Woman In the Fifth 2012 R

Amazon Instant Video

(33) IMDb 5.1/10
Available in HD
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THE WOMAN IN THE FIFTH follows American novelist Tom Ricks as he arrives in Paris determined to renew a relationship with his estranged wife and daughter. When the longed-for meeting goes poorly, he ends up in a seedy hostel on the outskirts of the city.

Starring:
Ethan Hawke, Kristin Scott Thomas
Runtime:
1 hour 25 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Woman In the Fifth

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Mystery
Director Pawel Pawlikowski
Starring Ethan Hawke, Kristin Scott Thomas
Supporting actors Joanna Kulig, Samir Guesmi, Delphine Chuillot, Julie Papillon, Geoffrey Carey, Mamadou Minte, Mohamed Aroussi, Jean-Louis Cassarino, Judith Burnett, Marcela Iacub, Wilfred Benaïche, Pierre Marcoux, Rosine Favey, Anne Benoît, Grégory Gadebois, Donel Jacksman, Laurent Lévy, Doug Rand
Studio ATO Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

I have not read the book, so I can't compare.
H. Schneider
Oh, yes, the film is artistic, beautifully photographed, and very French Noir.
Professor
We don't know how weird things really are until near the end of the tale.
The Movie Guy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mallorie Marshall on July 12, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Very disappointed by this movie. The book was great and so I anticipated the movie would be as well, especially after seeing who was going to star in the movie.

Very disappointed. Slow moving movie - lots missing...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Clyde P. Peters on September 24, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I was attracted to this movie by the stars. I have not read the book, but I view movies on the basis of a perceived entertainment value. Unfortunately, this one is not very entertaining, nor is it very believable, even as a so-called psychological drama. It's the first time I've ever been disappointed by Kristen Scott Thomas. Save your money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gerald Parker on April 1, 2014
Format: DVD
"Woman in the Fifth" (Mongrel DVD-4857 being the North American edition which I acquired) is a strange and unsettling film which opens question upon perplexing question in the viewer's mind and resolves nothing, even at the end. My "take" is that Margit, one of the novelist's two lovers, who, it turns out, had died a decade and an half before the time of the action portrayed even begins, somehow has drawn the protagonist into another realm of time and being, suspended between present and past. Having come to Paris to be near the daughter of his marriage with a wife now estranged, divorced, the writer, depending on one's perception, either sinks into a shadow life of mental illness or into the realm of the esoteric and occult, although he does not realise how fully until the film's dénouement of the various strands of his life and those of others among the cast. Ethan Hawke as the writer is bewildered, sad, and yet at times impetuously sexy despite the pervasive gloom of his moodiness, frustration, and torment.

Some find the motion picture chaotic and disorganised. I disagree about that. The film is wonderfully artistic, and, weird and it turns out more and more to be as its action proceeds, there is a clear line, one that is artistic and intuitive, from beginning to end, though not one that is susceptible to logical explanation and analysis. There are no extra features included, either, at least in the DVD as I found it, to help to shed some light on the film's tantalisingly unresolved mysteries or regarding what prompted the movie's creators to produce what they did. The film is just its own, by turns grungy, sensuously bittersweet, and rather nightmarishly peculiar self, a wondrously odd work of art. It is not, however, for those who regard as essential a tight movie plot and straightforward path to a clear conclusion!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Orson Welles on October 8, 2013
Format: DVD
I was quickly amazed by the excellence and originality of the cinematography and editing (starting with the shot of an airplane landing after the opening credits have ended. The film begins with soft focus shots of a forest, and similar shots recur later in the movie). I then was caught up in the director's extensive and original use of soft focus shots to advance intriguing, immediately mysterious plot. For example, when Ethan Hawke goes through customs, there is a shot of the customs officer in focus while Hawke, shot from behind, is out of focus. In the next, reverse shot, we still see the officer, no w in the foreground in focus, and when Hawke responds to his question, he stays out of focus; the camera does rack to bring him into focus when he talks, s Hollywood cinematographers conventionally do. Some shots are 90 precent soft focus (blurred). The plot itself--involving a domestic dispute over an American father's lack of visitation rights to see his six year old French daughter is is an effective device for launching the mystery--what did the father do to lose his wife and his child? Why does he have writer's block? Was he in prison, or only in a hospital? Was it a mental hospital? But the film gains its power from the way it is shot and edited. The acting, dialogue, and directing are first rate. In my view, the Woman in the Fifth is a vastly underrated film. I just want to testify as a cinephile fond of thrillers that Woman in the Fifth is a worthy successor to thrillers by Hitchcock, de Palma (Woman in the Fifth calls to my mind his films involving doubles), Pakula, and Polanski (Woman in the Fifth especially reminds me of The Tenant, and there are echoes of Polanski's less successful film, Frantic), among others. Woman in the Fifth really is worth watching. I will look for other films by this director.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Movie Guy on December 10, 2012
Format: DVD
Tom Ricks (Ethan Hawke) is an American novelist who goes to Paris in hopes of patching up his relationship with his ex-wife (Delphine Chuillot) and daughter (Julie Papillon). She wants nothing to do with him because of some event in their past, which is not fully explained. Through a series of bad luck he ends up working for a man named Sezer (Samir Guesmi) as a night time doorman, a job steeped with symbolism as he works on his second novel.

Meanwhile, Tom meets a mysterious older woman (Kristin Scott Thomas) who has taken a shine to him. She is the "Woman in the Fifth." He begins an affair with her about the same time he takes up with Sezer's girlfriend, his "Polish muse" (Joanna Kulig). We don't know how weird things really are until near the end of the tale.

If I told you I understood everything in this film, I would be lying. There is symbolism in his forest writing, the bugs, and the light which dims and goes bright, none of which I fully understood. Then there is the weird aspect of the movie which turns this into an existential film, something I didn't fully comprehend. I didn't think it was worth watching a second time through in an attempt to make heads or tails out of the film.

This is an artsy film. It is in part in English and French with subtitles, and Polish with no subtitles. The action moves slow as it concentrates on the character of Tom Ricks. I am looking for a good plot spoiler review to tell me what I just watched.

Parental Guide: F-bomb (in French, spelled correctly for us in English), sex, no nudity.
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