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Winning Investors Over: Surprising Truths About Honesty, Earnings Guidance, and Other Ways to Boost Your Stock Price Hardcover – November 15, 2011


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Winning Investors Over: Surprising Truths About Honesty, Earnings Guidance, and Other Ways to Boost Your Stock Price + Investor Relations: The Art of Communicating Value, 2nd Edition: Four Basic Steps to a Successful IR Program & Creating the Ultimate Communications Platform + Running an Effective Investor Relations Department: A Comprehensive Guide
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (November 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 142211502X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422115022
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #505,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“a perceptive, thorough, well-timed book about how to ensure you and your company have a productive, long-term relationship with the capital markets and investors.” — Listed magazine (Canada)

“The book is a model of clear organization and is written in a breezy style. In 14 succinct chapters, with summaries and takeaways, it makes a persuasive case for transparent dealings between corporations and their shareholders, arguing that deviations from the straight and narrow will be punished sooner rather than later.” — Strategy + Business

“Lev has written an enjoyable and informative handbook for those who wish to learn how best to win investors over and what kind of information genuinely influences the price of a stock.” — Financial Analyst Journal

“Unlike many other academics, Lev writes entertaining and free-flowing prose that makes Winning Investors Over an enjoyable read” — Enterprising Investor/CFA Institute

“excellent new book…” - The Economist

“The book offers valuable counsel on how to manage investors' expectations and reactions through policies of forthrightness. And, from an investor's standpoint, it provides a valuable window on how such policies should be pursued.” “…his latest book, is a serious survey of recent academic literature on corporate and capital-markets behavior, supported by his own fresh research, all synthesized into a set of digestible principles for corporate managers seeking to cultivate healthy and mutually beneficial relations with investors and analysts.” – Barron’s

“5/5…Every board member should read this book.” — Professional Manager magazine

“Lev’s wisdom is pithy and profound.” — Business Outlook India

“this is a very good book indeed with real practical application.” “It’s worth a look.” - Investor Relations Society

About the Author

Baruch Lev is the Philip Bardes Professor of Accounting and Finance at New York University’s Stern School of Business and the director of both the Vincent C. Ross Institute for Accounting Research and the Project for Research on Intangibles. He is a permanent visitor at École Nationale Des Ponts and Chaussées (Paris) and City University Business School (London).

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 6 customer reviews
An excellent book for both scholars and practitioners.
Finance professor
It is also packed with practical suggestions as to how managers can improve communications with investors.
Dan Gode
And... it's both thoroughly researched and referenced, and smoothly written!
kitode

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dan Gode on December 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The book deals with an important topic about which there are few, if any, other books written by prominent academics. The book is full of interesting empirical observations that dispel some of the popular myths regarding investor behavior. It is also packed with practical suggestions as to how managers can improve communications with investors. The suggestions deal with substance, not style. The content is based on analysis, not anecdotal stories.

The author has a clear writing style and is bold in making recommendations. This is in sharp contrast to books where the authors are afraid to state their positions succinctly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brad Loncar on November 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is truly one of the best investment books I've ever read (and I read a lot of them). As an investor, I really hope a lot of corporate managers read this book because it very accuratly depicts what investors are looking for: honesty, transparency, steady growth. Dr. Lev has done a great job of quantifying these things and showing how they do impact your performance over the long-run. Excellent, excellent book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By investingbythebooks on April 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a solid book. It's not an investor relations handbook but rather an experienced professor giving advice to CEOs and corporate managers on how to view and handle the stock market. Baruch Lev is a professor in accounting and finance at Stern School of Business. He has also held positions at the University of Chicago, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University and Berkeley. With five books and over a hundred published studies in leading journals, Lev is a very seasoned advisor to have by your side. The chapters are structured into three main parts where the author first discusses how to handle investor related emergencies such as when results miss consensus earnings, informing investors of adverse news etc. Secondly, Lev addresses the topic of how to earn the trust of investors and finally a number of real or perceived conflicts between owners and managers are analysed. The latter two parts are better than the first.

Out of the text's many discussions I think I appreciated the one on how to handle corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues the most. Managers or not, most people strive to follow the informal motto of Google; "don't be evil" and within the corporate sector, as the author points out, the CSR movement has won the battle of ideas. Hence CSR issues must be addressed by management. At the same time the thought that companies should serve all stakeholders, not only shareholders, poses a problem. As professor Michael Jensen so eloquently puts it "It is logically impossible to maximize in more than one dimension at the same time ... whereas [shareholder] value maximization provides corporate managers with a single objective, stakeholder theory directs corporate managers to serve `many masters.' And ... when there are many masters, all end up being shortchanged.
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