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Wolverine and the X-Men: Alpha & Omega Hardcover – July 25, 2012


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Hardcover, July 25, 2012
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Product Details

  • Series: Wolverine
  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (July 25, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785164006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785164005
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 6.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #976,984 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Multiple Eisner Award-nominee Brian Wood released his first series, Channel Zero, to considerable critical acclaim in 1997 and has gone on to create hard-hitting original series such as DMZ, Northlanders, The Couriers, and The Massive. Adding to that body of work, he's also written some of the biggest titles in pop culture, with work on Star Wars, Conan The Barbarian, Lord Of The Rings and The X-Men.

Brian lives with his wife and two children in Brooklyn, NY.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. H. Wells VINE VOICE on July 11, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Collecting: Wolverine & the X-Men Alpha & Omega #1-5 (miniseries)

Bonus: Variant cover and Kid Omega bio

Alpha-dog and school headmaster Wolverine faces off against troublemaker and reluctant student Kid Omega (Quentin Quire). Quire hatches a maniacal practical joke that he plays on Wolverine and Armor. Using his telepathic powers, Quire creates a constructed world in his mind. He then hijacks Wolverine's and Armor's consciousnesses and places them in a world where Quire is God. As one might imagine, this is one prank that goes too far. Quire's construct becomes unstable, while Wolverine's body-- fueled by berzerker rage --hunts for his mind's kidnapper.

A number of things are going very well in this graphic novel. First Brian Woods' story deftly weaves between the school, dorms, and distopian fantasy. Quentin Quire is an awful student, but Woods story humanizes him. Quire is a dorky, angry, teenager with a loaded weapon. He reaches out and fails to connect to other students and teachers. Wolverine also must learn to deal with Quire in a manner befitting teacher/student instead of hero/villain.

I doubt there is a teacher out there who wouldn't be proud of how Wolverine turned this situation into a teachable moment.

The art in this graphic novel is also top-notch. Roland Boschi heads the art for real world and Mark Brooks draws the distopian constructed world. The art works phenomenally well. Boschi's ferral Wolverine is brilliantly gruesome. Brooks' rendition of the construct uses browns and grays to bring Quire's fascist fantasy to life. Boschi also pays extraordinary attention to detail: each student's dorm has posters and knickknacks that reflect each student's personality.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Simon on May 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This volume reprints a 'Wolverine and the X-Men' 5-issue spin-off series, though it could as easily have been published in the main title. This story focuses primarily on Wolverine, Armour and Quentin Quire (Omega), though Rachel Grey, Broo and Toad have page time. basically, Quentin doesn't want to go to his Psychwar 101 class, so he creates a mental construct based on a videogame, and traps Wolverine and Armor in it. While Wolverine's conscious mind is in the 'construct', his unconscious mind has his body on autopilot, and is looking for Quentin in the real world, with consequent structural damage to the school. Quentin, as expected from someone who buys his T-shirts from the Grant Morrison Slogan Shop, loses control and has to go in to try and rescue his prisoners. Will he succeed before Wolverine's body kills him? What do you think, reader? Well, how he succeeds is of course the point; that probably that last panel. I should note that fans of the series proper might award it more stars than me, but this could all have been done in one issue; but as we live in a capitalist society, as long as people keep buying the comics, they'll keep publishing as many as they can, and I'll keep reading the collected editions in my local library.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Noel TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
Spinning off of Jason Aaron's superb Wolverine and the X-Men, comes Brian Wood's Alpha & Omega which features punky mutant (punkant?) Quentin Quire aka Kid Omega, as he uses his psychic powers to ensnare Wolverine and Armor in a mental construct to prove his superior intelligence to everyone once again. The Construct is kind of like the Matrix where the bodies are motionless in one place and their minds are transported to another realm entirely.

This slim book has Wolverine and Armor, not knowing who or what they are, wandering around the Construct in a manga-esque city (I think I even saw Patlabor in one panel!) being chased by nameless baddies while Quire smugly tells himself he's a genius. Until things go wrong of course.

Brian Wood's a good writer but this isn't a very good book. It's story is very thin and really could've been told in one issue rather than five. It seems like once Wolverine and Armor show up in the Construct they just spin their wheels until they get out again, Quire gets egg on his face, and the book wraps.

Mark Brooks' artwork in the Construct is fantastic and contrasted hugely with the below-average artwork of Roland Boschi who drew the real world parts.

In terms of the Aaron books, I'd say this one fits in between Vol 1 and 2 of Wolverine and the X-Men though if you don't read this, you're not missing anything that will affect your enjoyment of the main title.

Wood has written some great books - his Northlanders series is fantastic - but this is a very weak and frequently boring addition to Jason Aaron's stellar Wolverine and the X-Men series. Overall, this is a very missable book even for fans of the main title.
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Format: Hardcover
Luckily as of this writing Amazon has this book for $10 because it sure isn't worth the $25 cover price. It reprints five issues so that's $5 an issue for a story that deserved three issues at most. The paper is incredibly thin. It's a joke when compared to the DC new 52 books which actually feel like books instead of a glorified magazine. Story & art were average.
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Format: Hardcover
I never liked Quentin Quire as a character. He's annoying, and has an ego way bigger than it should be.

After reading the book, I still don't like him, but I hate him a bit less. He enables an interesting story, and this resulting arc provides an interesting look into his character: he is not a psychopath, and is not actually evil--he's just the world's smartest idiot.

Essentially, the plot is Quire creating a fake reality in Wolverine/Armor's head, and messing with them to boost his own ego. But, Quire is a bit TOO good at creating fake realities...

If you don't like Quire, give this book a shot. You probably still won't like him, but it's an entertaining take on the character.
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