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The Man Without a Country Paperback – June 1, 2011

21 customer reviews

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About the Author

Edward Everett Hale (1822–1909) was an American author, historian and Unitarian clergyman. He was a child prodigy who exhibited extraordinary literary skills and at age thirteen was enrolled at Harvard University where he graduated second in his class. Hale would go on to write for a variety of publications and periodicals throughout his lifetime.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 36 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463574576
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463574574
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,801,037 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By F. Hamilton on April 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
"The Man Without a Country," written by Edward Everett Hale in 1863, tells the story of Philip Nolan, a young lieutenant in the United States Navy, who, at his court martial for treason, damned the United States and cavalierly wished that he might never hear her name again. Nolan's sentence was to have his wish fulfilled. For fifty-five years he was kept at sea, being repeatedly transferred from ships that approached land to those that were headed out to sea. Although Nolan was not treated like a prisoner, a unique protocol was developed that kept him from hearing or seeing any news from home.
Because of obscure references (especially early in the story) and some archaic wording, reading the story aloud is recommended. This provides an excellent opportunity to demonstrate that much can be gleaned from a story even when references are not completely understood. Pausing periodically to summarize the main points can help to keep students involved until you get to Hale's anecdotes that will truly captivate them.
In addition to delineating the consequences of an impetuous act, "The Man Without a Country" provides a thought-provoking portrait of a patriot. In essays or debates students might consider Was Nolan's sentence fair? Should he have been pardoned?
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
I can't believe the reader from Allentown didn't care for this book. I first read this story in high school and remember how choked up I got over Phillip's absolute and total love for a country he hasn't been able to see or hear about for over half his life due to his impassioned, yet stupid youthful declaration that he "never wanted to hear his country's name again!".
I hope other would-be readers listen to the other reviews and try this book. You WILL NOT be disappointed. You will be fighting back tears by the end of this story. As I said, I read this book while in my teens and still enjoy re-reading it. You will cherish what you have after you finish.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 1998
Format: Hardcover
When Philip Nolan spewed out the words, "Damn the United States! May I never hear her name again!", the (c 1812) tribunal decided that that indeed would be his punishment for his involvement with Aaron Burr: Never to see or hear of his birth land again. The poignancy of this consequence through his long years of exile/imprisonment on U.S. ships crescendoes to the denoument, when the evidence of Nolan's encounter with what he had lost is described. Beautifully written. No flag-waving overt patriotism here. Subtle. Inferential. Puts one in touch with what we take so much for granted in the U.S. of A.!
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By The_Magician on November 21, 1998
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Philip Nolan, a man who is sentenced to remain at sea for his entirelife, with the punishment to never hear nor see of the United States again. Hale captures patriotism and heroic efforts in one man as Nolan bravely tries to hide the fact he still loves his country, but shall never see it again. It makes you proud to be an American and live under the glory that our forefathers fought for. So many times have I read this story, and each time I can barely get past parts that bring a tear to my eye. Ultimately a great and powerful book for any reader who enjoys a story of love, agony, and pride.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By JMack VINE VOICE on October 31, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I originally read this book in eighth grade, and recently had the desire to reread the book. The book was just as I remembered it. However, with a greater understanding of the world, I have learned to appreciate this classic even more. While an American may not agree with that the United States does, a perfect country or government has yet to be created. Philip Nolan made a statement in which he disowned his country in his younger days. It was a statement that he would quitely regret for the rest of his life. Even in exile, Nolan reflects loyalty to his country in his behavior. On his death bed, Nolan only wants to learn of what has happened to the country since he was exiled. He was able to die a happy man knowing how the country he loved had prospered.
The story is intended to made readers appreciate their country. Sometimes it may be difficult to agree with the government. In the end, one realizes that they love their country like a parent or their own child. Nolan had to learn this lesson the hard way.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By kat on January 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
When I was in 5 or 6 grade "The Man Without a Country" was required reading. It is one of the few books that were required reading that I never forgot. I am reading this book again for the first time since grade school. I feel that this book should once again become required reading for schools. We Americans all too often do not appreciate what we have.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald M. Bishop on January 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
Edward Everett Hale's "The Man Without a Country" is the fictional story of a young Army officer who before a military court in 1807 swears ""Damn the United States! I wish I may never hear of the United States again!" The court sentenced him to what he wished for.

(As the plot unfolds, some young readers -- future attorneys, perhaps -- focus on the irregularity and inhumanity of the sentence. Of course, there was no Philip Nolan, and the entire plot is fiction, a vehicle used by Hale to prompt reflection on the meaning of "country" in every person's life.)

This story was read by every American high school student from the time it was published in 1863 to the 1960s. The availability of many old editions from used booksellers gives testimony to its enduring power over the years. It surely helped form the patriotic sense of the World War II and Vietnam generations.

A few years ago, I was with a group of American missionaries in Bangladesh, and in a relaxed discussion about what we had read in high school, hardly anyone remembered "Thanatopsis" (by William Cullen Bryant), "Great Expectations" (Charles Dickens), " or "Evangeline" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) -- all staples of our generation's high school canon. But when I mentioned "The Man Without a Country," every one energetically nodded and said "Yes, that really made an impression!"

"The Man Without a Country" deserves a revival. It is "accessible," by which I mean that young minds can easily follow the plot and understand Hale's point. It can be related to lessons in American history -- Aaron Burr's treason and the "copperheads" of the Civil War, for instance. It conveys ideals from the young republic across the years to the present.
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