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Woodworking for the serious beginner Unknown Binding – 1995


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 175 pages
  • Publisher: distributed by Lyons & Burford (1995)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006FBCO2
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

There is a lot of potential confusion and expense in the stage between having a strong interest in woodworking and actually building a functional workshop. Woodworking for the Serious Beginner will get you from the former place to the latter in the straightest and most economical line. Authors Pamela Philpott-Jones and Paul L. McClure advise on which tools to purchase first, which tools not to purchase, how basic hand and power tools work, how to clean and maintain them, how to avoid injury, and how to build basic woodworking skills with well-diagrammed, detailed exercises. The beginning woodworking projects, explained in detail, fill practical needs such as a first basic workbench, shop horses, and table-saw accessories. Readers not only learn simple woodworking techniques, but also end up with a fully configured workshop. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

There seem to be two schools of thought on how beginners should approach woodworking: one dictates learning fundamentals and getting lots of practice, and the other requires buying lots of expensive tools. Here, the authors cover some fundamentals but lean heavily toward the latter school. McClure is a professional woodworker and Philpott-Jones is a beginner (her repeated statements to that effect and remarks about the difficulty of woodworking detract from the text). The first half of the book is devoted to buying and the second half shows how to build a workbench and router table. The section on safety is excellent. Better choices for libraries serving beginners include Peter Kom's Working with Wood (Taunton, 1993) and the three-volume Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking (Vol. 1, LJ 2/1/86). Only the most comprehensive collections should consider this title.?Jonathan Hershey, Akron-Summit Cty. P.L., Ohio
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Zenbob on July 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book, while well-intentioned, is not the best guide for a new woodworker. Somehow the authors lost sight of their target audience (I mean, why call it "for serious beginners" if you're not going to present your material for that group?). A better book by far, whether you are a beginner or more experienced in woodworking, is The Complete Manual of Woodworking by Albert Jackson, et al. Jackson's book is twice as big, has many more illustrations, many more resources for virtually the same money. And it will always be there, with reference material and good solid guidance. This book has a few projects but really does not deliver on helping the beginner, serious or not, become more adept at woodworking.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a neophyte to woodworking, I found the book helpful in determining what I needed to get started. The suggested order of purchasing tools was helpful in that it made me plan my purchases on the most versatile tools first, without initially spending money on single use or specialty tools. Also, the projects outlined at the end of the book were useful in outfitting my shop
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "mrisaac" on February 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
I am a fairly experienced rough carpenter, who is going into finish carpentry more and more for fun. I recently purchased this book without really reviewing its contents. I found the book had some nice start-up projects for a beginner. Though I am probably a bit advanced for this book, I read though it and found some nice tips. I soon plan on building myself a woodworking shop and I just might start off with the workbench, router table and tool cabinet detailed in this book. The only negative, if any, was that the book was a little over-explanitive for me. I guess that is better than under-explanitive. I do wonder though, unless the unexperienced beginner is very patient and doesn't mind having to learn everything from scratch and from a book, how far someone can accomplish these task without any help.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By R Ferrer on March 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
The title really says it. I don't really like woodworking classes, because there never seems to be enough time in each session. Just when you get rolling, it's time to go. This book helped me take steps to get out of the classroom and start creating my own shop at home. I like the fact that the authors not only advised which power tools I needed first, but they reasoned why I didn't need other power tools, some to begin with, some not at all. That's great when you consider the money involved.
Getting two perspectives from the authors (woodworker hobbyist and master woodworker) is nice. I got a sense of learning from true, personal experience. It's not the only book I read in the shop, just part of my foundation. If they came out with another one, I'd read it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
After buying many books, this book was recommended by some of the people in the woodworking news group. Having just bought my first table saw, and not knowing how to use it, this book answered all my questions. The projects are easy to follow and made learning the basics easy. I have made everything except the router table which I am working on now. The only advice that was missing is "don't buy your lumber at the local home improvement store".
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Martin on June 8, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book for the beginning woodworker. The strongest section, and my reason for buying this book, is an introductory one on buying tools. The authors are very opinionated here, and urge the reader which tools to buy first (a table saw, a router, and a handheld jigsaw), which to avoid entirely (the radial arm saw) and which to defer until later (the band saw, the compound miter saw). The advice is good: start out with the most versatile tools, move to the specialized ones later. Some would disagree with these choices, but I think it is pretty sound advice, which won't steer the beginner wrong. The authors include some good information for choosing the right tools as well. The section isn't as thorough as specialized books like Jim Tobin's Table Saw Magic, but it is broader, and probably good enough for starters.

After a good section on the safe use of power tools, the authors move on to the construction of a small number of simple projects desig!ned to add to the woodworker's shop. The projects range from a simple miter gauge extension to a router table and a router bit cabinet. Whether or not you are interested in these particular projects, reading these sections gives a good background introduction to the use of these tools. You can see how some simple joinery is done, and how the work is measured, glued and clamped. The authors assume no background whatsoever, and the book is well targeted at the rank beginner.

I enjoyed the writing style, which is easygoing and conversational. I also enjoyed the juxtaposition of two viewpoints, one beginner, one expert. I really enjoyed reading this book. That is a rare statement in the world of how-to literature.

Unfortunately, this is not a book which reaches much beyond the beginner level. After the first few projects, most readers will not refer to it again. There are other books which will prove better investments in the long run.
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