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Wintersmith (Discworld) Paperback


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Wintersmith (Discworld) + I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld) + A Hat Full of Sky: The Continuing Adventures of Tiffany Aching and the Wee Free Men
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Product Details

  • Series: Discworld (Book 35)
  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (October 2, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060890339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060890339
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 2.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (170 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 6 Up–Winter must die, and Summer must sink into the ground; it is all part of the Story, and Tiffany Aching has danced into the middle of it. On the last day of autumn, Tiffany travels to the woods to witness the Black Morris, the traditional dance of the gods heralding the arrival of winter. In a moment of heedless excitement, her rollicking feet draw her to the music, and she crashes headlong into the Wintersmith. He is fascinated by the girl and proceeds to court her in his own fashion–all the snowflakes are made in her image and giant Tiffany-shaped icebergs appear in the sea. Meanwhile, Tiffany begins to show characteristics of the goddess Summer–the touch of her bare feet makes things grow. All the attention from the Wintersmith would be quite flattering were it not for the deadly winter that threatens the shepherds of the Chalk. As the situation is very dangerous and death is certain, the Nac Mac Feegles (along with an especially lively cheese named Horace) are directly in the fray protecting their big wee hag along with Annagramma, Granny Weatherwax, Miss Tick, and other favorites from past adventures. All are skillfully characterized; even the Wintersmith elicits sympathy as he joyfully buries the world in snow in his attempt to win Tiffany. Replete with dry and intelligent humor, this latest in the series is sure to delight.–Heather M. Campbell, Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Here's the third Discworld story for younger readers in a series that began with The Wee Free Men (2003) and continued in A Hat Full of Sky (2004). Despite a stern warning from Miss Treason, the eccentric witch from whom 13-year-old Tiffany Aching is learning her craft, the girl has gone and danced with the wrong men. Having inserted herself into a dark reverse Morris dance in which summer and winter achieve their seasonal balance, Tiffany has attracted the amorous attentions of the Wintersmith. To express his ardor, he brings his chilly powers to bear, replete with Tiffany-shaped snowflakes burying the world in the rising drifts of his infatuation. While Granny Weatherwax, Miss Perspicacia Tick, and sundry veteran witches work with Tiffany to restrain the Wintersmith's zeal, the Wee Free Men set off to fetch a Hero to assist Tiffany, along the way adopting a cantankerous blue cheese. Add an assortment of junior witches-in-training, and yet another rollicking, clever, and quite charming adventure is brought to readers, who will find themselves delighted again--or for the first time--by Pratchett's exuberant storytelling. Holly Koelling
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was fifteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe. Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, including his first Discworld novel, The Color of Magic, in 1983. In 1987 he turned to writing full time, and has not looked back since. To date there are a total of 36 books in the Discworld series, of which four (so far) are written for children. The first of these children's books, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal. A non-Discworld book, Good Omens, his 1990 collaboration with Neil Gaiman, has been a longtime bestseller, and was reissued in hardcover by William Morrow in early 2006 (it is also available as a mass market paperback (Harper Torch, 2006) and trade paperback (Harper Paperbacks, 2006). Terry's latest book, Nation, a non-Discworld standalone YA novel was published in October of 2008 and was an instant New York Times and London Times bestseller. Regarded as one of the most significant contemporary English-language satirists, Pratchett has won numerous literary awards, was named an Officer of the British Empire "for services to literature" in 1998, and has received four honorary doctorates from the Universities of Warwick, Portsmouth, Bath, and Bristol. His acclaimed novels have sold more than 55 million copies (give or take a few million) and have been translated into 36 languages. Terry Pratchett lives in England with his family, and spends too much time at his word processor.  Some of Terry's accolades include: The Carnegie Medal, Locus Awards, the Mythopoetic Award, ALA Notable Books for Children, ALA Best Books for Young Adults, Book Sense 76 Pick, Prometheus Award and the British Fantasy Award.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Rounding out the cast of characters is Wintersmith.
Leonard Fleisig
And it is the third of the Tiffany Aching books, so if you haven't read "Wee Free Men" or "A Hat Full Of Sky", well... What are you waiting for?
Jerry Wright
The story is engaging, funny and even though it is a young adult book it is perfect for all ages.
Cheri Apple

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

171 of 174 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mj Grant on September 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I must start by explaining my circumstances with this book, when I finished A Hat Full of Sky in June, It was hard for me, not going mad for need of a sequel. The need for it was so strong at one point I nearly brought a proof copy, and I never buy proof copies. So I am sure you can understand why I was there on the day Wintersmith was released, and it was REALLY worth the wait. It was far, far better then I thought it ever could be.

I am sure you know the story from Amazon's handy synopsis so I will just tell you what I loved most about it. I loved the romance. I loved the descriptions. I love the sense of subtle menace and fear that managed to even make ME feel scared. It really doesn't read like most Terry Pratchett books, that although full of brilliance tend to get confusing. This although not confusing, was not straightforward either, you may need to read some parts twice to absorb them fully, but on the first read it is a wonderful exhilarating rush of beautiful writing.

All of the characters in this story are developed and explored more, you find out far more about Tiffany here, Tiffany the young woman, rather than Tiffany the rather solemn child. Not facts, just more about her as a person, her character. That's what I love about Tiffany, she feels like a living breathing person. Roland, looses the whining and complaining and grows a spine, and we see what may, just possibly, be a softer side to Esme Weatherwax. And of course there's the Wintersmith. The titular character, and boy is he a worthy subject for a novel, his story is very, very moving, by the time I got to the end I was close to tears. Although he could interpreted as the villain, he is such as sad, tragic character, that you just can't help but feel sorry for him.
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103 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Leonard Fleisig TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
but the fire is so delightful. And since we've no place to go. Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!"

And snow it does in Terry Pratchett's delightfully funny and thoughtful latest book, Wintersmith. I have to admit that I ordered Wintersmith because it was by Terry Pratchett. I did not notice that it is targeted as a Discworld book for younger readers. Adult fans of Discworld or of the genre generally should ignore this fact and step up and read Wintersmith. It is fun and should appeal to "children of all ages!"

The plot is summarized quite nicely in the book description and I won't waste anyone's time repeating that summary. What isn't summarized is Pratchett's way with words and with characterizations. Here we have Tiffany Aching. Not only is she a 13-year girl entering her angst-filled teen years with a lot to learn about becoming an adult, but she is also learning how to become a witch. The witches in Macbeth sum this situation up nicely when they chanted: "double, double, toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble." Pratchett has a keen ear for Tiffany and he manages to convey these pangs of adolescence with an empathy that would be too sweet if it wasn't interspersed with humor and a nod and a wink. Pratchett knows how to keep the cauldron bubbling and those bubbles contain some of Pratchett's famous set-pieces.

The Wee Free Men (the miniature version of Cohen the Barbarian multiplied by a factor of five hundred) provide some of those `fun' moments. Two examples bear repeating. At one point early on Daft Wullie goes on (with more than a wee bit of Scottish brogue) about the problem of being married and having to deal with "the Pursin' o' the Lips", the "Foldin' o' the Arms", and "not tae mention the Tappin' o' the Feets".
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By T. Simons VINE VOICE on October 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
_Wintersmith_ is the latest entry in Pratchett's three-book sub-series about a young witch growing up and learning, appropriately enough for her trade, to be a wise woman. (there are upwards of thirty or forty "Discworld" books total, which cluster into subgroups around individual characters). New readers shouldn't read this one first; start with _Wee Free Men_, the first in Tiffany's sub-series, and then read _A Hat Full of Sky_ before proceeding to this one.

This is billed as a children's book, although little sets it apart from Pratchett's other fantasy except for some slight bowdlerizations for the young reader; primarily, this is a children's book because the heroine is a young person. . It might more properly be billed as a "young adult" book. Like the Harry Potter books, the content and tone of the Tiffany series have been maturing ever so slightly with each book, and Tiffany herself is portrayed as very mature for a child her age - a portrayal deliberate on Pratchett's part, I believe, as Tiffany is exactly as mature as most kids that age tend to think they are, and almost as mature as she herself wants to be.

Tiffany turns thirteen in this book, and puberty is definitely the theme: in the most expert intertwining of story and myth I've yet seen Pratchett accomplish, Tiffany "steps into the dance" between the Summer Lady and "Wintersmith." Accidentally taking on the Summer Lady's role, she becomes subject to the Wintersmith's advances, and as he is the elemental spirit of winter, cold, frost, ice, etc., problems ensue. Pratchett's typical humor is present throughout (at one point, when plants begin to sprout at Tiffany's feet, one practically-minded character gets her to shove her feet into a pot of onion seeds) but the truly impressive thing about this novel is how expertly Pratchett manages to use myth and metaphor to write about a young girl becoming, ahem, fertile, while still maintaining the decorum appropriate to a british children's book.
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