Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Beach House $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Baby Sale

Without Angels

4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1936419371
ISBN-10: 1936419378
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$2.68
Buy new
$15.95
More Buying Choices
4 New from $15.95 7 Used from $2.63
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$15.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Editorial Reviews

Review

Marjorie Stelmach s Without Angels is extraordinary. Original. Her metaphysical imagination stirs and inspires. She combines physics and theology in ways that make sense within both frames of reference. Her lines are beautiful visually and aurally. I am stunned. This is a book to read and read again, then again. She deserves prizes. All the prizes. --Kelly Cherry, author of The Life and Death of Poetry: Poems

I have no words adequate to my astonishment at the poetry of Marjorie Stelmach, and wonder (not for the first time) why our finest poets are not always the best known. Hers is a wisdom scripture for the 21st Century, a ravishing glimpse of our better angels as they depart, a brilliance of language that makes even the gathering dust of our days incandescent. --Eleanor Wilner

About the Author

Marjorie Stelmach is the author of three previous volumes of poems: Night Drawings (awarded the 1994 Marianne Moore Prize), A History of Disappearance, and Bent upon Light (University of Tampa Press). Groups of her poems received the first Missouri Biennial Award and the first Chelsea Award; her awards include the Malahat Review Long Poem Contest and the Stanley Hanks Memorial Prize. A high school English teacher for 30 years, she has also served as visiting poet at the University of Missouri, St. Louis, and, most recently, as the director of the Howard Nemerov Writing Scholars Program at Washington University. Recent work has appeared in The Baltimore Review, Boulevard, The Cincinnati Review, Image, Kenyon Review Online, Prairie Schooner, River Styx, & Tampa Review.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 85 pages
  • Publisher: Mayapple Press (March 15, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936419378
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936419371
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,743,818 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Pat Noland on April 16, 2014
Without Angels does, indeed, deal with angels, but not with the kinds found in famous works of art or on greeting cards. Marjorie Stelmach’s angels come in many forms from stained glass creatures to a broken-winged figure trudging his way through Nevada.

In the foreword titled “The Angels and the Spadefoot Toads,” Stelmach sets forth the premise of the book. “What brought her, then, to the brink of angels was this: the thought of what a misstep among them might cost us.” These angels are quirky, as a list of “Traits of the Angels” reveals. When they touch, they “can feel the friction of a single photon anywhere in the universe.” Their speed is “wicked fast.” It is not easy being a Stelmach angel who will suffer with and because of humans. One angel, tortured to death, still works a major transformation in its torturer who laments, “Now, wherever I lie at night and / wake to screams and know they’re mine - that place is holy ground. / And I move on.”

Stelmach’s topics range from the story of Lot’s wife to the women at Jesus’ tomb. In “Triptych Without Angels,” she places two contrasting settings - a set of cement steps up from a river and a studio where the young Leonardo painted - to connect the topics of grief. and grace. “What I pray for is grace: the grace to know how long is grief, that we might know when it’s over.”

So much of the beauty of these poems lies in the voices of the narrators which have a gentle tone yet one insistent on finding meaning. The narrators question and seek - not always finding what they want, but always finding something. Angels do, after all, connect us to a higher realm.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on May 6, 2014
These aren’t Hallmark card angels floating around on cotton-candy clouds plucking their harps; these are angels here among us: our better angels, angels who play Chutes & Ladders, the angel in the interrogation cell, the angel at the border, the angel of torture. . . . Or they’re not here at all, they’re the absent angels, the ones in “Triptych without Angels,” or those in Section II, “Without Angels” which starts with the poem “An Alphabet of Diminishment.” Stelmach is a master of metaphor, the perfect image, les mots justes: “Sky the shade of a cotton ball soaked / in isopropyl alcohol.” “All morning a red-winged blackbird grates / on the world’s nerves.” “. . . sooty gargoyles / lolling above / in their bat suits. . . /. . . the lost ones / who huddle under bridges.” “Even so, / there’s October to weather . . . /. . . in the shops / children / are trying on bones.”

Stelmach’s language is remarkable, as is her ear, which is keenly attuned to sounds that bounce off and echo each other. More remarkable, still, is that there is not one ounce of sentimentality here:
“Tomorrow / is the only answer, every dying cell of it.” Stelmach is one of our best poets writing today; this is a collection not to be missed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lynette Ballard on April 17, 2014
Marjorie Stelmach's book provokes thought and emotion on the subject of angels. These are not greeting card angels or the ones in hokey religious art. Stelmach's angels live in this world and transport us beyond the merely material. I highly recommend this book to persons who value real poetry and are who are open to the movement of the spirit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Obviously I haven’t been paying enough attention because I’ve missed these bold, super-intelligent poems in places like Prairie Schooner and Kenyon On-line. Stelmach’s poems astonish with their wit and ingenuity.

Are you thinking you’re tired of angels? Think again. The diet, sexual proclivities, and criminal leanings of angels are wittily recounted in this book along with tales of a caged angel, the angel of induction who plays at Chutes & Ladders, the liminal angel, the angel of torture, and the angel of the border.

It’s a very smart, very surprising book. Each poem inhabits a distinctly different form. Often several strands of narrative and imagery are braided together in a single poem. For example, a reimagining of the legend of the Holy Rood is intertwined with an account of a walk among whispering salt-cedars in “Death Valley Meditations”: The cedars “preach of continuance— / endlessly, endlessly— / sermons for the fallen: How / to drink sorrow. / How to drink thirst.”

If you annotate as you read, you’ll find yourself writing “wonderful,” “amazing,” and (appropriately for this book) “Oh my God” next to phrases and lines such as “Ask again. Tomorrow / is the only answer, every dying cell of it,” “the crossfire clamor of slot machines,” “a suddenness of souls,” and “these fields of moving light thicken / into layers, comb / and comb themselves with calling. / / This will pass; it’s only longing.”

Here is “About God” in its entirety: “I worship the ground. / He walks on.”

The closer you look, the better these subtle, knowing poems prove to be.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Without Angels
This item: Without Angels
Price: $15.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com