Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $3.73 (21%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Retroval
Condition: Used: Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Wonderland Avenue: Tales of Glamour and Excess (Abacus Books) Paperback – August 1, 1993


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.22
$11.69 $4.62
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"




Frequently Bought Together

Wonderland Avenue: Tales of Glamour and Excess (Abacus Books) + No One Here Gets Out Alive
Price for both: $30.22

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
  • No One Here Gets Out Alive $16.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: Abacus Books
  • Paperback: 462 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349101752
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349101750
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #522,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This achingly forthright account of heroin addiction and the madness of life in the L.A. rock-and-roll scene fairly crackles with reality. Sugerman ( No One Here Gets Out Alive ) tells of his well-heeled yet troubled childhood and of his association, begining at age 12, with the Doors, particularly his relationship with the band's nihilistic leader, Jim Morrison. Himself experimenting with drugs at the time Morrison OD'd, Sugerman developed an addiction, at the same time assuming more responsible and more visible positions with the Doors' organization. The author describes in wrenching detail his increasingly outrageous behavior which, because it was equalled or exceeded by his friends and associatesseveral of whom died during this periodwas perceived within his milieu as, if not normal, at least acceptable. Fortunately for Sugerman, he stopped his wild rush toward self-destruction just short of its realization. His facility with dialogue and his breakneck writing style complement perfectly the intensity of the subject matter.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

At age 13, the author of No One Gets Out of Here Alive ( LJ 9/15/80) and The Doors: The Illustrated History ( LJ 12/1/83) was given a job opening The Doors's fan mail and was on his way to becoming a successful rock music promoter. This book is the story of the next eight years of Sugerman's life, a time in which alcohol, parties, "the usual gaggle of weirdos andparade of girls, druggies, roadies, musicians, music-industry types, and fans" all contributed to a life-threatening drug problem and admission to a mental hospital. Sugerman maintains the innocence of youth in his dialogue, but his excellent descriptions are seasoned with the insight of a man who has lived for over a decade after having made the decision to live rather than give into drugs and dying.
- Donald W. Maxwell, Carmel Clay P.L., Carmel, Ind.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
52
4 star
11
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 67 customer reviews
Some parts of the book are very disturbing.
A. Amy
He quickly found himself drawn back into the sordid life of drugs, alcohol, sexual excess, and the like.
Steven Travers
From the mouth of Jim through the writing of Danny Sugerman.
Danger Clay

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Steven Travers on June 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
Danny Sugarman was a 14-year old kid living in the L.A. suburb of Westchester, near LAX. He was troubled, and did not like his step-father. He read an ad or heard about a rock band in Hollywood that was hiring a teenager to answer mail, so he went for and got the job. The band was The Doors. Getting from Westchester to Hollywood by bus is not all that easy, but he did it just about every day. Jim Morrison befriended him and told him not to let his parents addle his brain with Ritalin, an ironic anti-drug message coming from the Lizard King.
As a teenager, Sugarman accompanied Morrison on sojourns to the Sunset Strip, where despite his minority he was admitted to the rarified air of The Doors, The Byrds, and other classic California bands. His step-father was appalled.
Remarkably, despite his lifestyle, Sugarmnan was good enough at baseball to be offered a scholarship of some kind to play at UCLA, but his commitment to the band tugged at his dedication for the game, so he never went the diamond route.
As Morrison went downhill, so too did Sugarman. Unlike the song "No One Here Gets Out Alive", Sugarman managered, barely, to escape. After Jim's death, Sugarman picked himself up and lived in a house on Wonderland Avenue. It was all set up by Ray Manzaerek, the Doors' keyboardist extraordinaire. Manzarek, the "sensible one" among The Doors, wanted to continue the band, or at least his own musical career. Sugarman was hired to be the band's manager, and it was a lucrative life for a guy still in his early 20s. He quickly found himself drawn back into the sordid life of drugs, alcohol, sexual excess, and the like. The Wonderland address did not help, it being a small enclave off of Laurel Canyon, the famed street that connects West Hollywood with the San Fernando Valley.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Joe Sugerman on October 16, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Being a "coming of age journey" Danny's story is about struggle on several fronts. Missplaced guilt on himself for our parent's divorce. The interwoven conflict between the seduction of the rock and drug life style as exemplified by Morrison as a role model,versus sober living,our father's world. Danny's final struggle against addiction with ultimate death and coming back to life is pretty wrenching stuff. I keep copies of Wonderland in my office and frequently give one to young patients that seem troubled with similar issues. Danny never thought of himself as "great author". However, his story has a universality about it which makes reading it a touchstone in the lives of a lot of people. I get letters expressing thanks and telling me of the impact Wonderland Ave had on them. Before he died of lung cancer, I told my brother that he had immortalized himself and his times. He laughed softly, but it seemed to comfort him quite a bit.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By all love based paths lead to God on April 9, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is NOT moralizing. It is a super fun read! It is NOT a dry lecture about the dangers of drug addiction - read it because it is fun! That it has a 'message' is a bonus - the book itself is a masterpiece!

I love this book! I've read it twice and could not put it down! Danny's writing style is superb! I have read LOTS of books and this is my #2 favorite book of all time (after The Mists of Avalon)!

Very decadent but has tremendous redeeming value. Danny was press manager for The Doors, and this is his story....Witty, funny, outrageous! Danny's style of writing is SO incredible you really can't put this book down! (well after the first chapter anyway). And there is a bonus: after reading this with my son, he decided to become straight-edge! Note: has lots of sex, drugs, and rock n roll, not to mention excessive profanity. Not for the squeamish.

Interestingly, all of the reviews rave about this book except for one, and that one is by someone who obviously is very self-righteous and couldn't handle the sex drugs rock n roll. Too bad. His loss.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Audrey on January 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
the first time i read this book i was only a teenager and i don't remember reading it again for years. i don't even recall how this book came into my possession but i know i was grateful for it. i'd led a sheltered life and to read about someone's account of their painful existence was an eye-opener for me. this book may not be for everyone but it paved the way for my way of thinking today and i'm glad it landed in my hands.
not being a big fan of jim morrison probably gave me a more objective view towards danny sugerman because i wasn't likely to think that this was all about sugerman's obsession with morrison or the band. i read it as a raw account of sugerman's life from when he was an adolescent into adulthood, and his realisation that there was more out there for him than just drugs and excess. most of his friends are dead today. the fact that he's alive is amazing given what he's put his body through.
i have to read this book again soon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Best Of All on October 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
The extraordinary young life of Danny Sugerman is chronicled in this second book covering the L.A. scene of the 1960s and 1970s.

Jim Morrison has died, The Doors are attempting to hang on as a group, Sugerman is chasing his own demons and Detroit's answer to the Lizard King arrives on the scene. Iggy Stooge (Pop) becomes the icon of decadence; destroying luxury cars parked at the palatial homes of his young girlfriends, being so smashed that his mop of hair is used as a mop to clean a floor and - through it all - perhaps becoming the lead singer of The Doors.

Sugerman tries to keep Iggy together as the party that never stops rotates faster and faster. It is an end of an era of sorts as Sugerman tries to clean up before becoming yet another drug casuality while The Doors put together one last great gig and Iggy whirls through a self-destructive fantasy that only comes to an abrupt halt years later.

Sugerman lived through it....and survived, barely. The book ends as a cautionary tale of wandering onto a wonderland avenue, only to find out too late that it's a living hell.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?