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475 of 487 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Inner Wellspring
Reading the other customer reviews, I find it very interesting to see how different they are, and how different many of them are from my experience.
I was surprised to read the review on this page by the woman who believes we ought to read Jung first (or instead). My experience is the opposite; when I've picked up Jung's original works I've found them tough to...
Published on February 8, 2000 by Sarah A. Rolph

versus
79 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wisdom and Native Lore: Women's Traditional Stories Retold
Ancient cultures the world over have all had oral traditions as the roots of their literature, both for the purposes of education and entertainment.
In the darkness by the fireside, story-tellers enthralled their fellow tribesmen with tales handed down through countless generations and centuries.
What determines which stories are told and re-told on through...
Published on June 1, 2000 by Lynn Bulmahn


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475 of 487 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Inner Wellspring, February 8, 2000
By 
Sarah A. Rolph (Carlisle, MA USA) - See all my reviews
Reading the other customer reviews, I find it very interesting to see how different they are, and how different many of them are from my experience.
I was surprised to read the review on this page by the woman who believes we ought to read Jung first (or instead). My experience is the opposite; when I've picked up Jung's original works I've found them tough to follow, but this book I found very accessible and useful. I don't think the comparison between the Bible and a tv evangelist is at all fair. It's more like the difference between Strunk & White and the Oxford English Dictionary. The OED is wonderful, but Strunk & White is the one that is most likely to help you become a better writer.
Although I think of myself as a creative person, I tend to downplay that part of myself and to lead with my left brain, as it were. Reading this book I felt like I was being given a path to my inner wellspring. I felt that I had at last found water for a thirst I hadn't quite been able to identify until now.
This book is about one's inner life. It is not a how-to book, it's not political (except in the sense that the personal is political), and I didn't feel that it over-emphasized "what's wrong with you," as another reader put it. It does continually nudge one to think about what might be wrong: many many women are cut off from their own preferences, their own inner selves, because they feel pressured to conform with societal norms. Many societal norms are, in my opinion, quite damaging and inappropriate. It is very easy in American society to get the impression that women should be seen and not heard. Women are still encouraged to focus on how we look, to be compliant, to act ladylike and be nice even when we are being denigrated, and to stand by our man no matter what. We are encouraged to help others at the expense of our own happiness, and many many of us fall into this trap without even realizing it. We think it is normal to put ourselves last, and we lose touch with the shames and the fears that keep us from being happy, wiping the subject of happiness off the table with a dismissive hand as something that is too indulgent or not important.
This book helped me realize the ways in which I stand in my own way, and it gave me courage and inspiration.
The author is not only a Jungian analyst, but a storyteller. She is steeped in the traditions of storytelling from both the Latin and the Hungarian sides of her family, and I very much enjoyed the ways in which she uses this legacy of the storyteller as healer to make her points. I never thought of storytelling in this way before, but reading this book I found it to be true. (I feel that her stories have helped heal me.) I am a storyteller myself, of a sort, so for me the book was a kind of homecoming. If you have ever wondered why fairy tales seem so cruel and peculiar, you will find the answers in this book. Fairy tales have been mangled in the translation, but this author shows you where they came from and what they are really about.
While I am a huge believer in free-market capitalism, growth, business, and civilization (as opposed to back-to-nature Green-ery), I have tremendous concerns about the increasingly violent and impersonal nature of our society. This book shows you how to cultivate a healing, loving attitude toward the world without becoming a doormat--quite the contrary, it shows how love can give you more strength and power than you'll ever find in a boardroom.
Another review on this page criticized the book for not putting these issues into a broader context of one's life. It took twenty years for this author to distill her wisdom of storytelling and her knowledge of Jungian archetypes into this lovely, readable book. For me, that's quite an accomplishment. I'm more than willing to take it the rest of the way myself.
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110 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 15th Read in 2006, January 11, 2006
By 
Since this book was first published in 1992, I have made it my New Year's resolution to re-read Women Who Run with the Wolves every year. I have given more copies of this book away than I can remember - and I am thrilled to do so. I begin again in 2006 for the 15th full reading (though I pick a page throughout the year to journal with and 'wake me up'.)

To begin the wondrous journey of discovery to my wild and intutive self is a gift and a new journey to uncovering the jewel within. New depths of power are accessed with every reading and I am bathed in feminine myth and mystery. This book has inspired me to design, write, accomplish and accept fulfillment at so many levels. Please read this book. Women Who Run with the Wolves is a MUST tool for every female. It's a treasure. Elaine Maginn Sonne, PhD, Author Legends of the Stones.
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79 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wisdom and Native Lore: Women's Traditional Stories Retold, June 1, 2000
Ancient cultures the world over have all had oral traditions as the roots of their literature, both for the purposes of education and entertainment.
In the darkness by the fireside, story-tellers enthralled their fellow tribesmen with tales handed down through countless generations and centuries.
What determines which stories are told and re-told on through the ages? Usually, they are tales which illustrate a moral value, a particular quality or a lesson that a particular society deems important. Whether it be a cautionary tale or a legend demonstrating a virtue, we get great insights into what is valued by examining the old, old stories.
Until recent years with the advent of Women's Studies on university campuses, the teachings imparted to one's daughters and grandaughters were often overlooked. That glaring omission has been rectified through Clarissa Pinkola Estes' incredible book.
"Women Who Run With the Wolves" is not light reading by any means, but is a scholarly exploration of the feminine character. Has civilization tried to strangle our basic "Wild Woman" inner natures? And, if so, at what cost has the shrew been tamed?
"Women Who Run With the Wolves" contains some familiar stories from our collective childhoods: The Little Match Girl and Bluebeard. But these are not the soothing, toned-down versions to read by your toddlers' bedsides. Instead, they are terrifying and real.
Estes, who is both a Jungian analyst/psychologist and professional storyteller, vividly recounts the visceral details of often violent folklore.
Not only are European nursery tales included, but the book is global in scope. Estes also weaves in less familiar traditions, such as stories from the Lakota Indians. The one element running through all the stories is how they relate to women's lives and spirits.
In each section, the author gives a scholarly overview of why the tale was told, what values it imparted, and why the story still speaks to us today. She also recounts the story with great dramatic narrative, and it is easy to imagine oneself listening to the tale around a flickering campfire late at night.
Ancient wisdom coupled with modern psychological insights make reading this book a mind-expanding experience.
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54 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant woman writes about the exceptional in women, September 13, 2005
By 
Greg Noble (Glendale, California, USA) - See all my reviews
This book is so different, so astounding, that it defies catagorization. The concept of analyzing ancient legends and folk tales to reveal the inner nature of women and the patterns in womens' lives felt revolutionary to me when I first sat down with this book. But then, as I read each segment and digested the author's analysis and correlation with typical life patterns experienced by women, I realized that she tapped into truths which are as ancient as the folk tales and legends themselves. Besides that, she is one of the most ELOQUENT writers I've ever had the pleasure to read. Her observations and their resulting lessons are so profound, so insightful they take my breath away at times. I just have to sit back, take a deep breath, shake my head and reread the section that just overwhelmed me.

My favorites are "Skeleton Woman" and "Baubo the Belly Goddess". I don't want to give away any surprises... so just get this wonderful book and read these chapters for yourself! I've read it straight through, and then gone back to re-experience my favorite chapters. This book can be enjoyed either way! I would so love to meet this woman at a booksigning.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read IT, LOVED IT 12 years ago and still do, August 29, 2006
By 
When I see young women who don't trust their gut feelings, who don't envision their full potential, who allow abuse, who lack self-confidence, I WISH THEY WOULD READ "Women Who Run With Wolves." This is not an "easy read," but DO READ IT and become a powerful woman on the inside -- a woman whose soul is steady and strong -- a "Wild Woman." The author of this book taught me the wisdom and lessons of ancient "fairy tales." This author taught me to strengthen my core, my soul, trust my own wisdom, listen to myself and stand tall and firm and strong.

This book helped me get over mistakes of the past, and prevent many future mistakes. Re-reading it always gives me strength and courage and builds my self-confidence.

Also, today, as an "Old Woman" I cannot stand by and quietly watch young women lose their souls. I must "teach" in a quiet, kind, gentle way. And, recommend this book !! I hope you love it, as I did and do.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars NOT unabridged, April 21, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I am reading Ms. Estes' book by the same name and am really enjoying it...so much so that I got a copy for my daughter before I even finished the book myself. My other daughter preferred a CD of the book and when I found this "unabridged" version, I bought it for her. I was very surprised when she finished it in a little over 2 hours and many of the most compelling stories had been omitted. If everything in the book is not on the audio version, it has definitely been abridged. Amazon needs to change their description so the buyer knows what they are buying.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Energize Your World, December 10, 1999
By 
Kristin Dunn (So. Calif. USA) - See all my reviews
A sweet reminder for women to pull back, reflect and re-energize. Dr. Estes informs women to be creative and links individual creativity to soul essence. Dr. Estes maintains a women's knowing is in her bones, at the cellular level and gives interesting representation through ancient story telling. An enriching narrative to help women get in touch with their instincts especially for those that have been to hell and back. She gives us food for thought as to the topworld and underworld, the conscious and unconscious and how to bridge these worlds to maintain a healthy, happy and CREATIVE life. A must read for anyone wanting to gain further access to spirituality.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fab-u-lus!, August 15, 2005
By 
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Soothing voice, charming stories, thoughtful and intelligent interpretations, relevant and useful to daily life. Ms. Estes is my new good friend. I have purchased more of her audio books after being so delighted with this one. Thanks Clarissa!
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is for anyone who is sick of being tame!, March 25, 2001
This is one of my all time favorite books. I have underlined parts that made me say "A-ha!" out loud and the parts that made me question...parts that helped me work through things. There are also numerous notes in the margins. To say it's dog-eared would be an understatement...
If you love myths and folklore this book is for you.
If you feel lost this book is for you. If you are suffering from the too-nice syndrome this book is for you.
This book will challenge you to let out the fierce creature that is inside. Do you dare?
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A life-changing, warmly written book., September 13, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype (Hardcover)
I found this to be an intelligent, accessible book geared toward women. The author uses age-old stories to help the reader understand her life, her heart and her soul better. It is in no way a book against men. It does not encourage irresponsibility or the development of a feral personality. It does encourage women to look inside themselves, to bring out the creativity and emotion within. The book does encourage women to respect and take care of themselves. It is a book, to be slowly read, about healing the soul.
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Women Who Run with the Wolves:  Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype
Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype by Clarissa Pinkola Estes (Hardcover - May 1, 1992)
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