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50 Words For Snow

November 21, 2011 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 21, 2011
  • Release Date: November 21, 2011
  • Label: Anti/Epitaph
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:05:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0065IBZI2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (144 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,901 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

131 of 148 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Hodson VINE VOICE on November 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After more than 30 years of writing and recording music unlike anything anyone else produces, Kate Bush, a serious artist disguised as an almost accidental pop star, is as well-known for her musical eccentricities as for her imaginative lyrics, stunning vocals, and lush aural landscapes, and there is no doubt that "50 Words for Snow" could only have been conceived and created by Kate Bush. From the first moments of its quiet opening piano chords and choir-boy vocal performed by her son, Bertie, she takes us on a journey deep into the heart of Winter in a series of seven songs, each of which revels in the contemplative and introspective, rather as if we're sitting with her by a fire while she sits at her piano musing on the nature of love, life, language, and the album's central theme, snow. It's an incredibly intimate experience, listening to the first three tracks: "Snowflake," in which Bertie sings the role of a falling snowflake which Bush encourages to 'keep falling, I'll find you' as she repeats the sad refrain, 'The world is so loud'; "Lake Tahoe," in which she and and counter-tenor Stefan Roberts tell the story of a Victorian woman's ghost who keeps appearing to wander around the cold lake, calling to her lost dog; and, perhaps strangest and most intriguing of all, "Misty", an unabashedly sensual song about a snowman who comes to life and makes love to the narrator, leaving her alone in soaked sheets and covered with bits of dead leaves in the morning. This triptych is built around Bush's simple vocals, jazzy piano, Steve Gadd's quiet but precise drumming, and bassist Danny Thompson's lovely bass lines, becoming denser and more complex as the songs progress.Read more ›
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55 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Karen Newcombe on November 23, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Of any living musical artist, Kate Bush is the one who best understands her materials - music, voice, silence and words - and how to use them. She confessed in an interview this week (Nov 22, 2011) that she has lost interest in writing pop songs. For anyone else this would be a disaster; for Kate and for us it is a godsend. Pop music is really for teenagers after all; this album is for grownups. In 50WFS Kate has pared back her trademark lush layering of sound to key elements, yet they are used more artfully than in any of her previous work. It is recognizably Kate, but with a new kind of muscle and power that calls to mind the martial artist - someone who is at once both peacefully gentle and powerfully able - even dangerous.

You should listen to this album as an album: snow is a subtle, fragile, beautiful and often deadly substance. As we move into the songs we are guided through landscapes of beauty, death, absence, mystery, unification, humor and joy. Each song tells a story, yet all are united through Kate's unique musical approach. As one interviewer joked with her, "They won't be singing THESE songs on the X Factor." No indeed. 50WFS is in another class entirely. You likely won't get it on the first listen, and you may not get it on the third or fourth. But keep listening and the songs will open up, you'll begin to understand the great artistry at work here. Then your heart, too, will be caught up.

Only Kate has the mastery to take something as trivialized in popular culture as the Yeti and return to it the full mystery and elusiveness of the being that the lamas claim is a god.
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57 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Jason Monaghan on November 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD
It may surprise people to think about it in these terms, but Kate Bush has been startling audiences with her unique artistic vision in a recording career that now extends across five decades.

She first burst into public view as a teenager in 1978 with her hit single "Wuthering Heights" and debut album The Kick inside. It was then - and remains today - difficult to comprehend that a work so accomplished, so fully realised (and at times, so deeply personal and confronting) could have been produced by a precocious 19 year old.

The 1980s would prove to be challenging decade for many artists who thrived in the 70s. But Bush flourished, producing a peerless trilogy of boldly experimental and startlingly beautiful albums: The Dreaming (1982); Hounds of Love (1985) and The Sensual World (1989). While the 1990s would prove to be more difficult for Bush artistically (and in some respects personally), after a 12 year absence, she returned in 2005 triumphantly, and at the peak of her powers, with the release of the ambitious double album Aerial.

And now, in another new decade, Kate Bush has, for the first time since 1978, rewarded her patient admirers with two new releases. It is probably fair to say that the first of these two, Director's Cut - which featured reworked material from two earlier albums - confused, and divided her very passionate fans in a way that none of her earlier releases had.

However, there is every reason to believe that 50 Words For Snow will come to be viewed as yet another startling triumph. Apart perhaps from the first single, "Wild Man", 50 Words, bears little discernable relationship sonically to anything she has produced before. Its lengthy tracks (only 7 songs over a 65 minute playing time) are linked by the snowy theme.
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