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A Workbook for New Testament Syntax: Companion to Basics of New Testament Syntax and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Paperback – July 30, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; Workbook edition (July 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310273897
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310273899
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Daniel B. Wallace (PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is a noted textual critic, serving as head of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts, and is author of Greek Grammar beyond the Basics, Basics of New Testament Syntax, and (with Grant Edwards) of A Workbook for New Testament Syntax.



Grant Edwards (ThM, Princeton Theological Seminary) is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Birmingham in the UK.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By J. Collier on September 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
Just a note here in response to the reviews. A key is available from the publisher for instructors and self-learners. Simply send an email request to deskcopyrequest [AT] Zondervan [dot] com.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By J. E. Komoszewski on September 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
The Workbook for New Testament Syntax is simply an outstanding pedagogical tool. The book progresses from simpler Greek to more complex Greek as it moves through the twenty lessons. By the time the 19th lesson rolls around, the Greek is quite challenging: Acts 13 and 18! But working through the programmed lessons, starting out with John 1, the authors have succeeded in enabling students who have just come out of first-year Greek to build their syntactical knowledge to the point where they can translate and think exegetically through some of the toughest Greek of the NT by the time they get through the book. Instead of eliciting stellar examples of each grammatical category, as a standard grammar would do, it focuses on passages that are theologically rich (with the Kenosis appearing in two different lessons because of its importance), grammatically rich (with the grammatical form that occupies that particular lesson), and important exegetically. Altogether, the lessons draw from 18 different NT books. The students translate nearly 400 verses from the NT and get exposure to every one of the more common grammatical uses (as defined by Wallace's arrowed system of identification). It is obvious that a great deal of thought has gone into this volume.

Vocabulary that occurs less than 50 times in the NT is supplied with each lesson, making it easy for the student to dive right in. As well, an introductory paragraph adequately informs the student about the context of the text to be translated.

Each lesson has a built-in 100 point value (though a few have more than that, with some bonus points built into the lesson). The numerical value of each question is listed in brackets, with the constituent elements broken down. Thus, for example, on p.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Rex Howe on September 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
Length: 2:39 Mins
This is a review for the New Testament Syntax Workbook by Dr. Daniel B. Wallace and Grant G. Edwards, which should accompany Dr. Wallace's ExSyn a.k.a. Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics.
I worked through the WB with a friend last summer and found that it more than prepared me for my Intro to Exegesis course at Dallas Theological Seminary. The WB challenges those who have labored through Wallace's grammar to wrestle with actual syntactical issues throughout the NT. Two of my favorite elements were 1) that it presented a structured context for doing syntax in various areas of the NT and 2) that it did NOT include a key. I was glad that it did not. Too often, as we do course work or personal study, we depend too much upon keys, and they become more of a crutch rather than a help. Without it, the student is forced to wrestle and labor over the syntactical options that he or she has been learning about in the grammar. I would suggest working through the WB first without the key, and then requesting a copy from the appropriate source - either your prof or if you are using the WB for personal study, directly through Zondervan Publishing. I have found Zondervan to be more than accommodating in similar matters. Important note: the answer key is FREE through Zondervan for profs and self learners: email Jesse Hillman at jesse.hillman [at] zondervan [dot] com.
Good studies to you; keep wrestling with the issues!

In Christ,
Rex Howe
[...]
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By E. Reynolds on October 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
The workbook is a useful tool, but it would be much more useful if it had a key available. Syntax is a very subjective science, and it would be helpful to know what the author considers to be the correct answers to the syntax questions. He clearly has answers in view, but the answers are not always clear to the student, or even to the teacher. The scoring system is a bit opaque as well. Neither the students nor the teacher can figure it out. Why not make it more obvious, or just leave the scoring to the teacher? Laboring over the creation of a key is not my idea of every teacher's favorite task, and it is particularly stressful when the answers are as subjective and unclear as in these syntax exercises. On the positive side, I have not seen a better syntax workbook. It has many features to commend it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert D. Marcello on September 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
If you read the "acknowledgments" page I was one of the initial students in the class who tested the workbook before Zondervan went to print with it. I have to say that the workbook has been very helpful. So much so, that I actually own two copies! I wanted to work through it more than once.

Since the workbook is designed for an intermediate level, the texts are grouped around syntactical issues. The difficulty steadily increases as one works through the material. Instead of working through a lengthy biblical text and randomly happening upon a syntactical issue, the issues become the framework and example texts are given as case studies. I think this is a great way to tackle NT Greek syntax; since it immerses the student in the text while primarily focusing on the syntax at hand. Furthermore it give a "real life" feel"to working through these issues. At bottom, I cannot think of a better way to regularly involve students in learning Greek syntax. It is a must have for intermediate students.

Educators can get an answer key free of charge from Zondervan. I am glad for this. Otherwise, there would be cheat-sheets running around everywhere. Also, educators can get a free instructor's copy from Zondervan, and if they approve of the text then order their student's copies through Amazon (of course!).
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