The Woman's Bible and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $10.83 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Used item in very good condition with clean, pristine pages.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Woman's Bible Paperback – June 8, 1993


See all 42 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, June 8, 1993
$19.12
$7.54 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

The Woman's Bible + Readings from the Ancient Near East: Primary Sources for Old Testament Study (Encountering Biblical Studies)
Price for both: $35.88

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Northeastern (June 8, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555531628
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555531621
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (355 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,292,751 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Every once in a while as we turn the pages of [this] impressive book, there is the temptation to sigh and shout an enthusiastic ‘Amen!’” —Oakland Press

About the Author

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born in Johnstown, New York, in 1815. She lived in Boston, Seneca Falls, and New York City, where she died in 1902. Maureen Fitzgerald is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Arizona.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It is my fault that I didn't take time to realize what I was getting.
Becky Shupe
I thought this was an actual Bible, but it seemed to mostly consist of theological views from a feminist perspective.
EclecticLife
The titled is very misleading and should not have the name Bible on it.
bobi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

251 of 277 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 30, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Famous suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) undertook to compile this work after the 1870 revision of the King James Bible was made by an all-male committee. She recruited commentators and essayists (identified by their initials at the end of the article) such as Matilda Joslyn Gage (author of Woman, Church and State), Ursula Gestefeld, Olympia Brown, Mrs. Robert Ingersoll, etc.

The book is divided into two sections: 'the Pentateuch,' and 'Judges, Kings, Prophets, and Apostles.' Stanton herself writes the Introduction to each section. She states in her Preface to the second section, "'The Woman's Bible' is intended for readers who do not care for, and would not be convinced by, a learned, technical work of so-called 'higher criticism.'"

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"I do not believe that any man ever saw or talked with God, I do not believe that God inspired the Mosaic code, or told the historians what they say he did about woman, for all the religions on the face of the earth degrade her, and so long as woman accepts the position that they assign her, her emancipation is impossible." (V1, pg. 12)
"Accepting the view that man was prior in the creation, some Scriptural writers say that as the woman was of the man, therefore, her position shold be one of subjection. Grant it, then as the historical fact is reversed in our day, and the man is now of the woman, shall his place be one of subjection?" (V1, pg. 20)
"Indeed the Pentateuch is a long painful record of war, corruption, rapine, and lust. Why Christians who wished to convert the heathen to our religion should send them these books, passes all understanding." (V1, pg.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
216 of 245 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
Stanton and her cohorts wrote The Women's Bible over 100 years ago and yet these commentaries are still as pertinent and valuable today as they were at the time they were written. She and others run rings around many of the tenets of organized religion, often disproving them with the very Scriptures on which they are founded! A great read for anyone who seeks equality for women in organized religion as well as those who wish to see a radical visionary (even by today's standards) at work in the 19th century!
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
139 of 156 people found the following review helpful By cathymarie on January 27, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is interesting and provides insight into the minds of women in our history. I thought everyone knew who Elizabeth Cady Stanton was -- it is amazing to read the work of someone so accomplished.

Obviously, it is not a "real" Bible or devotional. Anyone shocked by the content of this book probably does not have the capability of comprehending it, so if you mistakenly came across this book while searching for a devotional, don't download it. You will be disappointed. But anyone reading it from a historical and/or feminist standpoint will enjoy it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
70 of 77 people found the following review helpful By moo dog on June 11, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Despite my flippant title for this review, I have a great deal of respect for this book. It is not a devotional, nor a Bible, but rather more of an expose of how traditional patriarchal Christianity and Judaism used Scripture to oppress women (and other minorities), by deliberate mistranslations, omissions, and spinning the truth for their own gains.

Having been raised and educated in a ruthlessly patriarchal Christian denomination, learning as an adult that the Bible actually supports and venerates women almost brought me to tears. It was learning that I was Loved, not hated, by God. Only then could I learn the true meaning of "Love your neighbor as yourself." Up till then, my question about that passage was "but what if you hate yourself?" Everything I had learned about myself up to that point was that I was worthless, a sinner made all the more contemptible for having the X chromosome, rather than the Y.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was angry, make no mistake, and with good reason. Living a century before I had my epiphany, her life was even more proscibed than mine. She lived at a time when women lost both their first names and last names the day they were married, when a woman could not own property in her own name, when everything she posessed was at the whim of her husband, or nearest male relative. A friend once showed me a will written by his great grandfather, dated at the time of Stanton's life, and in it, he willed "To my wife, I leave her spinning wheel", thus assuring his wife she could continue to spin; had he not done that, her spinning wheel could have been seized or sold by the nearest male relative.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Lissagirl on February 20, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I have to laugh at all the people who got this book thinking that it was a Christian Bible for women and then gave it a bad review because it wasn't what they were expecting. Elizabeth Cady Stanton did a lot for women and we need to be thankful for her contribution to the rights we now enjoy. I think it is well worth a read or at least a skim. You need to read descriptions on items before you download them (for free, I might add.) Silly people! ;)
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?