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Wizard Paperback – June 1, 2011


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About the Author

Sir Henry Rider Haggard, KBE (22 June 1856 – 14 May 1925) was an English writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa, and a founder of the Lost World literary genre. He was also involved in agricultural reform around the British Empire. His stories, situated at the lighter end of Victorian literature, continue to be popular and influential. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 34 pages
  • Publisher: Aegypan (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463800231
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463800239
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,492,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Gagewyn on February 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The plot to The Wizard concerns a clergy man, Owen. He hears a story of missionaries to an African tribe. After preaching the tribe reasoned that if servants of God in the bible could do miracles then those particular missionaries should be able to do miracles. They executed a criminal and asked the missionaries to revive the corpse. The missionaries couldn't and so one was executed for telling lies (either about God or about his relationship to God) and the other was sent back to seek a true follower of God.

So Owen sets off to Africa in the hope that God will work miracles and show the tribe the truth. Meanwhile the old king in Africa is getting old and there are many politics involving the following: the king's two sons, the wizards or traditional spiritual leaders and Noma, everyone wants her, she wants power, she is married to the head wizard. Owen shakes things up by continually being commanded to do certain miracles. As members of the tribe convert those in power become concerned about the effect Owen is having on their personal situations.

The writing and mix of action is typical for Haggard. It has the desirable powerful woman in the form of Noma. The exotic landscape and political intrigue worked well. I liked this book except for...

Since the plot concerns a missionary, there is a bit of religious reference here. It seems that Haggard was just a tad confused about church doctrine, which never helps. Owen struggles to deal with converts who already have multiple wives fitting into a monogamous religion. He comes to the "compromise" that if they are already married its OK, but after they convert they can't marry again if they are already married. News flash: that isn't a compromise. That allowance was made for converts to the early Christian church.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lori L. Grubbs on February 4, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While this book has adventure and the exotic mysteries of Africa, it also has a beautiful message that the reader can not walk away from and not be affected by. Much like Mr. Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe", "The Wizard" is a beautiful story of redemption, forgiveness, humility, and the greatest love of all. Mr. Haggard's finest work.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Review of H. Rider Haggard’s The Wizard- Kindle edition.
This is a novel presenting timeless themes of faith, redemption, civil conflict, and betrayal. Set in the lost world of central Africa in the 1890’s, we encounter the Children of Fire and their fatefull visit from “ Messenger”, a missionary named Thomas Owen. Tribal mysticism and culture clash with Victorian era values of Christianity , with some intrigue, adventure and epic battles thrown in for good measure. The story kept me interested. Give this one a try…Rating B-
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gagewyn on February 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The plot to The Wizard concerns a clergy man, Owen. He hears a story of missionaries to an African tribe. After preaching the tribe reasoned that if servants of God in the bible could do miracles then those particular missionaries should be able to do miracles. They executed a criminal and asked the missionaries to revive the corpse. The missionaries couldn't and so one was executed for telling lies (either about God or about his relationship to God) and the other was sent back to seek a true follower of God.

So Owen sets off to Africa in the hope that God will work miracles and show the tribe the truth. Meanwhile the old king in Africa is getting old and there are many politics involving the following: the king's two sons, the wizards or traditional spiritual leaders and Noma, everyone wants her, she wants power, she is married to the head wizard. Owen shakes things up by continually being commanded to do certain miracles. As members of the tribe convert those in power become concerned about the effect Owen is having on their personal situations.

The writing and mix of action is typical for Haggard. It has the desirable powerful woman in the form of Noma. The exotic landscape and political intrigue worked well. I liked this book except for...

Since the plot concerns a missionary, there is a bit of religious reference here. It seems that Haggard was just a tad confused about church doctrine, which never helps. Owen struggles to deal with converts who already have multiple wives fitting into a monogamous religion. He comes to the "compromise" that if they are already married its OK, but after they convert they can't marry again if they are already married. News flash: that isn't a compromise. That allowance was made for converts to the early Christian church.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By s.ferber on July 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
"The Wizard," H. Rider Haggard's 21st novel out of an eventual 58, was initially released as a serial in a publication called "The African Review" and then in its complete form in the October 29, 1896 "Arrowsmith's Christmas Annual for Boys." It was the third of four African novels that Haggard wrote from 1895-97, the others being "Black Heart and White Heart," "Swallow" and "Elissa," all of which I can highly recommend, by the way, especially "Swallow." "The Wizard" tells the story of Thomas Owen, a British missionary who ventures into the wilds of south central Africa to bring the Good Word to a tribe called the Amasuka, or the Children of Fire. A previous missionary had been killed by the tribe for his failure to work Christ-like miracles, but Owen, who Haggard eventually refers to as a saint, is undaunted. His advent at the tribe precipitates all manner of problems, including a poisoning attempt on its king, Umsuka; the seemingly inevitable conflict with head medicine man Hokosa; and a civil war between the princes Nodwengo and Hafela. I have yet to read a Haggard book (and I've read almost 40 at this point; the author can prove addictive!) that did not feature several action sequences, and "The Wizard" is no exception. Owen undergoes several trials by fire against the wizard guild--trials that resemble chicken runs with lightning--and the civil war that ultimately erupts in the land of the Amasuka features several exciting battle scenes and sieges. Haggard was a master at clearly describing these epic battle sequences to make them easily visualized by the reader, and his skill is in full flower here.

As in so many of Haggard's other novels, fantastical elements come into play.
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