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Wolfcry: The Kiesha'ra: Volume Four Hardcover – September 12, 2006


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 870L (What's this?)
  • Series: Kiesha'ra (Book 4)
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; 1st Printing edition (September 12, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385731957
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385731959
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,379,168 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up–After a war that raged for many years, Oliza Shardae Cobriana has become the heir to both the avian and serpiente thrones. As a symbol of peace at Wyvern's Court, she is expected to choose a mate who will become her king, but how can she choose between the serpiente, Urban, and the avian, Marus? When the princess is kidnapped and a note is found claiming she has abdicated the throne, mistrust erupts again between the races. Characters from Hawksong (2003), Snakecharm (2004), and Falcondance (2005, all Delacorte) are mentioned but no prior knowledge of the previous books is needed to understand the plot. A novel about the difficulty of bringing together two very diverse races and the sacrifices inherent in ruling, Wolfcry is a tale of the spirit and love that this ruling class has for its subjects.–June H. Keuhn, Corning East High School, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“A tale of the spirit and love that this ruling class has for its subjects.” –School Library Journal

“The most suspenseful book in The Kiesha’ra series. A fast-paced fantasy, full of adventure, mystery, and magic.”–VOYA“A compelling story.”–KLIATT


From the Trade Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Amelia Atwater-Rhodes wrote her first novel, In the Forests of the Night, when she was 13 years old. Other books in the Den of Shadows series are Demon in My View, Shattered Mirror, Midnight Predator, all ALA Quick Picks for Young Adults. She has also published the five-volume series The Kiesha'ra: Hawksong, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year and VOYA Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror List Selection; Snakecharm; Falcondance; Wolfcry; and Wyvernhail. Visit her online at www.ameliaatwaterrhodes.com.

Customer Reviews

This is the fourth book in a series.
Kimberly E. Phillips
I don't really feel much for her, but I don't dislike her either--that's the problem, you just don't know much about her.
Feelah the tigress
This book is a bit slow in some parts, but that didn't ruin the overall book.
BookLover

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Kaatz on January 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was just disappointed with the direction Atwater-Rhodes took with the story. The book had interesting and sad points, so it was fairly well written. But, not wanting to give it away, it depends solely on the person to know if you will like it or not. I still love Amelia Atwater-Rhodes as an author (having ownership of all her books). So, give it a read if you've read the other books in the series. Let me know what you think.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AL Abbott on July 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
A friend recommended me this series and I have to admit that I didn't think I would enjoy it. However, I'm glad she did recommend them because they're great books and this one especially. Oliza has to find a way to unite her families' courts and herself along the way. It's a great story of her journey.

Also, I don't feel the author is trying to 'push' anything upon her readers. She's writing a story and you don't have to enjoy the tale. I do enjoy it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jenine M. Cafarella on January 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Oliza is the child of two warring clans, the Serepentie and the Avians, and the hope for the end of segregation between the species. Despite the weight of the responsibility thrust upon her at such a young age Oliza loves the Wyverns Court created by her parents and is willing to sacrifice anything to bring the worlds together. But, years of hatred and distrust, despite 20 years of peace and the end of bloodshed, is not easy to let go of. Will Oliza be able to braid these two worlds into one society or is a future of disaster all she can look forward to?

Wolfcry is the fourth book of The Kiesha'ra books which begain with Hawksong, one of my favorite books ever. As the series has moved on the politics and mythology of Oliza's society has become more complex and a little harder to understand. Despite this I found Wolfcry to be an engrossing read with surprising twists throughout the story that I would have never expected when I picked the book up. Although I believe this book would totally lose anyone who is not familiar to the series as a whole it is definately a must read for those who have come this far in the Kiesha'ra world.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Lam on December 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I've followed Amelia since the start and own every novel except this one. And there is a reason for that. I think Amelia is a fantastic writer but I found Wolfcry to be sadly lacking.

**SPOILERS**

I found lots of incongruity with this novel. After viewing the future, Oliza was willing to go so far as to suffer poison, the clipping of her wings, and losing her winged forms--yet still it wasn't successful. I think if she was really dedicated she should have killed herself or something. I'm not even really sure what her plan for the lions was. There was no place they could've left her where she wouldn't be able to bargain and as we see, she was able to find her way back.

I was very disappointed that she abdicated the throne. It seemed her primary concern was that she couldn't chose a male mate that would satisfy both the avians and the serpents and that she couldn't produce any heirs. Who says she had to? It seemed that the avian and serpentiente cultures were pretty accepting of her lesbian relationship, was there no possible way they could accept a female ruling on her own. History has seen female rulers that could lead, for example, England's Queen Elizabeth. Under her, the country experienced the first peace in years and culture flourished--i.e. Shakespeare. Oliza could rule on her own and then later adopt someone as her heir. Speaking of-I felt it would be story logical for Sive and Salem to get together but Amelia probably felt that would be too reminescent of Danica and Zane.

Over time, I feel that the two cultures would further split apart, especially if there is no pressure for cultural exchange. The three avians that beat up Urban proves that even those who have never experienced war are quick to revert back to old prejudices.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on January 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
WOLFCRY, the fourth installment in Amelia Atwater-Rhodes's Kiesha'ra series, is an emotional, suspense-filled adventure. Oliza Shardae Cobriana, heir to Wyvern's Court, is considering male suitors from both the serpiente and avian races. She knows that choosing one will mean repercussions from the other, and maybe even war. On an evil night, one of her serpiente suitors is beaten so badly that he will never dance again, and as Oliza tries to help him while preventing a riot and a war, she is kidnapped. It doesn't help matters that at times she seems to slip into madness, having spells in which she is not aware of what's happening.

Oliza tries to remain clearheaded, but the pack of lions who hold her clip her wings, the worst fate possible for an avian, and drug her so she cannot change shape. They take her deep into the forest, and when she begins to think clearly again, she realizes that weeks have passed.

A wolf tries to help Oliza make her way in the woods, and she senses that it's a female who chooses not to change into human form out of fear. When she meets the local wolf tribe and its pack leader tries to assault her, Oliza knows why the female is afraid. After escaping, she collapses from hunger and illness; the wolf returns to Betia, its human form, to save her life.

The two survive together and encounter a tribe called the Obsidians, a rebel group. They're taken in and the bond between Betia and Oliza grows. They enjoy their time with the tribe, but eventually Oliza discovers that guards from Wyvern's Court are out looking for her. The two women return to find that tensions have heightened even more between the avians and the serpiente. Oliza's cobra father wants her to choose a mate, thinking that this will bring the people closer together.
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