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Woman-Child (Kindle Single) [Kindle Edition]

Deborah Schoeneman
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $1.99
 
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Book Description

Meet the "woman-child" who acts, dresses and consumes pop culture like a girl. A counterpart to the "man-child" stars of Judd Apatow movies, these women would rather rally girlfriends to see The Hunger Games than the more peer-group-appropriate What to Expect When You're Expecting. They love the new television shows with "girl" in the title, and there are a lot of those these days. The extended adolescence means marriage and kids usually arrive after 35. Easily spotted sporting sparkly nail polish and friendship bracelets, their style gurus are celebrities who often dress younger than their years: Zooey Deschanel, Katy Perry and Nicki Minaj. Featuring interviews with Hellogiggles co-founder Sophia Rossi and New Girl creator Elizabeth Meriwether, journalist and television writer Deborah Schoeneman explores the latest trend and finds that women are increasingly looking back to create a new common ground.


Deborah Schoeneman is a writer for the HBO series Girls. Previously, she wrote for the CW's remake of 90210. Before becoming a TV writer, she was a journalist in New York for a decade, both as a contributing editor at New York magazine and a reporter for The New York Times' Sunday Styles section. Her novel, 4% Famous, was published by Random House in 2006. She lives in Los Angeles.


web site: deborahschoeneman.com

twitter: @debschoeneman


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

We've all heard of the "man-child"--those men who are adults according to their age but who act much younger, preferring video games and bros to careers and commitment. This phenomenon of aging backward isn't unique to men, as Deborah Schoeneman, a writer for HBO's series Girls, points out. She looks at the "woman-child" through the lens of society, the economy, and her own circle of friends to create a fascinating portrait of grown women who love Hello Kitty, browse the Young Adult section in bookstores, and maintain more close relationships with other women than with men. Schoeneman--who's married and recently had a baby--is an outsider struggling to understand where the "woman-child" comes from. Does it stem from the fact that this generation is marrying later? Is it a result of the struggling economy, which forces many a newly minted adult to move back home with her parents? Or is it the desire to follow the lead of celebrities who dress (or are cast in roles) far younger than their age? Schoeneman's quest for understanding is filled with humor and compassion as she weaves her own story of coming of age with interviews of the "women-children" around her. The end result is a fascinating and timely picture of both the positive and negative aspects of the trend, which serves as a perfect entry point into the discussion. --Malissa Kent

Product Details

  • File Size: 134 KB
  • Print Length: 35 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008XQ1TL2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #352,569 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
36 of 47 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Reductive and Worthless September 10, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
This essay is poorly thought out and doesn't say anything intelligent about the cultural phenomena that it pretends to analyze.

It seems as if you wouldn't qualify for Schoeneman's version of full womanhood without a husband and children-- what a revolutionary proposition! I assume this woman also asks her husband who to vote for in every election as well. Call me crazy, but there is more than one way to be a woman.

If you think the color of your nail polish and the kind of clothes you wear define who you are as a complete individual and adult, then sure, buy this single. But I can find plenty of more useful things to buy with my $1.99 that won't insult me.
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30 of 40 people found the following review helpful
By acf
Format:Kindle Edition
This single is just pointless. It's astounding to me that in 2012, women who claim to be feminists are writing pieces that attack other women.

This piece tears women down for prioritizing a career or (GASP!) friends over finding a husband, taking vacations instead of Lamaze classes, and watching What to Expect When You're Expecting over The Hunger games. Are you serious? Since when do nail stickers and taking vacations equal a lack of maturity? Who is ANYONE to define what a woman should be in 2012?

There are plenty of ways to analyze a cultural "phenomenon" without insulting every woman who chooses to be different than them. The author should work on that. And while she's at it, she should work on sounding less bitter.
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26 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wrong September 10, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
I can like what I like for as long as I like and do not have to 'conform' to what you think I should like. I am 37 and have two kids, work full time as a homemaker, home-school my kids, am married, like Hunger Games and Jose and the Pussycats and The New Girl, like sparkly and fun nail art, painted my nails in silver for over 10 years and have pink hair. I am offended by your term 'youthful enthusiasms'. I also watch the news, have complex thoughts and like deep thinking movies. Your premise is so wrong.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I want my money back October 7, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book is garbage. Don't waist your two dollars on this. It brings nothing new to the table, and who cares about why women are using nail polish stickers or bright and fun colors on their nails?!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bitter October 6, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This Kindle Single was incredible irritating. I had read the author's article on Jezebel and got the single to see if she was really that horrible. In short: yes. If you have read the Jezebel article in which she shames women for liking sparkles and nail polish, save your time and money and do not buy this single!
The most bothersome thing to me was that she does not make any REAL claims. I would have enjoyed the Single had she actually took some information, analyzed it, and told me "SO WHAT?" Instead, it just reads like a snarky woman snarking on other women's choices.
Particular things that bothered me... the section on the "woman-child" and dating, which implied that no man would want to date one, unless they are a pedophile, and that is bad! Women should want men to want them so they should not be women-children! She also implied that certain celebrity marriages failed because the females focused too much on the fantasy wedding and not on the marriage itself. That could be said about SO many failed marriages, why does she single out the woman-child?! She also condescendingly notes Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore's marriage, linking the "cougar" trend to the "woman-child" trend.
I also disliked her implications that, because she came of age in a certain time in which women tried to act more mature, that HER experience is correct and everyone else's MUST be wrong. Her condescending solipsism caused me to put down my Kindle more than once and walk away. For example, she talks about her mid-twenties, and follows it up with "Of course, we did it without bright nail polish or bows on our dresses." Like this makes her a superior person!
At this this article, briefly mentioned in the single, explicitly states WHY there is an issue with this sort of ultra-girly, childish behavior (that it makes it easier for men to downgrade us): [...]

Here is the article about this single that I would suggest you read instead of buying the single: [...]
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars who died and made you the judge? September 20, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This author has managed to insult women in general and me in particular!!She goes on and on blabbing about things that don't matter at all and never did! Saying that women are defined by their style or lack of it is denigrating!! I can do what I want and wear what I want and be who I choose to be!!!At the end of it all my life will be defined by who I have become and who is better off because I was!!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars to think about. April 16, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Are you for or against? Women should be girls forever? Or should they be WOMEN? To me, let's grow up.
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11 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Trite, Shallow, Belittling and Disappointing September 11, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I'm not even sure that I want to begin to discuss the way in which Schoeneman's assertions are damaging to women (though rest assured that they are, in spite of her sad attempts to pepper in feminist-ish sentences here and there hesitantly acknowledging that women feeling free to behave this way still represents a step forward for feminism).

I would be willing to read such a thing and discuss it criticially. The issue is that Schoeneman's piece is about as substantive as the airy confection-culture she's sort of kind of poking at throughout the piece. At times it reads like a self-aggrandizing story about Schoeneman's childhood. She is no doubt an intelligent woman, but her constant reminders about how "different" she is become almost desperate in the end. No! Really! I read good books, I tried hard, I did the right things! That's wonderful- I'm proud of it- but it implies that the inverse might be true of women who embody the "woman-child" persona.

It meanders, it traipses around, it becomes a cluttered mess of constant namedropping (I almost wanted to stop as soon as I saw the word "wunderkind" associated with Lena Dunham. PLEASE.), only once or twice does Schoeneman seem interested in talking to someone qualified to discuss the psychology behind this phenomenon, and in that instance the psychologist contradicts Schoeneman herself.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars ????
I finished this book and thought it was interesting makes you realize what is around us and how we woman do relate to the child inside
Published 20 months ago by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars 2.5 Stars: Would be an interesting blog post, or first draft.
Woman-Child is an interesting concept that shows the dangers of the Kindle Single program -- that often the pieces are not ready for prime time. Read more
Published on September 25, 2012 by Michelle R
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny and witty
I think that the negative reviewers on this page are taking their womanhood a little too seriously and Schoeneman a lot too literally. Read more
Published on September 20, 2012 by James Ramsey
5.0 out of 5 stars fun read!
a fun read on a trend that is popping up everywhere lately. interesting interviews with people from the pop culture world that are shaping this phenomenon.
Published on September 20, 2012 by Kristi Hughes
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful and fun
Thank you Ms. Schoeneman for your clever analysis! This was a fun read. As a mother and professional trying to maintain a sense of humor while attending to all my responsibilities,... Read more
Published on September 20, 2012 by GBF
5.0 out of 5 stars great read from a pop culture insider!
I really enjoyed this book! The author includes lots of interesting autobiographical anecdotes from her childhood and more recent observations as a professional tv comedy/drama... Read more
Published on September 19, 2012 by Dynamo_Patt
1.0 out of 5 stars Huh?
Fashions, diet, and social etiquette are always topics that deserve some in-depth feminist analysis, but it's not to be had here. Read more
Published on September 16, 2012 by Lee
1.0 out of 5 stars this is a joke, right?
I mean, this can't possibly be a real thing, can it? It reads like an essay written by the bitter adult version of the kid in your 6th grade class that didn't have a glitter pen... Read more
Published on September 11, 2012 by Rachel Riester
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More About the Author

Deborah Schoeneman is a writer for the HBO series Girls. Previously, she wrote for the CW's remake of 90210. Before becoming a TV writer, she was a journalist in New York for a decade, both as a contributing editor at New York magazine and a reporter for The New York Times' Sunday Styles section. Her novel, 4% Famous, was published by Random House in 2006. She lives in Los Angeles.

Web site: deborahschoeneman.com

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