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Work, Sex, Money: Real Life on the Path of Mindfulness Paperback – February 8, 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Chögyam Trungpa shows us how to uncover our innate strength, confidence, and joy under any circumstances."—Pema Chödrön

"Powerful dharma encouragement to awaken our own fearless and wise heart—from one of the most remarkable and brilliant teachers of modern times."—Jack Kornfield

"Chögyam Trungpa offers us a rich banquet with many inviting, intriguing, and delicious glimpses into the Buddhist perspective on our mind and life."—Daniel Goleman

"Chögyam Trungpa's new book provides the longed-for missing link between deeply powerful teachings on spirituality and the realities of twenty-first century life in the West. Personally, I am beyond grateful."—Susan Piver, author of The Wisdom of a Broken Heart

Work, Sex, Money is a terrific reminder of Trungpa’s great gift to American Buddhism.”—Buddhadharma: The Practitioner’s Quarterly

About the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala; 1 edition (February 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590305965
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590305966
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #178,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By John L Murphy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
Rather than stick to a notion that escaping the city, fleeing from making a living, and eluding the relationships to pursue and bills to pay that make up ordinary responsibility, Chögyam Trungpa urges the listener to embrace the everyday, for there lies the challenge to find balance between the demands of the spirit and the necessities of the body, and in overcoming the dualism that we falsely view as keeping these two apart. In these talks, mostly from the early 1970s, the newly arrived Trungpa tells his American audiences that the spiritual journey takes in the real world. While not really for a beginner to the dharma, the Shambhala (or somewhat secularized) content of some chapters and the down-to-earth advice seems accessible to everyone, even if intended for American Buddhists in the Age of Aquarius.

He often criticizes "spiritual materialism," the solidifying of the ego into some mystic flight that only traps the self rather than liberating it into a rarified realm. For, the compassionate approach makes us look at the mundane, to find in it our destiny: to seek inspiration in the irritating surroundings in which we were raised, as our "true scripture." Speaking at a time when many sought "back to nature" as a panacea, he sharply corrects his listeners and connects their misconceptions, for the familiar must be confronted, and compassion must arise in the offices, cities, suburbs, and homes of a less romantic life.

Learning to admire without possessing what one marries, sleeps with, works for, and accumulates means not to grasp at a spouse, a job, a product, or a lifestyle. This is where the title of the book matters.
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Format: Paperback
I expect a little brain melt and rereading for comprehension in Buddhist philosophy, but this was 70% brain melt. In 50 years of reading everything from physics to literature I've never thought "huh?" so many times.

Stretching the brain to accommodate new ideas isn't a bad thing, but I bought this book for practical ideas. Title words like "real life" and "Work Sex Money," seem to imply something more concrete than what this books offers. I'm happy with concepts that I figure out how to apply on my own, but this is almost abstract poetry.

"Resistance to creativity also comes from being unwilling to relate to the earth." I was hoping for something like: when people are in conflict, it helps to consider...

"But a true approach to mysticism would involve appreciating the mysteriousness of the play of phenomena, which is not really hidden from you." What is true about an approach to mysticism? And what does it have to do with work, sex and money? I was hoping for something like: grasping is why people are troubled about sex and here's how you might learn to let go.

I really wanted examples like: My friend John used to work 80 hour weeks so he could make more money even though he already had plenty. Then one day he...

Yes, I know I suffer from expectations and judging. I'm working on that, but could use some practical tips. Maybe this book is brilliant and I'm just not ready for it.
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Format: Paperback
Why it has taken me so long to read Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche I have no idea. I do know that I will be picking up a few more of his books, soon, as his words are as transparent as you can get.

In "Work, Sex, Money", Chogyam cuts through the ritual and prose of many books on the subjects. His explanations, and advice, are tactics we can all easily adapt to our lives. Each subject is broken down simply, and our attachments to them are clearly defined.

He challenges us to combat our own egos, checking our intention when it comes to compassionate action. He says, " The popular, confused notion of compassion suggests a certain idea of charity, which is trying to be kind because you feel you are well off and therefore you should be kind to others who are not well off."

I thought about this line for a while, and thought I'd remembered teachers always saying that those that are wealthy, should most definitely offer more because they have more. And it is right, as is CTR. It is all about intention though. If it's meant to pity someone, it is not compassion. If it is done clearly, and with heart, that is compassion.

One of the other points he makes in the book is a concept I have never pondered, but will truly bring this into my every day practice. He says, "In the materialistic round of life, there are endless advertisements for things to buy, and endless things are produced, but nobody explains how to clear everything away-- how to dispose of the garbage."

Why have I never thought about that? Seriously, does any of us think that when we are buying the latest flat-screen, that new MacBook or anything else we "need" to have?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Interesting application of Buddhist practices and principles to everyday urban life... My only critique would be that the writing style gets circular, looping around while going back and forth through examples of "extremes"... This writing style lost me time and time again on the actual practical application of these concepts... Otherwise it's a very interesting and relevant read...
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