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Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World Hardcover – August 26, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 131 pages
  • Publisher: Purdue University Press (August 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557535698
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557535696
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,709,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Susan's book gives a great perspective on how things have changed over time for women."Alice Krause of News on Women (newsonwomen.com)

About the Author

Susan Bulkeley Butler has been proving that women count ever since she became the first female professional at Arthur Andersen & Co. in 1965 and later the first female partner of what would become Accenture, the global management consulting company. Now, as a philanthropist, mentor, speaker, executive coach and CEO of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders (www.sbbinstitute.org), she is fulfilling her lifelong passion of making an impact on women and girls of all ages and helping ensure they too become women who count. Her first book, Become the CEO of You, Inc., was published in 2006.Bob Keefe has been a writer, editor and journalist for more than 20 years, most recently as the Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution newspaper. He and his wife currently live outside of Washington, where they're watching their three daughters grow into women who count.

More About the Author

Susan is CEO of The Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders and author of Women Count: A Guide to Changing the World.

In 1965, Butler was the first professional female employee at Arthur Andersen & Co., and in 1979 she became the first female partner of Andersen Consulting, now known as Accenture. Butler is currently on the Junior Achievement Worldwide Board of Directors, and the Board of Trustees of LeaderShape, Inc. Susan is a delegate at Vision 2020, a national project focused on advancing gender equality by energizing the dialogue about women and leadership. She is a past member of the Board of Trustees at Purdue University. As a philanthropist, Butler has endowed chairs, scholarships and the Butler Institute of Leadership Excellence. Late Indiana Governor Frank O'Bannon presented Butler the Sagamore of the Wabash Award, Indiana's highest honor for distinguished service. Additionally she received an honorary doctorate in management from Purdue. Her aspiration is to impact "zillions of women and girls to be all they can be." She fulfills this aspiration with her new book, WOMEN COUNT, A Guide to Changing the World, her first book, Become the CEO of You, Inc, (2008), her monthly newsletter, executive coaching, speaking and conducting workshops.

Susan holds a Bachelor of Science degree in industrial management and an Honorary Doctorate in management from Purdue University. She funded the Susan Bulkeley Butler Chair in Operations Management at Purdue's Krannert School and has also endowed scholarships and awards for outstanding students at Purdue and Simmons College.

Susan has received the Sagamore of the Wabash Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Governor of Indiana for distinguished service to the state. Prior recipients include presidents, ambassadors, artists and astronauts. In 2001, Upside magazine named her to its list of "The 50 Most Remarkable Women in Technology" who have moved the industry "beyond the glass-ceiling cliché."

Susan is Past President of Purdue's President's Council and serves on the Board of Directors of the Purdue Research Foundation, the Dean's Advisory Council at Purdue's Krannert School of Management, and the National Board of Advisors of the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. Susan has been a member of the National Board of Directors of the Girl Scouts of the USA and in 2003 was appointed to the worldwide board of Junior Achievement. She is a member of the Committee of 200 and has participated in Fortune's "Most Powerful Women in Business" Summits.

Customer Reviews

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By SGillen on September 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"Woman Count" has widened my view of my own future at the age of 40, as well as how I see the future for my children. I have given this book as gifts to friends young and old - and it has prompted great discussion.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. Storey on October 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I have to say that I loved this book! While a compact book, there is so much information contained in these pages that made me realize how fortunate I am for women in history that have shaped the world as I know it today. This book also made me take a look at my own life and wondering how I am contributing to the world for future generations. What could I do in my life that might make a change that in 20+ years will be noted by others?

I enjoyed reading little bits about various historical women that paved the way for me and more than just those in the Women's Suffrage movement. Did you know the cotton gin idea was created by a woman, Catherine Littlefield Greene? Knowing that she would never receive a patent for it that she shared that information with Eli Whitney who did patent the machine. This is just one example that Susan notes in her book.

I'd say that this book could be read by anyone of any age. There are some parts that might impact a woman that is older (18+) but there are many parts that younger women could take and work into their lives.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Barrett S. Avigdor on September 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Many people - mistakenly or optimistically - think we are in a post-feminist world. They argue that the feminist movement of the 1960s and 70s made its impact and there is nothing more to do for women. That is no more true than to say that Barack Obama's election marks the end of racism in the US. We have made great progress but we are not yet an equal society. Susan B. Butler reminds us how far women have come in seeking equality and how far we have yet to go. She tells us inspirational stories of women who were pioneers in their field, including Ms. Butler herself who was the first female professional at Arthur Andersen & Co. More than that, she challenges us to dream big and to go beyond what others before us have done. Women comprise over half the population of the US and more than 60% of our college graduates. If companies exclude women from leadership or if women "opt out" of the work world because they cannot find a job that allows them to fulfill their commitments to their families in the way that they need to, we have lost a tremendous amount of talent. This book is a call to action for CEOs who, consciously or unconsciously, have created corporate cultures in which women do not thrive. It is also a call to action for women of all ages who may have focused too much on the obstacles and not enough on their dreams. Ms. Butler speaks with authority as a woman with decades of executive experience, including years as the Chief of Staff of the CEO of Accenture, a $21 billion technology and outsourcing consulting company with over 200,000 employees.

Feminism isn't dead because its work is not yet done. Susan Butler is the new voice of feminism in the 21st century and she is a voice worth listening to.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Loderick TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The title implies this is a guide to changing the world. It's not. It is a history of women leaders and women's accomplishments. We can certainly learn from the past but it would also be very helpful to have tactical advice on how we can become leaders.

What I enjoyed about this book:

**women's perspective on history. Like most, I wasn't aware of the many women that Susan highlights. Elizabeth Blackwell, one of the first women doctors and Myra Bradwell, the first female attorney, are two examples.

Where the book missed its mark:

**too many lists of strong women and not enough analysis of what made them strong.

**not enough practical advice on how a woman can achieve her full potential.

**not enough discussion of whether women should lead like men or be more true to themselves and lead with consensus. Let's face it, women are different from men. This isn't good and it isn't bad; it just is. Again, it would have been more helpful if Susan had presented the pros and cons of both approaches.

**too much mention of Susan's accomplishments at Accenture and not enough discussion of HOW she achieved what she did.

Given the title implies a guide to change and this book wasn't that, I'm only rating it 2 stars. From a historical perspective, the book is helpful.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
It happens to a lot of authors: they have a great story to tell, so they write a self-help, "how to" or guide. This book, sent to me as a review copy, offers a good example.

Author Butler probably has many stories to share. I'd like to learn from her experience. How did she manage to get a job in a male-dominated accounting firm and hang on? What are some challenges she experiences as an executive coach and consultant?

Instead this book seems based on the premise that women have made some progress; now it's time to "make everyone count."

First, not everyone - male or female - wants to pay the price of "counting." Second, it's not clear what we need to do if we want to count.

Butler provides a lot of historical background. Each example is brief and anyone familiar with the women's movement will not find new ideas here. Even worse, some examples seem to suggest problems without solutions. For instance, Butler describes a female tennis star whose career was sidelined by giving birth. Why not look to the WNBA? Yolanda Griffith lost her spot at a prestigious college program when she had a baby in college, but she became a professional, an Olympian and a legend. Many WNBA players are mothers, as is legendary female coach Pat Summitt.

Butler tries to provide some tips in the last chapter but they're extremely vague: "Be a good listener" is just one tip for a mentor.

I just finished reading another book about women that probed women's roles with far more insight: Damned If She Does, Damned If She Doesn't, by Lynn Cronin and Howard Fine. Ironically that book made me question Butler's book: realistically, what can we do? We need answers that come from outside the box and the book.
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