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Women, Work, and Autoimmune Disease: Keep Working, Girlfriend! Paperback – May 1, 2008


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Women, Work, and Autoimmune Disease: Keep Working, Girlfriend! + Living Well with Autoimmune Disease: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know + The Autoimmune Epidemic
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Demos Health; 1 edition (May 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932603689
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932603682
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,059,911 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An essential resource and guide for women living with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and multiple sclerosis... The final chapter 'Developing Your Warrior Spirit: Hope and Resilience,' is a beautiful summation of the tone of the book. The authors include an excellent list of additional reading materials."--InFocus (Autoimmune Diseases Association)

"...clear, down to earth and extraordinarily helpful."--Diabetesmine.com

"Any woman with a chronic illness needs to read and can substantially benefit from Women, Work, and Autoimmune Disease" -- Midwest Book Review

"MS expert and CrohnÇ Ùs disease sufferer present a book of inspiration and wisdom for women that live and work with chronic disease... discusses hope and resilience." --ForeWord Magazine

"The authors use first-person accounts to illustrate their advice on coping simultaneously with symptoms and thechallenges of the workplace; developing a financial plan; communicating withcoworkers, employers, and loved ones; building a support team; and balancingwork and family responsibilities. A little book with lots of useful advice;recommended."--Library Journal

"An essential resource and guide for women living with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and multiple sclerosis... The final chapter 'Developing Your Warrior Spirit: Hope and Resilience,' is a beautiful summation of the tone of the book. The authors include an excellent list of additional reading materials."--InFocus (Autoimmune Diseases Association)

"...clear, down to earth and extraordinarily helpful."--Diabetesmine.com

"For the chronically ill, the decision to continue working or not, can be anagonizing one. Optimistic, but realistic, Women, Work, and Autoimmune disease helps the reader carefully weigh the pros and cons ofworking so that they can make an informed and rational choice. Specificsteps are offered to help you make accommodations that may allow you to stay in the workforce longer than you thought possible."--Allison Shadday, author of MS and Your Feelings: Handling the Ups and Downs of Multiple Sclerosis

"Despite the relative slimness of Joffe and Friedlander's book, it is packed with useful information that can help women navigate the world of work...Writing about the unpredictability of AD, the stages of chronic illness and career development, they connect their experiences and those of other women in a way that I found reassuring and empowering. Whether you are happily employed, considering quitting your job, or drawing up plans to start your own business, Women, Work and Autoimmune Disease will prove a helpful guide for thinking through the options." -- Donna Rafanello, Assistant Professor of Child Development, Long Beach College, Long Beach, CA, Momentum Magazine Fall 2009 (Donna Rafanello Assistant Professor of Child Development, Long Beach College, Long Beach, CA, Momentum Magazine Fall 2009 2010-05-03)

About the Author

Building on her experience living with chronic illnesses, including MS and ulcerative colitis, Rosalind Joffe founded the executive career coaching practice, cicoach.com, dedicated to help others with chronic illness develop the competencies they need to succeed. She is a recognized national expert on chronic illness in the workplace. As a leading executive career coach, she has been quoted in The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, ABC Radio, as well as a variety of regional and national media outlets. Rosalind has published in dozens of disease organization and health journals. She is a sought-after speaker and workshop leader for organizations that include the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, BiogenIdec, State Street Global, New Directions, Association of Career Professionals, HealthTalk.com, New England Arthritis Foundation, and the Scleroderma Association.

Joan Friedlander founded Lifework Business Partners, a national coaching andtraining company, in 2000. Joan works with entrepreneurs in service businesses to develop strategies to move to the next phase of growth inbusiness without losing sight of their personal needs. She was diagnosed with Crohn's disease in 1992, and with the exception of several short-term disability leaves, has successfully managed her career. In addition tocoaching, Joan is a veteran facilitator of the Get Clients Now! marketing program, a paid speaker, and the author of two workbooks, The MasterCalendar Solution and An Introductory Guide to Delegation. Joan has been quoted in Chronically Happy by Lori Hartwell and contributed to the second edition of Get Clients Now!by C.J. Hayden.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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This is a short easy to read book, packed with information.
C. Miserandino
The title does refer specifically to women, but I think the book can also be very useful for men.
Cynthia L. Armistead
I didn't like the fact that everyone mentioned apparently LOVES to work.
V. Conley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By V. Conley on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
I expected more in the way of coping skills and less in the way of trying to convince me to keep working despite illness.

I didn't need half of the book, which was essentially arguing that work is good for you. Most of us don't have the option to quit. I thought that point was moot. I wanted helpful advice.

I did get some comfort from the stories of other women's experiences. The discussions about taking the time you need so that you can do a better job left me feeling pretty vindicated (sometimes I feel a little guilty, and I liked the fact that this, too, was "normal." It seems as if that would be obvious, but it doesn't always feel that way).

I didn't like the fact that everyone mentioned apparently LOVES to work. In my opinion, work is neccesary so that you can do the things you WANT to do. It can be enjoyable, but it's not something I'd ever associate with the word "love." Ever.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Shannon B. Stidman on June 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
I feel like this book is only good for white collar career people. It doesn't help the rest of us just trying to get by. If you are blue collar, pink collar, or even military, this book will not help you. And she should have gone into the options Vocational Rehabilitation offers. She doesn't even have Vocational Rehabilitation in the index.

This book is further proof that people are clueless about the struggles the disabled working class face.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By L. Lynette Mejia on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
Women, Work and Autoimmune Disease, by Rosalind Joffe and Joan Friedlander, addresses an audience that would seem to be a niche until one comes upon the statistic that 20% of Americans live with chronic illnesses. This book gives women who live with the inconvenience and health issues related to these conditions a resource that is one part pep talk and three parts information and guidance.

Joffe and Friedlander cover everything from why it is important for women to keep their careers after being diagnosed to how to manage their time and care schedules with employment obligations. They write about the practical concerns of working despite illness as well as the emotional toll such a decision creates, and offer solutions for how to deal with both the good days and the bad. The information throughout is interspersed with numerous personal stories from both the authors and other women who have experienced the problems and triumphs of making the decision to continue working.

All in all, this book is informative, well-written, and an asset to any woman who finds herself in the position of learning to juggle health-issues with career obligations.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
This realistic look at the realities of chronic illness manages to be authoritative and comprehensive. In making their case that women with autoimmune diseases should continue their work and find ways to build their careers, they cite statistics, review research, and make reasoned arguments. I am particularly impressed at how the authors can be clear on the distinctions between their opinions and experiences, and facts.
In fact, the advice on finding balance; setting realistic goals; developing structure; communicating with supervisors, potential employers, and co-workers; acknowledging personal limitations without creating artificial limits; career building; and career planning are all valuable reading for anyone with any chronic health condition, whether the individual is male or female, whether the condition is autoimmune or not.
One shortcoming of the book, the only one I can cite, is that it deals almost exclusively with the college-educated white collar worker. The authors do assume the reader is fairly easy to employ, with marketable skills, some connections within the business world, and a good deal of resilience. I can accept that this allows the authors to focus on directing their advice and experience, but it must be acknowledged that this book is directed towards those who are concerned with continuing a career and those with choices rather than those looking for entry level work. They do encourage the use of a career counselor, who could assist anyone with or without a degree to identify their own skill sets and interests.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J.D. Bishop on April 4, 2009
Format: Paperback
I was expecting a book of more substance! I was hoping for some great "success" work/life stories for those with autoimmune diseases. What I got was -- get a good team so you can rely on them when needed & that they highly recommend starting a work-at-home business so one can work from bed if needed. It didn't leave me feeling very encouraged or uplifted. Perhaps it's good they didn't "sugarcoat" the reality of living with an autoimmune disease. Maybe they should change the title to match the content.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Chris on April 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
I received this book through the LibraryThing Earlier Reviewer program.

I started out thinking that this book would be of interest to me because of my autoimmune issues, but not particularly applicable to where I am in my life and career right now. As I read, I realized that aspects of it were relevant to me now, and that which aspects are relevant to me will undoubtedly change over time. I can see myself periodically rereading chapters of this book in order to get me thinking about where I am, what I'm doing, and where I want to end up - and how my autoimmune illnesses influence that without completely restricting my options. Further, I would think that many of the ideas and strategies covered in this book would be applicable to those suffering from other chronic health issues, not just autoimmune illnesses.

However, there were several things that really bothered me about this book. The first, and most obvious, was the use of "girlfriend" in the title and throughout the book. Were the authors trying to use it to connect with the reader? I found it to be jolting and artificial, as I did the exhortation to "develop my warrior spirit."

Additionally, when the authors defined the stages of chronic illness in Chapter 4 (denial, anger, grief, and acceptance), they mentioned Kubler-Ross's stages of grief but relegated those stages to their own "grief" step. However, I had the impression while reading, further enhanced by reviewing the Kubler-Ross stages later, that the authors' stages of chronic illness owed an awful lot to Kubler-Ross...

Two things that I particularly liked about the book were its friendly style (with the exception of the aforementioned use of "girlfriend") and the numerous stories and examples that were used throughout the book to illustrate various concepts and states of mind.
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