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Winter in Eden (Eden Trilogy) Paperback – January 30, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Eden Trilogy
  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: I Books (January 30, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743412915
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743412919
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,795,559 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An exciting adventure into a 'what if' world. A brilliant work of creative imagination, one that rivals in conception, scope, and execution of plot Jean Auel's bestselling novels".-- The Nashville Banner

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on October 27, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It is extremely rare that a sequel equals the original for obvious reasons: (1) If the author does not emphasize character then he/she must rely on the novelty of the original work to carry forth of introduce still more novelty or (2) If the author does emphasize character then the reader is usually all too familiar with their lives.
Harrison solves this by limiting the material offered to the reader on the humans in the first novel. Throughout the series he has tried to remain factually or scientifically correct such as the idea that huge dinosaurs could have never developed the brain size or build the structures required for their use and that without the devastating asteroid dinosaurs would have remained the rulers of Earth.
We continue our adventures of the "human boy" who interacts with the dinosaur culture. The dinosaurs are, in the end, simply prototypes of humans in their emotional and ethical outlook - some are good, others bad. This is a good read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Floyd Blanchard on July 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While I'm not a hardcore sci-fi fan,I was totally blown away by the concept of the "West of Eden" series. I especially liked book II..."Winter in Eden". This story really became a character study for heros. While there is one main character throughout the series, in book II the focus quickly gets shifted to a female,(our main character's mate) and forget everything you ever knew about heros!This woman is devoted to her mate, and will do anything to maintain their family's well being. Some of the situations faced by these characters is a true testament to human endurance. The very idea that nomadic tribes could exist under some of the conditions described with-in the pages of this gripping story still give me shivers, and I fully intend to read this wonderful series again. Mr. Harrison is truly one of my favorite Authors.
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By A Customer on May 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book better than the first. Maybe it's the development of the story, or just revisiting an incredible alternative world. Harrison is a master storyteller and the concept of dinosaurs not going extinct, and making slaves of humans, is mind-boggling. Like other readers, I wish the series were longer.

Happily, I have found another series that is remarkably similar: the Dinosaur Wars series byThomas Hopp. Written recently, they have one advantage over the Eden books. The intelligent human-sized dinosaurs are feathered and bird-like. This is more realistic according to modern science, but Harrison couldn't have known what would later be discovered in China while he was writing of scaly, almost amphibian dinosaurs in these books. Ah, well, everything evolves, including our view of what an intelligent dinosaur might be like. Also, Hopp writes of dinosaurs returning to the present-day world we live in, not an alternative. So there are some cool tank battles and cruise missile counterattacks. Again, an evolution of Harrison's concept.

Hooray for both authors. Long live the subgenre!
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By Avid Reader on October 23, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It is extremely rare that a sequel equals the original for obvious reasons: (1) If the author does not emphasize character then he/she must rely on the novelty of the original work to carry forth of introduce still more novelty or (2) If the author does emphasize character then the reader is usually all too familiar with their lives.
Harrison solves this by limiting the material offered to the reader on the humans in the first novel. Throughout the series he has tried to remain factually or scientifically correct such as the idea that huge dinosaurs could have never developed the brain size or build the structures required for their use and that without the devastating asteroid dinosaurs would have remained the rulers of Earth.
We continue our adventures of the "human boy" who interacts with the dinosaur culture. The dinosaurs are, in the end, simply prototypes of humans in their emotional and ethical outlook - some are good, others bad. This is a good read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Favro on August 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
It is a real shame that this series is out of print because I fell in love with it. Now all you can get is the first in the series (West of Eden). This story is along the lines of Tarzan with some Battlefield Earth in there, if I had to compare it to anything. I read this series when I was sixteen in hawaii. I couldn't put it down and don't remember anything else about the trip. But I'll never forget these three books. The characters and story were simply gripping. I would encourage anyone interested in an epic alternate world journey to grab a copy of West of Eden then hope you can hunt down the rest of the books. It's worth it!
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By john J. hanafin on February 17, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Harrison is in the same class as Farmer and Vance. I didn't think I would find another writer to match these two, but H. H. certainly does.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Harrison's 3-part Eden series is one of the teasures of SF. Set in a world where dynasaurs were not wiped out, but evolved into the intelligent dominant rulers of the world, with scientific knowledge (particularly in the biological sciences), the saga tells of the interactions between the humans who are dominated by the rulers of earth. Switching scenese between the advanced, female-dominated culture of the 'saurs and the stone-age level humans who are their enemies, Harrison invents a detailed world of fascination, cultural differences which make for outstanding commentary on the "real world" and unforgettable characters. Just fabulous.
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