Womenomics and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.99
  • Save: $7.30 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Womenomics: Write Your Ow... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Metrolina Deals
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Book is in new condition but has been autographed by the author, dust jacket may have some very minor shelf wear but otherwise the book appears new & unread. Otherwise in fantastic shape. Ready to ship immediately directly from Amazon for FREE with Two-Day Air via Amazon Prime or Free Super Saver Shipping (Overnight available too). We offer free tracking, free no-hassle returns, and complete satisfaction or your money back!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Womenomics: Write Your Own Rules for Success Hardcover – June 2, 2009


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.69
$4.43 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Womenomics: Write Your Own Rules for Success + The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance---What Women Should Know + Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead
Price for all three: $51.87

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 69%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; 1 edition (June 2, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061697184
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061697180
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #685,574 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This collaboration between broadcasting powerhouses Shipman and Kay gives career women explicit permission to demand the balance that's been missing in their lives. The authors assert that after decades of trying to outdo men or fighting the Mommy Wars in the office trenches of the 1980s and 1990s, women have gained enough corporate clout to start changing the workplace to suit their needs. Shipman and Kay review the depth of women's influence as consumers and earners, maintaining that their power gives them the right and the ability to ask for flexibility in their work lives, to negotiate assertively and effectively, to say no and to give up the guilt associated with getting their needs met. Through Shipman and Kay's own stories of struggling with demanding work and home lives and anecdotes from other working mothers, the authors make a convincing argument that with some mental and emotional effort, women can create their ideal work and home lives. Filled with pragmatic and optimistic steps, this book will inspire readers to set in motion a flexibility-driven business revolution that can benefit all women and men, families and workforces. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“A personal, provocative and challenging book for career women who want less guilt, more life.” (Diane Sawyer)

“Womenomics describes the workplace trend that finally makes it possible for women to be successful and sane at the same time. And happily, it’s a recession-friendly formula. (Tina Brown, founder, The Daily Beast)

“Shipman and Kay have issued a rallying cry for women that is also a wake-up call for men. Our wives, daughters, sisters, and mothers are reshaping business as we know it. And that can make us all better off.” (Daniel H. Pink, author of A Whole New Mind)

“Without wasted words, Shipman and Kay provide practical suggestions for how you can take charge of your career with courage and confidence.” (Lois P. Frankel, Ph.D., author of Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office)

“Womenomics makes a compelling statement about the financial impact women can have in the workplace and offers valuable ideas for capitalizing on this trend, even in this economic climate.” (Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook)

“Buy a copy of Womenomics for yourself, your best friend, your daughter, your star employee, and even your boss.” (Cathie Black, president, Hearst Magazines and author of Basic Black)

“Employers should be listening to what talented women want and use this book to hold up their end of the bargain, so that the best and brightest can have both a job and a life.” (Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, and author of Confidence)

“Every woman who’s ever been knocked off course in the quest to have the elusive ‘all’ should run out and buy this book today!” (Dee Dee Myers, former White House press secretary and author of Why Women Should Rule the World)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

The book was well laid out and easy to read.
Gina B.
I am so thankful to Claire Shipman and Katty Kay for taking the time to share this information to women like us.
Vanessa Rice
The book is like the title--meant to suggest something new, but awkward and mostly useless.
Diane B. Wilkes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Womenomics is based on the premise that women are demanding new rules of engagement with the corporate world. Women achievers are not willing to sacrifice family and freedom. But many don't know how to go about negotiating for what they want, say the authors. They have to overcome their own guilt and fear, so they can ask for what they want.

The book's advice seems entirely sound and appropriate for senior women executives in many fields. The authors refer to women in politics, media, finance and other industries. They suggest very specific strategies to negotiate for a desirable work schedule. The best part of the book demonstrates what happens when companies stop worrying about face time and focus exclusively on results. Just about everyone who works for an organization has tales of useless meetings and absurd ideas about what constitutes work.

However, I will be interested to see if female executives find the book helpful. As a sometime career consultant, I believe that implementing these strategies calls for strong corporate political skills. You have to know just how and when to make your pitch. The women we meet here have demonstrated their ability to contribute uniquely to their organizations. Many hold competing offers so they're in very strong positions.

I'd also like to see more discussions of the trade-offs involved Turning down a lifetime opportunity to enjoy your child's first day at school may seem like a no-brainer. Later those opportunities may be gone and the world looks different when you're ten years older. Regrets go both ways.

Ultimately, I'm concerned that Womenomics suggests that only married women with children face challenges of juggling work and personal life.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Rushmore VINE VOICE on June 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The timing of this book's release is unfortunate. Women who work for more traditional companies and are somewhat desperate to keep their jobs don't think about carving out time for themselves. They want more hours. They don't want to make waves.

The authors are powerful and prominent women in a relatively creative environment. They have the luxury to seek balance in their work and personal lives. Also, many of the women profiled in this book can negotiate from a position of strength with their employers. The reality for many of us who work in more prosaic industries, whose companies see their top and bottom lines dwindling, in workplaces where layoffs have taken place or could at any time, is that we are grateful to have a job to come to, and we are not writing our own tickets. The sad part is that many women probably do pick up this book hoping for a magic bullet, only to discover that it might as well be fiction. It's not about us.

The authors do make an ineffective argument that their strategy is suited to hard times as well as boom times. Also, to their credit, their underlying message that all women do valuable work is important. However, it is not groundbreaking and not particularly convincing. If this book had come out in rosier financial times, it would have a much different impact. Instead, the authors seem out of touch and only remind many of us what we can't have. Not a message we need to hear right now.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By puccagirl73 VINE VOICE on November 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I usually devour a book on female empowerment like a cream puff, but it took me so long to finish this book, not just because it was hard to relate to but I was reading it carefully so I would not get the message wrong. This book is quite dated and very insulting for most of the women who are not employed in so called white collar jobs, if you ask for reduced hours you get reduced pay and benefits and no one will then take you seriously. In this new economic climate if you are less visible and asking for privileges just because of certain circumstances, like motherhood, then you are the first one out the door since the company is getting less out of you for the pay and benefits they give you. Most of the concepts are pure HR family/life balance propaganda that I was infinitely disappointed that this book was even written. Reality seems to have escaped the authors and it was published too late in this economic environment to garner agreement or sympathy with most of the target readers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C. Slocum on February 5, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book will be very helpful for women who fit the following demographic type:
-Aged Thirties or Forties, certainly not younger, with the cultural baggage that comes with that generation
-Thoroughly Established in Career
-Career is lucrative, self-driven, and portable
-Is a manager, executive, or other high ranked white collar profession
-Has children and likely a spouse
-Work/life issues are primarily existential and time-oriented, not financial

This book will be less helpful for those who are in occupations that require you show up to a given place at a given time, for women who had their children early in their careers, who do not command a lot of privilege. The crux of their argument is to rest on your laurels (they assume you have been working sixty hour weeks in a high prestige job up to the point of reading their book), taking a pay cut, taking a demotion, or other things that folks who work to survive may find very counter-productive.

The first few chapters about what women contribute to the work place are empowering, but after that, it stops reading as true-to-life. I am 26, and find a lot of my work/life problems tend to include things like finding affordable child-care - I have a flexible job, but it does not pay a family-supporting wage. I understand my problem is more typical for most working women. They discuss financial consequences perhaps twice in the book. It is otherwise all about time.

I struggled with the style of writing. It read a bit like an infomercial, - it read as though they were constantly trying to sell something, as opposed to a conversation. I wonder if the initial feedback of their book was that no one would buy their ideas, because it reads as pre-emptively defensive at points.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews