Customer Reviews


175 Reviews
5 star:
 (116)
4 star:
 (37)
3 star:
 (11)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (7)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


307 of 315 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for beginners, a great refresher for veterans
I agree with about everyone else that this book should be read in conjunction with Sklansky and Malmuth's "For Advanced Players", however, IT SHOULD BE READ(and read and read etc.)! I have read alot of highbrow criticism of this book from the glut of poker know-it-alls, some of it blatantly false, but I just simply disagree with it and I believe you will too if...
Published on November 10, 2003

versus
38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars First Time At A Table
When first learning about hold-em poker I bought this book along with a few others. This book is definitely geared towards someone who has little or no knowledge of hold-em poker at all. If you have played, know the rules, and the very basics of play, then this book probably won't add much. I've found the 1st Sklansky book on hold-em poker to be the best starter book...
Published on December 18, 2001


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

307 of 315 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for beginners, a great refresher for veterans, November 10, 2003
By A Customer
I agree with about everyone else that this book should be read in conjunction with Sklansky and Malmuth's "For Advanced Players", however, IT SHOULD BE READ(and read and read etc.)! I have read alot of highbrow criticism of this book from the glut of poker know-it-alls, some of it blatantly false, but I just simply disagree with it and I believe you will too if you read this book.
This is a book on solid, winning low limit hold'em , not middle or high-limit, and what it teaches is right on for the 4-8 game I play. I believe many Sklansky worshipers are offended that anyone would dare attempt a competing book on the subject of Texas Hold'em, but even Lee Jones says in this book that "Sklansky & Malmuth have written the definitive text on medium limit hold'em.", therefore, that is not what this book is about. Plus, if you find yourself reading Sklansky, but not quite understanding it, this book will provide a little light. It will help you understand more advanced books when you are ready for them.
It does not contain some of the more advanced poker strategy and theory because that does not work in typical loose/passive low-limit games, period. And if you try those advances strategies at this level, it may end up costing you and not your opponent. Naturally, as you would with any book, you will have to tweak certain recomendations and tactics to fit the specific game you are playing in, but if you don't have the flexibility to do that and find yourself playing like a robot, any book you read will be of little, if any, benefit to you.
One reviewer, "gbroulet", said the following, which should be seared into our brains: "When I played chess I collected a vast collection of chess books. After a couple of years I realized two things, 1. many of these books were saying the same things in different ways. And 2. My skill level would improve faster if I stuck to just one or 2 books and really studied them instead of reading many concepts from many different books." I did the exact same thing with chess books several years ago and came to the exact same conclusion. I actually got worse the more I studied because I was learning more and more theory and general principles, but no application. Poker is all about application, and so is this book. Do not buy every poker book out there and read them all half-heartedly, rather buy a few good ones and study them over and over and over, and apply what you learn. This should be one of those books.
This book is very basic, but that is what makes it unique compared to the many other books out there. No one is hurt by a thorough study, or re-study, of the basics. If you try to learn advanced poker theory without a thorough knowledge of the fundamentals, you will find yourself getting confused, or worse, you may get it flat wrong and that will cost you dearly. The information in this book will make you a better player whether you apply all his recommendations or not. I highly recommend it to any hold'em player, novice or not.
One caveat, I have read several reviews complaining that this book has hurt their internet poker playing. As we all know, low-limit internet poker with fake money is a fun, but often unrealistic version of poker. People will stay to the river with slim draws and hit them a surprising amount of times. I have hit them myself alot more in internet poker than in real poker. This book is not about low-limit fake money internet poker, so buy another book on that. That is truly is a different world.
I also recommend "Improve your Poker" by Bob Ciaffone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


151 of 155 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He called it "low-limit" because..., January 8, 2002
By 
John M. Thompson (Albuquerque, New Mexico) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
...most players can't stomach being called beginners, novices or newbies, and the bottom line is that it's true. Otherwise, it would probably pose much more difficulty for me to make money in my home games.
In reference to some of the idiocies posted below, a game played for relatively small betting increments could possibly have players of significant skill and ferocity, or cheaters who will use tricks to get your money. Jones points out that in moving past $10 big bets, you need a new set of skills. However, you should be able to know when you're making too many uncertain decisions, against players that you don't know you can beat. Selection of the right game is the first assessment any player should make, and it just happens that people are less likely to be skilled or cheaters at low levels because the stakes don't justify it.
I've read most of the significant works on poker in general, and Hold'Em in specific. Lee Jones basically writes the most accessible book on Hold'Em: he discusses starting standards, position, betting for value, and play of the straight and flush draw in Hold'Em. The worst that I can say (having read David Sklansky's first and second books on Hold'Em in addition to _The Theory of Poker_, plus Bobby Baldwin and Doyle Brunson's sections on Limit and No-Limit in _Super/System_) is that he doesn't necessarily show you all of the mathematics behind the principles, or give you helpful anecdotes to frame the lessons in your mind. If you like playing the game, you can buy those too.
The wisdom from each book on the game really doesn't change that much. Play fewer hands. Play bigger cards. Tighten up when you're the first to bet, and play draws from the blinds. Each one has a different way of communicating their insights to you, but Lee Jones does so in a conversational, easily remembered way - and the difference will show in your game.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


73 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book that presents ideas well, July 30, 2003
By 
GB Guitars "gbroulet" (Colfax, Ca United States) - See all my reviews
If you're ready to start playing Hold'em poker online or at the tables for real money then you need to read this FIRST. In fact, let me give you some free advice that I learned from playing tournament level chess.
When I played chess I collected a vast collection of chess books. After a couple of years I realized two things, 1. many of these books were saying the same things in different ways. And 2. My skill level would improve faster if I stuck to just one or 2 books and really studied them instead of reading many concepts from many different books.
So how does that relate to poker? This book and Hold 'Em Poker by David Sklansky are the 2 books you want to buy and then REALLY study. Sklansky's book is wonderfull but some concepts are presented in a general way which he then expects you to logically expand into a working poker strategy. Jones's book breaks that logic down into very simple lines of tactics.
Sklansy's book tells you that your position in relation to the dealer button is important and gives a few examples. Jones's book breaks this down into chapters like "Playing Before the Flop in the early position", "Playing Before the Flop in the middle position" and "Playing Before the Flop in the late position". He's not saying anything that Sklansky doesn't, he's just presenting it in easier to understand chunks.
Another thing I like about Jones's book is the discussion of starting hands. Sklansky gives a great table of starting hands and groups of hands. But rather than trying to memorize 65 hands broken down into 8 groups Jones simply tells you "Here are the 12 hands you should play in this position". As your position improves you can play hands that are less strong, and he shows you exactly which hands to add. He even has a great chapter on "trash hands" and how to avoid them.
So does it work? Well, I was doing well after reading Sklanskey's book, but my fluctuations were fairly large. I'd win big, but then I'd lose big. After reading Jones's book I had a clearer idea of what Sklasky was trying to teach. On my next few sessions of poker when the cards were going against me I probably only played 12 hands out of 250 hands or so. But I stayed even. When the cards were on my side I knew how to maximize my hand. My winnings fluctuated much less. In fact, I was either holding even or winning.
So study both books. Read them both cover to cover and then read them again. Memorize Jones's starting hands and then go back to the book to refresh your memory. When you feel you have the low limit games well understood then it's time to buy Sklansky and Malmuth's book "Advanced Hold'em Poker". But buy, study, and use what you learn in this book first!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding - a clear, concise guide to Hold 'Em, August 30, 1999
By A Customer
A terrific intermediate book for those that have played Hold 'Em but are a long way from "pot limit" much less "no limit" Hold 'Em. Easy to read, well written and to the point - I read most of it in a day. This was the perfect book for the regular low limit game that I'm in where most players go to the flop and it's next to impossible (if not pointless) to try and bluff since the stakes are so low and invariably someone will call you just to "keep you honest." High stakes "no limit" Hold 'Em is a totally different animal and a game most of us will not play - why spend hours reading Sklanksy when I could be playing low limit Hold 'Em with my friends instead? Besides, there's plenty of complexities to the game that are covered in this book that will keep me busy for some time. This is also a good introduction to the "spread limit" games in casinos and card clubs. These can be pretty intimidating and it's good to get a briefing from Lee Jones before I sit down at a table in Vegas with a bunch of strangers and a surly dealer. Excellent reference, highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's really as good as everyone says, June 23, 2004
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First I'll mention the one potential negative: this book may seem a bit short. The whole thing is right at 200 pages, but Section II which makes up the "meat" of the text is only 110. But it packs a lot of information into those 110 pages!

This book is a manual of how to handle practically every situation that might confront you in a hand of low-limit hold 'em. It starts with the usual recommendations of tight play preflop, but gives specifics for the different positions (including the often omitted blind positions). Then it moves on to the specifics of play on the flop with different situations -"when you flopped top pair with a good kicker" (or a mediocre one!), "when you have two overcards", "when you have a straight or flush draw", etc. Finally he includes some material on how to play the turn and the river, although much of that is a natural extension of how you played the flop so those sections are much shorter. Most importantly, all of these are tailored for "no-fold-em" Hold 'Em games where many people will be seeing the flop, where it's likely your opponent will hold something crazy like 8-5 offsuit, and where bluffing is nearly useless because there's always someone who'll call you down "almost out of curiosity."

Jones' book is a marked contrast to others that claim to include material for beginners but teach you tactics for higher-stakes games (I've got Phil Hellmuth's _Play Poker Like the Pros_ with its emphasis on aggressive bluffing in mind here). This book does exactly what its title implies: it teaches you how to win at the low limits.

UPDATE: I see at least one review on here, by TorontoMan, referring to sit-and-go content. If you buy a used copy of the 2nd edition you will *not* get this content as it was added for the 3rd edition. Buying a used copy of WLLH 2nd ed. should be fine as long as you want to learn low LIMIT (not low-stakes no-limit) ring game hold 'em.

Jones did make a few tweaks in the content for the 3rd edition, mostly in response to accusations he was teaching "weak-tight" play, that is, teaching players to fold too often when they might have the best hand. Keep in mind that in a big pot at limit poker, you need to be really really really sure you're beaten to fold. (When you finish this book you should move on to Miller's Small Stakes Hold 'em and you'll get this point preached at you some more.) Keep that in mind and you'll be fine with this 2nd edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Beginner Book, July 29, 2003
By A Customer
Jones explains in simple terms important concepts: Pre-flop and post flop play, bankroll management and paitence, that are necessary to survive in the sometimes insane low limit hold-em games. Since I bought the book, my number of winning sessions dramatically increased. I attribute this success on Jones teaching me to fold far more hands than I ever did in the past, especially pre-flop. Many hands that I thought were playable were proven to me to be losers. I almost never lose hands on the river anymore. Any novice who wants to begin playing Hold'em after watching the WPT this Summer should read this book at least twice before they sit down at any table. The most important skill that this book taught me was the ability to spot weak players and to exploit them for profit. Knowing who was weak gave me a huge advantage over them which can only add the the profit margin. His theory on why bluffing doen't pay in low limit is interesting and after playing many low limit games, I agree with it wholeheartedly. Word of warning: If you plan on playing tournaments, this book is not for you. Traditional play and Tournament play require completely different skill sets that are beyond the scope of this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute must-have for low-limit hold'em players, January 14, 2004
By A Customer
If you're looking for a book that will teach you how to make a living playing poker, or a book that will explain to you how to read your opponents at the table, or a book that will teach you how to play with the big boys, look somewhere else.
However, if you're somewhat new (less than 5 years) to the world of hold'em and casino poker and typically find yourself playing in the $2/$4 - $5/$10 hold'em games, then you should read this book.
Jones clearly lays out the reasoning for his strategy, which you will find is one of much looser play than if you simply follow 'standard' hold'em strategy as laid out in "Hold'em Excellence" by Lou Krieger and other common texts. Jones recommends playing low, suited connectors in almost any position, for instance.
Yes, the book is somewhat basic, but that is no reason to pan it. People playing $3/$6 games need to start with the basics and practice with the basics before they jump to the $20/$40 game which is played differently. You have to realize that a $2 raise pre-flop isn't going to get anyone with 2-7 offsuit to fold if they've already called the blinds! You have to adjust your strategy to fit your opponents at a low-limit table, and that is just what Jones addresses. No one can beat the rake at a low-limit table without a tremendous amount of luck, and Jones doesn't pretend to tell you how.
The upshot: if you're playing in low-limit games, read this book before moving on to more advanced books or higher limit games. You won't be sorry. He'll probably tell you some things you already know, but it never hurts to listen again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Advice, December 21, 2001
By A Customer
I had never played hold 'em until playing one night with some friends, who later referred me to an internet poker site. I played the play money tables for a while there but felt this wasn't as realistic since virtually everyone stayed in & raised excessively at the play money game.
My first experience with internet poker for real money resulted in my losing ($$$)in two different sessions (I made two separate ($$$) deposits last for approximately 20-25 hours playing time at the .50-$1 tables).
Then, after reading Jones' book & following the advice therein - I have now turned ($$$) into ($$$) & am still playing on that. (...) Three months prior I had never even played hold 'em. Hopefully, I'm on my way to establishing a reasonable bankroll & will be "cashing out" not "depositing in" from here on out, but I know I have a ways to go before reaching the higher levels.
Jones explains many of the fundamental hold 'em & poker concepts very well and I really liked the way he organized the sections of the book. I feel I now have a more solid foundation for future learning & a more sensible approach to advance in the game.
I highly recommend this book to all hold em players who have never done anything but just "wing it" before.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Learn Hold'Em Acceptably Well in 24 Hours, August 14, 2004
By 
darrelv (North Carolina) - See all my reviews
This book can teach you to play hold'em in as little as 24 hours. It

will not teach you how to play *well* even in a lifetime.

Quite simply, the book instructs the reader exactly which cards to

play and how to play them. The only problem is the instructions are

valid only for certain game conditions. Fortunately, the assumed

conditions are popular in low limit games. Also fortunate, enough

caution is urged to ensure that any mistakes made are not costly.

This book is for low fixed-limit, full, ring games. It is not for

no-limit or pot-limit. It is not for games with seven or fewer

players. It is not for tournaments.

You cannot make a mistake buying this as your first hold'em book. You

can make a mistake thinking it applies to every game and that there is

nothing else to learn.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars First Time At A Table, December 18, 2001
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
When first learning about hold-em poker I bought this book along with a few others. This book is definitely geared towards someone who has little or no knowledge of hold-em poker at all. If you have played, know the rules, and the very basics of play, then this book probably won't add much. I've found the 1st Sklansky book on hold-em poker to be the best starter book. It's compact, but the ideas presented are immediately applicable and usefull. It provides basics of strategy on plays you can make, and also makes you aware of plays your opponent might be making on you. The Jones book is more basic, guiding someone through the first steps of the rules of hold em and playing at a table. Good for an absolute beginner, but for someone who has played even a little, probably not enough new info.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Winning Low-Limit Hold'em
Winning Low-Limit Hold'em by Lee Jones (Paperback - June 15, 2005)
$24.95 $18.93
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.