Buy New
$33.60
Qty:1
  • List Price: $49.99
  • Save: $16.39 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Thursday, April 17? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Word Biblical Commentary: Volume 38A, Romans 1-8 Hardcover – October 26, 1988


Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover, October 26, 1988
"Please retry"
$33.60
$24.50 $18.98

Frequently Bought Together

Word Biblical Commentary: Volume 38A, Romans 1-8 + Word Biblical Commentary, Vol. 38B, Romans 9-16 + The Epistle to the Romans (New International Commentary on the New Testament)
Price for all three: $97.77

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Hardcover: 513 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (October 26, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0849902371
  • ISBN-13: 978-0849902376
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 2.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #51,408 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Peltz, student of the New Testament on July 1, 2003
Commentaries are written with a variety of audiences in mind. Some are pitched at a "popular" level; they are accessible to Christians who do not have a degree in theology (and they may not be very helpful, since they tend to rehearse familiar ideas). Some are a little meatier, intended to aid preachers in sermon preparation. And some are written at an academic level; they debate the positions of other scholars.
The Word Biblical Commentary series tries to address both of the latter two audiences. The commentaries provide assistance to scholars, preachers, and other serious students of the Bible.
Word imposes a rigid format. Authors must begin each passage with a bibliography, followed by a translation with notes on the Greek manuscripts. Next there is a "form and structure" section which discusses grammatical and thematic links with other passages and calls attention to the literary techniques employed by the biblical author. Next there is a "comment" section which is quite detailed, allowing some room for interaction with other scholars. Finally there is an "explanation" section, which summarizes the message of the text without repeating all the technical details.
Word's format inevitably introduces some repetition. For busy preachers, the trick is to zero in on the explanation section. Preachers will value the other sections of the commentary when there is a theological or textual problem which merits closer examination.
Dunn's commentary succeeds brilliantly at both levels. Dunn is a leading authority in Pauline studies. His "new perspective on Paul" builds on the work of E. P. Sanders and has attracted the attention of scholars including N. T. Wright.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Sackmary on March 28, 2011
Verified Purchase
I am a graduate of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (Master of Divinity with Biblical Languages). I preach at least twice a month, in addition to writing one paper per month. This is all in addition to my paying job as an Engineer. Because my time is at such a premium, I am always glad to try different commentaries on the Greek and Hebrew texts. Some of you may use a commentary differently than I do. For me, a commentary is my last stop before I write the sermon (or paper). First comes all my own reading and translating of the text. Then I compare my translation to the main English translations (NASB, NEV, NIV, KJV). After all that work, then comes time to read some commentaries.

This is the first volume of the WBC that I have ever tried. Therefore, I cannot speak for the series. This particular volume is very helpful. The author (James Dunn) does an outstanding job of listing all his references. He provides a survey of the opinions of a multitude of Bible scholars, before offering his own opinion. This is precisely how a commentator should write a commentary. Even though I do not agree with every conclusion that Dunn makes, I very much appreciate the amount of work which went into this volume.

For those of you are familiar with the EBC (Expositor's Bible Commentary), the WBC (Word Biblical Commentary) on Romans has more survey of what other writers have said and less analysis of the Greek words. Both commentaries are useful and both have their shortcomings. If you are a full-time preacher (or professor) and have time to read all the original source materials from commentator throughout the ages, this volume might not be for you.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Lubitz on December 27, 2012
Verified Purchase
This is a great commentary for students and those who have deeper study needs. Dunn is well-known and presents information to help the student understand the first part of Romans.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jacques Schoeman on February 3, 2013
The New Perspective on Paul is a pact between scholars who belong to a critical school of thought that endorses a new reading of what Paul really said. Specific attention is therefore paid to the apostle Paul amongst the NT authors. But this is not entirely a 'new' perspective. In 1826 FC Baur introduced a philosophical paradigm shift in hermeneutics, one which would embrace doubt. This shift started to critically infiltrate scholarly understanding and negatively control their interpretation of Scripture. Jimmy Dunn has noted deviations from historical exegesis, and this commentary is no exception.

Dunn errs in regard to Paul's contrast in 3:5 ("our unrighteousness" vs. "God's righteousness"). He comments that this confirms 'its strong covenant significance for Paul as denoting God's action in favor of His people.' p 134 According to Douglas Moo what is actually under discussion is 'God's faithfulness to His person and word, particularly as verse 4b reveals' (Romans, p 190). God's response to sin does not nullify His attribute or His commitment to His Word, for God cannot deny Himself or His Word. Professor John Murray made a similar call, one that finds God acting for His own sake: 'our unbelief of the promises does not make void God's faithfulness' (Romans 1:96).

Dunn goes toe-to-toe with 'generations of commentators'. He mocks their exegesis of 3:20 as completely missing the point, directing the charge at 'Reformation exegesis [which] largely missed...the hidden middle term.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa525d51c)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?