Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution 59921st Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0801494819
ISBN-10: 0801494818
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$1.92 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$18.44 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
14 New from $13.45 37 Used from $0.99 1 Collectible from $12.50
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks
$18.44 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution
  • +
  • Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives
  • +
  • Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe (New Approaches to European History)
Total price: $76.79
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Landes explores from the critical perspective of feminist political theory the historical evolution of 'the public sphere'―its definition as male space and the exclusion of women from it."―Women's Review of Books

"Filled with stunning hypotheses and brilliant insights."―Choice

"In this intelligent and readable book, Joan Landes argues that women's exclusion from the modern public sphere is neither accidental nor incidental but a central feature of its incarnation."―Journal of Modern History

"It is in reading Joan Landes's Women and the Public Sphere that we can best see the power and problematic character of democratic thinking as Tocqueville understood it . . . .Both female domesticity and modern feminism, as well as the difficulties that attend each, originated in liberal republicanism."―The Review of Politics

"Should become part of the increasingly varied repertoire available to everyone interested in the formation of the discourse of modern politics as well as specifically feminist issues."―Eighteenth-Century Studies

"Joan B. Landes's theoretical analysis of the public sphere organizes a wide spectrum of events and texts in order to examine, from a feminist viewpoint, the passage from absolutism to bourgeois society during the period between 1750 and 1850. Responding especially to the work of Habermas, Landes investigates the way in which the emerging bourgeois public sphere was constituted to exclude women."―The French Review

"Compelling and thought-provoking. . . . Ranging across several disciplines and the critical historical divide of the French Revolution, it gives us women's voices, classical political thory, and an analysis of political culture all at the same time. Landes has opened an exciting path in the study of gender and politics."―Lynn Hunt, University of Pennsylvania

About the Author

Joan B. Landes is Professor of Women's Studies and History at Penn State University. She has published articles on a wide range of topics in the social science field, from critiques of Hegel and Habermas to representations of the body, and has worked in depth on many aspects of the French
Revolution.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 59921st edition (August 4, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801494818
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801494819
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,031,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is an outstanding scholarly work by a well-respected scholar of Old Regime France and the role of women in history. To criticize her work because her definition is loosely based on a term which refers to an often nebulous group or phenomenon that is historically impossible to nail down is cheap. As to any criticism of her methodological sloppiness (here in using modern films to exemplify points she makes in her book and draw the reader into the story in an engaging fashion or to show the longevity of historical memory), you ought first to be clear in your examples and then to justify your criticisms for the reader. Your "critical" review is much sloppier and gives little information besides your negative opinion.

One of the purpose of this book is to explore the power of rhetoric and the (lack of) influence women were able to exert in pre-Revolutionary and Revolutionary France. Landes has been criticized for a weak sense of coherency in the way she deals with her text and a lack of hard evidence to back up her claim that the dominant ideology of "equality, liberty and fraternity" developed and instituted by the "bourgeois" Republic necessarily limited women. Her evidence is in the weight of rhetoric to influence politics, an important debate in French Revolution historiography, from scholars like Furet and Chartier to historians like Joan Landes. Her methodology is not exactly sloppy and there is little evidence to suggest that she doesn't understand the methodological models she uses. The confusion here must come from that fact that she is combining Habermas' sociological theory with a postmodernist emphasis on the importance of an even more abstract and difficult to document force, the power of language.
Read more ›
Comment 7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am only including a review because it is clear that this book deserves more than 2 or 3 stars. It is a scholarly work which has been respected and documented in many other historical works in this field, and if it's good enough for professors of history it is sure as hell good enough for the plebeian readers of Amazon.com.
Comment 2 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Joan Landes' "Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution" consists of several essays loosely united by the theme of women and their place in the "public sphere" of activity during the late 18th century-- and specifically during the French Revolution. This is an important and exciting topic-- and it's one that has not yet been researched to exhaustion.
Sadly, Landes' book is flawed in several ways. Some of these flaws are forgiveable, but a few are fatal. One of the most obvious faults of this book has to do with one of its central concept-- the idea of the "public sphere". Landes specifically states that she is using this term as the philospher Habermas used it in his famous "Public Transformations of the Public Sphere". However, that is not what she does. Habermas's conception of the public sphere is that the idea of the "public" emerged as a term for referring to the collective sets of feelings arising from private individuals engaged in private activities-- and *NOT* as something that exists in opposition to private interests and activities (which is how Landes uses it). Now, the truth be told-- I don't think it's really a *problem* that Landes uses a different model of the public sphere than Habermas... after all, there's no reason to say that Habermas definition of it is any better than hers. However, the fact of the matter is that Landes claims she really IS using Habermas' model of the public sphere. In other words, it's not that she prefers another model-- it's that she misunderstands the model she's trying to use!
While this fact does not necessarily invalidate the whole book, it is, nontheless, a bit troubling.
Read more ›
1 Comment 14 of 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution
This item: Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution
Price: $18.44
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: la transparence et l'obstacle