Engineering & Transportation
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $4.93 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 28? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Winter: Notes from Montana Paperback


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.02
$4.91 $0.01 $7.20

Frequently Bought Together

Winter: Notes from  Montana + The Book of Yaak + The Ninemile Wolves
Price for all three: $36.04

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Reprint edition (January 20, 1922)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395611504
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395611500
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #622,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bass and his friend Elizabeth Hughes, a painter, spend a winter in a secluded former hunting lodge in northwest Montana's Yaak valley. "This charming celebration will give readers a fresh perception of winter," said PW. Illustrated.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

In this journal of a back-country winter, Bass is working in the tradition of Walden. Wishing to confront the essentials of nature and self, he heads for the most remote place he can find--the Yaak valley of Montana, with its 30 inhabitants and lack of electricity. The journal focuses on his adaptation to the harsh climate, stressing his growing knowledge of backwoods skills and lore. Unfortunately, Bass rarely goes beyond recording daily tasks and encounters. He conveys little insight into the spiritual changes he is undergoing and has surprisingly little to say about the relation of man and nature. His writing has been compared to that of Annie Dillard and Peter Matthiessen, but these flat, sketchy accounts belie such comparisons. In the end, "notes" is an all-too-appropriate subtitle for this disappointing volume, which often seems like the skeleton of a more substantial work.
-Lawrence Rungren, Bedford Free P.L., Mass.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
22
4 star
11
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
4
See all 41 customer reviews
Overall I think this book is a must read for anyone who likes outdoor settings, and a good true story.
Joe Pregler
Rick Bass transports the reader to a remote valley in Montana and convincingly portrays his love and affection for all things wild and natural.
Johnny J
I like him so much tho he's not a people person I just may look him up next time I go thru Musoulla, MT..
S. Hall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Johnny J on August 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
Rick Bass transports the reader to a remote valley in Montana and convincingly portrays his love and affection for all things wild and natural. This testament to the environment never preaches yet may be one of the most powerful arguments to preserve that which is still wild. It calms the mind and stirs the spirit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Rick Bass is a gifted author with an amazing ability to make simple pleasures (like watching the snow fall) sound irresistible to even the most restless souls. "Winter" is effortlessly my favorite book of all time; a masterpiece of time and solitude. Often while reading the book, I almost want to sell everything and go off to Montana, cut wood, take great adventurous hikes and happily watch the snow fall for an entire day. We're missing the point of life - Rick Bass has captured it in this important book. Anyone who enjoyed Bryson's "A Walk In The Woods" should not miss this superior classic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tricia S. on February 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
Winter (notes from Montana) written by Rick Bass, captivates his audience with his new favorite season of the year. "I watch individual flakes; I peer up through the snow and see the blank infinity from which it comes; I listen to the special silence it creates."(p.90) Bass journals about his experiences with his girlfriend, Elizabeth Hughes, who is also an artist for the book Winter. Bass and Hughes are from Mississippi and try to make Yaak valley, near the Canadian border, their new beloved home. Winter touches on the many hardships of living with nature such as cutting wood to keep warm and being able to repair anything that breaks because there is no one else to help you out. Bass's emotions of excitement in experiencing his first winter are well written, as well as his sadness to see winter melt away.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary S. Klein on February 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
There is something enchanting and mystical about new fallen snow. However, along with its beauty comes danger and isolation. Winter is comprised of journal entries written by Rick Bass as he and his girlfriend, Elizabeth Hughes, experience their first winter in the northern most part of the country, Yaak Valley, Montana. In the beginning of the book, the author writes about his anticipation of winter. As you read each journal entry, you find yourself enthralled in the author's excitement. When the snow finally comes, there isn't disappointment like there sometimes is when a person looks forward to an event. Bass finds a whole new world in Yaak Valley and to him each snow fall is an event. You can feel his excitement when he writes, "Perhaps all the snow in the world will fall, burying everything, such silence, and then I will come out of it in the spring, different, cleaner, not born again so much as built up." (Page 103)
Living in this remote valley with no prior experience of deadly winters, the author sometimes makes light of how truly dangerous the winter can be. He writes about men taking the safety devices off their chain saws so they can cut trees faster. He mentions dangerous wind chills of 80 degrees below zero. At one point in his writing, he describes how he found Hughes standing outside in her nightgown when he came home from cutting wood. She had been standing very close to the fireplace in order to keep warm and her flannel nightgown caught on fire. You can't help wonder just how many accidents occur, however, Bass brushes over them very lightly in his romantic love affair with the snow. The author paints a vivid picture of the local bar, the Dirty Shame Saloon.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Long on February 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
Winter (notes from Montana) takes place in the Yaak River Valley of Montana in the late 1980's. Rick Bass's riveting journal transports the reader to this remote area and helps to involve the reader in his transformation from dependence upon civilization to the ability to appreciate solitude. The sporadic entries enable the reader to see the changes that are taking place in the author more readily than he sees them. "I suppose I was pretending that I had always realized what I needed-deep, dark woods and quietness, a slowness-and that I hadn't been floundering for thirty years trying to figure this out, trying to get along in the cities, trying to move fast. He was right, though. I have changed. I can take apart a generator and put it back together. I can file a saw. My heart has changed too. I'm in less of a hurry." (p. 161). Bass finally begins to see that by learning to depend on nature and himself, he is learning that what we think we need is not always the best for us. This book is an excellent piece to help readers appreciate the life of convenience but also envy the simpler life Bass is living in Yaak.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By V. Marshall VINE VOICE on June 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
Rick Bass is one of my favorite writers and in my opinion deserves much more attention.
This book is a memoir of his first years in Yaak, Montana with his wife Elizabeth. They move from the city to a small cabin in the Montana wilderness. It is a beautifully written tribute to a world no longer in demand where the sound of silence feels too loud. Bass finds out just how little he actually knows, a marvelous experience in humility, once he encounters the harshness of winter. He writes about snow being strong and silent in the same breath. He discovers a new life where he only needs bare essentials to survive and soon finds that all other existence seems superficial. He writes in a style like no other man I have ever read almost poetic but not overdone, and like Walden, he suggests that tremendous value exists in the wilderness away from a roaring crowd.
If you love nature and the idea of healing such as that found in solitude this book is for you. Bass writes so wonderfully that your senses are taken along with him on his various wilderness excursions for life's rations. My favorite passage is on page 81, on which he describes a lone male moose, "He broke into the smoothest of gallops, a lazy, long legged floating. His wide antlers could have held a tea service without spilling a drop, so smooth and level was his gait." How many men do you know who would think of a tea service and not a loaded gun upon seeing a magnificent male moose? This is where I find Rick Bass so appealing; in all his male machismo he finds the subtle intricacies of art in nature and has the ability to describe it all magically.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa4e8a5dc)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?