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Women, Race, & Class Paperback – February 12, 1983


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Women, Race, & Class + Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches (Crossing Press Feminist Series)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (February 12, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394713516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394713519
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Longtime activist, author and political figure Angela Davis brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership. Davis' message is clear: If we ever want equality, we're gonna have to fight for it together.

Review

"As useful an exposition of the current dilemmas of the women's movement as one could hope for."--Los Angeles Times Book Review

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Customer Reviews

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See all 27 customer reviews
I recomend highly!
Svetlana Fridlyand
This book had the most incredible and insightful research.
The Prissy Snob
I think I can relate to her ideas in a lot of ways.
freyourself

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By F. Mercer on December 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book, or at least excerpts from it, should be a must read for everyone. Davis presents a side of the suffragette movement, the first wave of feminism, that many people will never be aware of--the conflict between women's rights and African American rights, and the underlying racism of the movement spearheaded by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Davis then effectively juxtaposes the first wave of feminism with the second wave of feminism in the 1960-70's to show the correlation between the two movements.
In both cases, the fight for African American rights took prescedence over the rights of women. While during the first wave of feminism, black women were ignored by the suffragettes, during the second wave of feminism, black women were faced with the choice of going forward in a women's movement that, once again, didn't really include them, or supporting the rights of African Americans as a race. A difficult choice. Davis clearly elucidates the failings of the both waves of feminism to include ALL women and shows how necessary it is for women, regardless of race, to work together.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 16, 1997
Format: Paperback
Professor Davis provides a history of the Black, Women's and workers' movements in the US and documents the many points of common contact. She painstakingly supplies an abundance of historical evidence that demonstrates the fact that women, working people or people of color can only succeed in the attainment of their own liberation by working in conjuction with the efforts of the others. She also reminds us that the majority of women are workers and that the majority of people of color are workers, and points out that the outcome of the struggle these groups face will impact directly upon the future condition of all working people
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you are interested in an indepth analysis of the history of many of our current social movements this is the book for you. Angela Davis is brillient to be sure, but this book portrays her intelligence in understanding (and ability to convey) the conplex issues America must disern concerning gender, class and race. She also is able to articulate beautifully how these three issues intertwine. The book is worth the read for personal as well as acedemic growth.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Angry buyer on December 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book years ago. But, it remains a valuable rsource book. Recommend it for anyone writing on woman's issues.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sonya Lavette Bell on December 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Angela Davis is a name as synonymous with Black Power as The Black Panthers. Her words inspire, teach and REACH the minds of all who read them.

This is a must read and makes a great gift for young Black men and women.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By freyourself on March 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read half of the book, and find Sister Davis enlightening! I think I can relate to her ideas in a lot of ways. She has also helped remind me that I need to help uplift others. :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angel on February 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is amazing for anyone interested in philosophy, African American studies, and/or feminism. Angela Davis is a great writer and great mind.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Prissy Snob on February 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book had the most incredible and insightful research. The detailed information on the plight of the enslaved woman was amazing. Another favorite chapter of mine was, Racism, Birth Control, and Reproductive Rights. The previously mentioned chapter sheds light on widespread practice of surgical sterilization. Ms. Davis especially makes a point of how this practice was forced upon the poor. It was also refreshing to read about women who were influential in the Communist and Worker's Rights movements. There was also eye-opening accounts of how racism was rampant in the suffrage movement. This book was straightforward nothing but the facts. I would have liked Ms. Davis to convey more of her thoughts and feelings. You can gather her perspective to a degree but you do not close the book feeling like any certain view was being forced upon you.
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