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Wonderwall [Blu-ray]


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Wonderwall [Blu-ray] + The Magic Christian [Blu-ray] + The Beatles: Help! [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Jack MacGowran, Jane Birkin
  • Directors: Joe Massot
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Shout! Factory
  • DVD Release Date: March 25, 2014
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00HS3KV0G
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #52,805 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

• Publicity Gallery

• Publicity Text

• Biographies

• The Comic Art of Jack MacGowran

• Reflections on Love

• The Art of Marijke

• Eric Clapton - Skiing

• John Lennon Poem

• The Remo Four Music Video

• Theatrical Trailer

• Outtakes.

• Theatrical Cut and Director's Cut


Editorial Reviews

Since its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in 1968, Wonderwall has remained one of the quintessential films of the psychedelic movement. Featuring a score composed by George Harrison and performed by an all-star ensemble of musicians including George Harrison, Ringo Starr and Eric Clapton, Wonderwall’s kaleidoscope of images set to Harrison's soundtrack catapult the audience into a lost world of innocence, where love and laughter reign supreme.


Set in swinging 1960's London, Wonderwall is the story of a reclusive professor Oscar Collins (Jack MacGowran) who becomes infatuated with his next door neighbors, the beautiful model Penny Lane (Jane Birkin) and her Svengalian photographer boyfriend (Iain Quarrier). When the professor attempts to rescue Penny from an overdose following a quarrel with her boyfriend, he enters the magical realm of the Wonderwall on a transformative journey, and returns to his laboratory a changed man.

Customer Reviews

The music enhances the brilliant innovations in film being done at the time.
Amazon Customer
Readers might think it strange that a review of the DVD should focus so much on the music but my rationale in doing so lies more in my perception of George Harrison.
Junglies
True, she may not be a feminist ideal, you may not compare Nietzsche to Camus with her, but then would you want Ally McBeal for a lawyer?
CavemanPlato

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By jim yoakum on January 24, 2002
Format: DVD
Unlike similar "psychedelic" films of the 60s, Wonderwall is one of the few to successfully capture the look and feel of what now appears to be a mythic time when creativity and freedom in cinema was not only new and exciting - but mainstream. Wonderwall will not be for everyone, but it will appeal to those who can appreciate the off-beat and provocative. It will challenge you but also reward you with brilliant performances and one of the best-ever soundtracks (by the late George Harrison). Psychedelic? You bet. But that term does not do justice to what is simply a charming "period piece" that still resonates today for those who like intelligent cinema. A must-have.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Hughes on November 11, 2003
Format: DVD
An earlier reviewer called this a period piece, and I think that's exactly the right spirit needed to enjoy the film.
For those of us too young to remember 1969, this is a rather remarkable time capsule of values and social relationships. Most striking is the sense that the film seems to have been made by young people with really no idea of how older people live their lives. That wouldn't be a great problem, except that the film itself takes the generation gap as its central feature: how an older man living a boring, empty, unfulfilling life glimpses (but cannot participate in) the colorful, uninhibited, sensual lives of younger people.
On the other hand, while the film is clearly enamored with the hip glamor of youth and beauty, it also suggests that young people bridge the gender gap principally to have sex with each other. Otherwise, they don't have much to say. Strange! I remember getting that same sense from The Graduate (not to compare the two).
Anyway, I think the dvd is recommendable. Good picture, good music (of course), very good extras, and an interesting snapshot of a time and place.
-
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jim Yoakum on August 12, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Penned by Roman Polanski's scriptwriter, Gerard Brach, "Wonderwall" is a mildly trippy look at obsession and repression, voyerism and sex. The plot is simplicity itself: a mild-mannered professor finds a spyhole in his living room which allows him to become involved in a world of young, Mod, Londoners (circa 1967). Through this hole (his "wonderwall") the professor becomes entwined in a world of fantasy and sexual chemistry and becomes both transformed and the transformer. Directed by the talented Joe Massot (also known for directing Zeppelin's "Song Remains the Same" and the equally wonderfully weird "Zachariah"), "Wonderwall" is filled with bright colour, groovy sounds and a decidedly 60's visual style. It's also been digitally spiffed up and features extended soundtrack music (by George Harrison). My only personal disappointment is with Jack MacGowran, who plays the professor. While he is a brilliant actor, and was wonderful in "How I Won The War", I find him slightly miscast here. But, all-in-all, "Wonderwall" is a minor treat.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By E. Steven Fried on December 17, 2004
Format: DVD
Based on a story by frequent Polanski collaborator, Gerard Brach and produced a year after Fearless Vampire Killers, which also featured performances by Jack MacGowran and Iain Quarrier, this is marvelous little piece, light and yet moving, filled with wonderful visuals, a nifty performance by MacGowran and a wonderful score by everyone's favorite Beatle, George. A plain synopsis doesn't do it any justice. Yes, it's about a daffy old guy who peers in on a lovely young woman living next door, but there's nothing creepy or pathetic about it. In fact, he's actually quite a bit of a dashing and romantic figure in his own detached, weird way. One of the most notable things about the film is the art direction by the Dutch band/art collective The Fool. A sort of lesser Incredible String Band that served for a while as the Beatles in-house designers, they made the most of what was most likely a thin budget by pouring every ounce of energy into dressing two amazing, Assheton Gorton designed, sets for the adjacent apartments of the old man and the young model. They are, without a doubt, two of the coolest looking places to live I have ever seen in a movie (I would give my eye-teeth to live in either one of those flats) and they form as much of a part of the main characters as the portrayal by the actors themselves. The old scientist lives in Celtic-Medieval warren, inspired by Pre-Raphaelite design, and the young model lives in a mod Sixties psychedelic/glam environment suffused with overtones of 20's/30's nostalgia. Both apartments then are filled with a yearning for the past and so, the old man becomes no more of a romanticist than the girl, despite his age. He is actually quite dashing in his cape and tuxedo when engaging in some of his later escapades, like some bandit out of a Fantomas picture.Read more ›
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By CavemanPlato on March 14, 2001
Format: DVD
Wonderwall
I purchased Wonderwall and Rear Window on the same day. When I got them I realized they were both movies about looking, about interiority and desire. Rear Window is, of course, one of the greatest work of cinema art. On the other hand, Wonderwall (thankfully made available by Rhino video) is in an altogether different category. How to categorise it? Pulp, low art, pop, guilty-pleasure, who can say? For me it was a moving and beautiful film in its own way, a slice of the 60s zeitgiest, (so different form the mini-series versions of recent years) a chance to feel the real possibilties floating in the culture before nihilism, fundamentalism and greed became fashionable. George Harrison's music is terrific. There's even a poem by John Lennon on the DVD extras. The colors and art in the film are also period: they hearken to the psychedelic work of Peter Max, the posters for groups like Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead. But, most of all, one can glimpse the 60s version of the beautiful in the form of Jane Birken, who plays a fashion model. Each age has its concept of beauty, as the film points out by movie posters of earlier screen sirens on the apartment walls, and Jane Birken really captured the original free spirit waif long before Kate Moss revived it. Birken really shares her perky charms in this movie, her cat like playfulness. True, she may not be a feminist ideal, you may not compare Nietzsche to Camus with her, but then would you want Ally McBeal for a lawyer? Movies from this period are hard to find so lets hope Rhino and Criterion continue there good work of porting this time to DVD. Don't miss Jane Birken's other nimble foray onto DVD in May Morning.
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