazon) I decided to try this book. It not only looked like it had what I needed, but it was also available as an eBook. I got it instantly on my Fire 7HD and was able use it right at my side as I wandered through my new ASUS. I am impressed with the overall coverage which seems to me to be written in a rather 'middle of the road' manner. This is, not too simplistic, but also not too technical. The author has included small side notes on either side if the main text that will explain some things in a simpler manner for those with limited experience as well as side notes for those who would appreciate more technical details. I have just read the first four chapters, but have found them very helpful in understanding how 8.1 works as well as some very handy tips and shortcuts. I am looking forward to reading through the entire book. I would highly recommend this to anyone who is migrating to Win 8.1. Incidentally, I have found it extremely handy to have it as an eBook at my side on my Fire while using the Transformer.
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82 of 84 people found the following review helpful By John Jacobson on December 26, 2013
Format: Paperback
Windows 8.1

Missing manual? What manual? I’m an experienced computer user since the days of DOS, and have made my way through all the iterations of Windows since version 3.0. I recently purchased a Microsoft Surface Pro 2 and had my first introduction to Windows 8.1. There was certainly no documentation with the computer that gave any clue to navigating the new user interface, it took me several days to begin to use the computer in a productive manner, learning by trial and error. And there were more errors in the beginning for sure.

But this review isn’t on Windows 8.1, it’s on the missing manual. And this book by David Pogue is comprehensive (932 pages) and well written. It even has an index of 32 pages. For most users the biggest hurdle in dealing with the new operating system is the tiled interface. This book explains the reasons for and the use of the tiled “tablet” interface, and explains the gestures need to utilize the new interface with ease.

One of the biggest complaints that users have about any operating system is their frustration with the myriad ways to complete a particular action. David Pogue charts a middle course, he doesn’t list every way, but he tends to show how to complete the action with the mouse, with the keyboard, and if applicable, with touch. He also touches (sorry) on using Windows 8.1 in much the same way that Windows 7 is used, which will be the most common choice of those who work with programs such as Word, Excel, and Photoshop. He covers the “touch” interface which is likely to be used most commonly in tablets and some touch-enabled laptops. As is usual with David, his descriptions and explanations are clear and unambiguous.

I think this book is a must have for those who wish to understand the features of and utilize in full the productivity of Windows 8.1. Highly recommended.
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54 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Brett Merkey on December 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
I don't particularly like the new and controversial Windows "TileWorld" and I guess I'm not alone. Win 8.1 reflects certain concessions to user feedback and that is good.

The "missing manual" books are solid values. I have bought and reviewed several. David Pogue, an experienced and enthusiastic writer, is fun to read online and this book is as good and as lively as expected.

Consider buying this book *before* actually having to confront Windows 8+ for the first time. Yes, you will end up with this excellent 900 page reference (with index) on your shelf or in your e-reader but it would also be a great companion for those first moments and hours with the new operating system. Pogue starts his first chapters almost as if had that precise scenario in mind.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By T. Anderson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 16, 2014
Format: Paperback
I have said more than once that one of the biggest misconceptions people have about my skill set is that because I can develop software for the iPhone, iPad, and Windows 8 tablets, I must know everything there is to know about using them. 90% of my time spent on a computer is spent in code, UML tools, and using basic Word functionality.

I do not play games, make photo albums, plan vacations, or read books on them. In other words, I am not as computer savvy as the business user or teenager that use them to connect to the world and conduct their business or coordinate a gaming session.

I am very grateful for the Missing Manual series because they put everything I need to know about my devices in one place, and I don't have to spend the time looking for features.

I have listed the eight parts of this Missing Manual and the chapters they contain below.

Part One. TileWorld
1. The Start Screen
2. Customizing the Lock, Login & Start Screens
3. How TileWorld Works
4. TileWorld’s Starter Apps
5. TileWorld Settings

Part Two. The Windows Desktop
6. File Explorer, Folders & the Taskbar
7. Searching & Organizing Your Files
8. Redesigning Your Desktop World
9. Help at the Desktop
10. Programs & Documents
11. The Desktop’s Starter Programs
12. The Control Panel

Part Three. Windows Online
13. Hooking Up to the Internet
14. Security & Privacy
15. Internet Explorer 11
16. Windows Live Mail

Part Four. Pictures & Music
17. Windows Photo Gallery
18. Windows Media Player

Part Five. Hardware & Peripherals
19. Printing, Fonts & Faxing
20. Hardware & Drivers

Part Six. PC Health
21.
Read more ›
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