Winning the Peace and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $5.96 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Romy's Place
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Minimal shelf wear. Clean pages.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Winning the Peace: The Marshall Plan and America's Coming of Age as a Superpower Hardcover – January 1, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.99
$12.99 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
Showcase%20Weekly%20Deal


Frequently Bought Together

Winning the Peace: The Marshall Plan and America's Coming of Age as a Superpower + The Most Noble Adventure: The Marshall Plan and How America Helped Rebuild Europe + The Marshall Plan: America, Britain and the Reconstruction of Western Europe, 1947-1952 (Studies in Economic History and Policy: USA in the Twentieth Century)
Price for all three: $95.04

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (January 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470097558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470097557
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.1 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #371,123 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

During the spring of 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall promulgated what would come to be known as the Marshall Plan: a proposal to spend up to $20 billion to restore the infrastructure and economies of Europe, then still foundering in recession and poverty after the ravages of WWII. As Mills, American studies professor at Sarah Lawrence, shows in this elegant study, the plan not only offered relief but brought about a degree of European unity by forcing countries to work in concert to mend their fractured continent. The U.S. mostly refrained from influencing specific solutions, an approach that Mills argues the present administration should think about adopting today. The plan worked to the advantage of the United States as much as it worked to the advantage of noncommunist Europe: much of the economic aid supplied was to be used to purchase American merchandise, and legislation required that this merchandise travel on U.S. merchant vessels. Six years after Marshall's first proposal, the U.S. had invested some $13 billion, and virtually all of Western Europe stood restored. This overview covers a complex subject straightforwardly and well. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

* Tracing the history and intended goals of the Marshall Plan (1947)—named for its primary creator, Secretary of State George C. Marshall—Mills passionately argues that it was a successful nation-building tool that offers many lessons for the United States today. According to Mills (American studies, Sarah Lawrence Coll.), Marshall emphasized that American aid after World War II should not be used against nations but against ""forces that deprived people of their dignity."" His goal was to help revive the economies of Europe, creating stable political and social units that would facilitate the existence of free institutions. In this, Mills declares the Marshall Plan a success in that it supplied Europe with ""a crucial margin of aid"" that enabled it to recover without slashing needed welfare programs or reducing wages. In other words, the Marshall Plan was Europe's New Deal, providing the foundation for a stable Europe that would include Germany in its economic center. Well written, engaging, and likely to be considered controversial owing to its praise of the plan, Mill's book should promote discussion, especially in light of current events. Recommended for academic and larger public library collections.
—Patti C. McCall, AMRI, Albany, NY (Library Journal, February 15, 2008)

During the spring of 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall promulgated what would come to be known as the Marshall Plan: a proposal to spend up to $20 billion to restore the infrastructure and economies of Europe, then still foundering in recession and poverty after the ravages of WWII. As Mills, American studies professor at Sarah Lawrence, shows in this elegant study, the plan not only offered relief but brought about a degree of European unity by forcing countries to work in concert to mend their fractured continent. The U.S. mostly refrained from influencing specific solutions, an approach that Mills argues the present administration should think about adopting today. The plan worked to the advantage of the United States as much as it worked to the advantage of noncommunist Europe: much of the economic aid supplied was to be used to purchase American merchandise, and legislation required that this merchandise travel on U.S. merchant vessels. Six years after Marshall’s first proposal, the U.S. had invested some $13 billion, and virtually all of Western Europe stood restored. This overview covers a complex subject straightforwardly and well. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, November 26, 2007)


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bally Scotsman on June 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This treatise of the post-WWII European Recovery Plan, commonly referred to as the Marshall Plan, could easily have been half the length with no appreciable loss of depth or detail. The reader's patience is tested as early as the introduction, which itself only to restates the preface, whilst the first chapter proper merely recapitulates what has already been said twice before.

Prior to dealing with the Plan itself, the author provides several chapters of background history which, though not unwelcome, eventually become tiresome by dint of unflagging repetition of a few basic ideas, as well as a pedantic tendency to spell out full names and titles, when, following their first appearance in the text, a surname, abbreviation, or acronym would have sufficed.

By the time we reach the Plan in action, we are three-quarters into the book; consequently the Plan's implementation and ramifications receive rather less attention than do its origins, rationale, and political gestation. One feels that, given the preponderance of background, the foreground would have been more imposing.

Although the author's prose reads quite rapidly, especially if one skims rapidly though the various bureaucratic nomenclature and suchlike, one soon becomes irritated at the recurrence of certain pet phrases such as "breeding ground for communism" (three times in one paragraph on p26) or "America's coming of age as a superpower" (also the book's sub-title). Indeed, the term "Marshall Plan" is itself repeated to the point of cliche, often in congested proximity to persons named Marshall. This lends the entire text a certain amateurish quality reminiscent of many a typical student paper unperturbed by such matters of style.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thomas A. Fenton on October 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am not sure what turned other reviewers off, but I found nothing of their complaints in this book.

Nicholas Mills has presented an excellent discussion of the Marshall Plan, its importance, value, origins, problems, successes and failures. Since with my review, there will be four reviews with four different ratings, I suggest the potential reader visit the library and check the book out. In my opinion, my money and time were both well spent in reading this work.

At the age of 66, my interest in history has deepened in the past five years. Few of the books I have read in that time period (there have been over 200 others following the death of my wife) have been as informative and educational as Mills' work. If you have an interest in what happened after WW II, why 67 years later we still have not had a repeat of the world-wide magnitude of WW I & II although there have been many smaller ones, why we really ought to have learned our lesson with the first two, and why we should literally pray to God that we have the sense to never do that again, you need to read this book. I make reference to prayer not irreverently but seriously, because the next time we might not have a George Marshall with the credibility and persuasiveness to convince America to implement a similar program.

I am a Vietnam veteran, a retired Baptist pastor, and deeply believe in peace, but if America is attacked (again, as in 1941 and 2001) I will volunteer to defend my nation with my life. I know the truth of the statement "War is Hell", but I never realized just how much truth is in that statement until I read what WW II did to Europe.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Vanderweide on July 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mercifully free of statistics, well-written and not bogged down in minutiae or taking too wide a view: that's the strength of Winning the Peace.

Mills sticks to telling the story of how George Marshall pitched and sold the Marshall plan both in America and Europe; about two-thirds of the book describe events prior to the events from just prior to Marshall's 1947 Harvard commencement speech to the passage of the Economic Recovery Program in 1948. (The other third addresses the implementation of the ERP and its eventual folding into European rearmament programs.)

In that sense, this book is primarily an homage to Marshall, arguably one of America's least-heralded, but greatest, statesmen.

It does contain some glaring omissions.

For example, there are no plates -- not even a single decent photograph of Marshall -- which seems inexcusable.

Mills barely touches on the (admittedly few and feeble) programs in place to aid Europe immediately after the war, except for a sweeping condemnation of them as collectively ineffective (which is true enough, but an examination of why seems to be in order).

While Mills does keep the numbers to a minimum (and there's not a chart in sight anywhere), it doesn't help his case when he refutes some modern thinking on whether the Marshall plan was effective, or even needed. Context is called for here, but we get none.

Aside from these annoyances, Mills makes a very strong case that the Marshall plan was an unqualified success not in terms of its financial levels, but in re-establishing the ability of Europeans to trade with one another, and in getting past age-old animosities and making Western Europe more reliant upon one another, thus guaranteeing peace.

Overall, an excellent introduction to the Marshall plan and a reminder of how fortunate America was to have George Marshall, when he was needed most.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images