Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.00
  • Save: $6.54 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item qualifies for FREE shipping and Prime! This item is used.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Windows NT Shell Scripting Paperback – April 27, 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.46
$14.80 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Windows NT Shell Scripting + Windows Script Host
Price for both: $75.54

Buy the selected items together
  • Windows Script Host $50.08

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; 1 edition (April 27, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578700477
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578700479
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #553,331 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The command line isn't dead--far from it. Administrators of big Windows NT networks know that the best way to accomplish a difficult task frequently involves using the console interface rather than the graphical user interface. By writing batch routines, it's relatively easy to perform fancy tasks on local computers and distant ones. In Windows NT Shell Scripting, Tim Hill has done a service by explaining how to write and use scripts under Windows NT.

He begins at the beginning, explaining what scripting is and how command lines come to exist under Windows NT. The reader gets full information on virtual DOS machines and how programs started by scripts are instantiated. There's also some useful information on redirecting script output--handy when using batch files to create HTML documents, for example.

If you think the way batch files handle subroutines, variables, and pretty much everything else involves some weird syntax, you're right. Hill decrypts it all, explaining the mechanics of the Windows NT batch-scripting language very clearly. After he explains how to script academically, he provides some examples. There's a script that automates the creation of user accounts, another script that monitors print activity, another that keeps an eye on disk usage, and one that does backups. A few more scripts round out the selection. Many of the scripts refer to a library of functions that's also listed and explained. Unfortunately, there's no companion disk, so readers have to get the samples from the Macmillan Web site.

It would be nice if this book contained some coverage of the new Windows Scripting Host, which you can use to write scripts in VBScript, JavaScript, and (in the future) other languages like Perl and Python. But that's cutting-edge stuff that hasn't yet been fully figured out, and what this book contains is great. All harried sysadmins, particularly those who came on line after the age of DOS had begun to wane, will be grateful for the guidance Hill provides. --David Wall

From the Back Cover

Windows NT Shell Scripting is a comprehensive reference for network professionals. It is the only book available on the practical use of the Windows NT shell scripting language. The book begins with a high-level introduction to the shell language itself, then describes the shell commands that are useful for controlling or managing different components of a network, i.e. file management, etc. The second part of the book is a comprehensive reference of all the commands, organized by function, for easy reference by the reader.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
45
4 star
4
3 star
3
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 53 customer reviews
Thank you Tim for doing Microsoft's job.
"denisrenaud"
This book gave me insight into the aditional abilities of the NT command shell.
Scott Bicknell
Provides a thorough explanation of how to code in this archaic environment.
W. J. Williams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
Tim Hill's "Windows NT Shell Scripting" is a useful guide to NT shell scripts, even for those who have extensive experience with UNIX scripts or DOS batch files. It explains in detail the operations of NT's cmd.exe console and how it differs from the MS-DOS command.com shell. It also contains several scripts for user management and other administrative tasks, and an alphabetical list of Resource Kit commands as well as standard shell commands.
Only one minor caveat: in the section detailing the SLEEP command, there is a :WAITLOOP technique that can be more elegantly effected by the use of a /WAIT switch during the START command (which the book also documents).
I recommend this book highly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jakob Hussfelt on April 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
If you have a bit of programming experience, this book together with access to the NT Resource Kit tools will provide you with the foundation for doing almost anything you could imagine within Windows NT Shell Scripting.
The book can be used both as a tutorial and a reference for Windows NT scripting and gives good examples of the commands, tools and concepts covered. For Windows NT, this book does the job as your Shell Scripting Bible in less than 400 pages.
Since Windows NT 4.0, a lot has happened in the Windows scripting field though. With the release of Windows 2000 and the subsequent Windows XP and .NET Server, shell scripting has become much more powerful. A second edition of this book covering the new commands and tools would be most welcome. Until one exists, you might also want to look at newer books covering shell scripting for operating systems based on the Windows NT kernel.
You might also want to look at other, often more powerful ways to script your Windows NT-based environment. For that matter I recommend looking at other books covering WSH (Windows Script Host), ADSI and WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Scott Bicknell on September 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
I am new to NT (Windows 2000) and use the system at home, not at work. I made good use of the DOS command line before Windows 3.0 was introduced and was pleasantly surprised to find that the Windows 2000 command shell includes all of the features DOS had, and more, some of which Windows 95 eliminated, and which Windows 98 eliminated more of.
This book gave me insight into the aditional abilities of the NT command shell. Since I use Windows 2000, which was released after the publication of this book, I also make frequent reference to online help. I have found that Windows 2000 has command shell enhancements not found in Windows NT 4.
This book's strength is that it shows you how to create libraries of routines for use in batch files and that it gathers in one place a wealth of information about command-line scripting with batch files. It revealed to me that batch files can do much more than I thought previously.
I was a bit dismayed, however, when the author stated that there was no way to echo a blank line to the console. A feature introduced in DOS 5.0, and well documented, is the use of the echo. command (echo followed by a dot with no space). This works just as well with cmd.exe as with command.com.
Other than that this is a great book.
If you want a complete reference for scripting in Windows NT and Windows 2000, get this book and "Windows Scripting Secrets". Together with the online reference they provide all the information you could want about scripting using the command line and Windows Script Host.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By booklover on December 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
I come to NT shell scripting from a UNIX background. This book gave me the information I needed to know to write effective NT shell scripts.
At first I tried to use my old DOS manuals but the scripts I wrote didn't work since things have changed. This book gave me the updated information I needed to accomplish my tasks.
It is clearly written and extremely well organized. The book serves as both tutorial and reference.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent, excellent book. As other reviews noted it is one of the few places this information is available conveniently and concisely. Do not be put off by the references to UNIX users or system administrators. Although the book is indispensable for those categories of users it is also highly useful for the programmer, power user, or really anyone who wants to grab Windows, pull off its GUI, and shake it until it DWIM (Does What I Mean!). Two minor criticisms: Although well worth it, the book is more expensive than comparable ones, such as the extraordinary O'Reilly Nutshell series... I would also like to see more, and more comprehensive, command syntax examples. I would be less likely to make these criticisms if a CD was included with the example scripts and additional examples or if the promised Web site was available with this information. IMHO the concept of a book/CD combined with an update-and-download Web site is a "killer app" that will really propel on-line sales. A great example is the "Windows Annoyances" combo. The convenience of a book with the immediacy of the Internet! Now, if they could just figure out a way to download the second edition into my hard copy ;-)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Charles Rutledge on April 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
Although this book was authored in 1998, it is still as relavent today with Windows Server 2003 as it was when Windows NT 4.0 was first released. The fact is that the Command Shell hasn't changed all that much over the years and Timothy Hill's book remains the best guide to using and writing command scripts that I could ever recommend. And with Windows Server 2003's push to be able to do everything from the command line that one can do from the GUI, it's even more important to fully understand how the Windows Command Shell works.

Windows NT Shell Scripting is less about Windows NT than it is about how to write shell scripts. It covers the details of using the Command Shell in interactive mode, its configuration and how the 32-bit Command Shell differs from the 16-bit DOS box. Then it delves into the structure and syntax of the Command Shell language, providing a clear understanding of how the program control features such as IF and FOR work. Finally, it shows you how to create sophisticated shell scripts using the internal commands and external command-line utilities included with Windows and their Resource Kits.

Not everything in this book has survived the test of time. The old task scheduler using the AT command, though still supported in current version of Windows, has been mostly replaced by more powerful Scheduled Tasks of Windows 2000 and later. And you will want to supplement this book with a modern reference of the utility programs available for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 (such as OReilly's "Windows Server 2003 In A Nutshell"). Yet this represents only a small part of the book and majority of material stands up very well. Certainly there is no better and more in-depth tutorial for building command scripts than Timothy Hill's book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?