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10 Reviews
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good understanding for what motivates difficult people
I bought this book when it first came out over a decade ago. It's a classic (or should be). It covers the behavior in groups (e.g. "Pushy/Presumtious People", "Exploitive People") and further divides each group into how it is manifested in Bosses, Peers, and Suborbdinates. The author is very perceptive in describing the patterns, what insecurities...
Published on January 19, 2002 by noellefong

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Only an OK book
There is some useful information in the book. The book is divided into many different situations and types of people and this is useful. However many sections are very shallow and it seems that the sections that deal with the most difficult people tend to blame it on the recipient rather than the perpetrator. Also, there is a tendency to helplessness in the face of the...
Published on January 3, 2003 by James H. McDuffie


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good understanding for what motivates difficult people, January 19, 2002
By 
"noellefong" (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
I bought this book when it first came out over a decade ago. It's a classic (or should be). It covers the behavior in groups (e.g. "Pushy/Presumtious People", "Exploitive People") and further divides each group into how it is manifested in Bosses, Peers, and Suborbdinates. The author is very perceptive in describing the patterns, what insecurities drive people to behave that way, and methods for dealing with them. The advice is very practical and appropriate to the case. Sometimes it's on the order of "give them some attention to get a return", sometimes it's "define your boundaries" and sometimes it's "this is toxic, walk away."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Only an OK book, January 3, 2003
By 
James H. McDuffie (Huntsville, Alabama United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
There is some useful information in the book. The book is divided into many different situations and types of people and this is useful. However many sections are very shallow and it seems that the sections that deal with the most difficult people tend to blame it on the recipient rather than the perpetrator. Also, there is a tendency to helplessness in the face of the worst offenders, i.e. there is nothing you can do. In reality this is seldom the case. But the desired actions may be dramatic and have far reaching consequences. It seems the book is written so as to offend none when some should be offended.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Read "Winning with Difficult People" instead, April 17, 2002
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Try reading "Winning with Difficult people" instead of this book. This book did tell me about certain types of people and how to deal with them, but it didn't go into deal about why they are the way they are to others.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book for Dealing With People At Work, May 29, 2005
Solomon (not King Solomon, but does have some of his wisdom) has written a good book for dealing with workers of three different classes: bosses, colleagues, and subordinates. The book is also broken down into 10 major areas in dealing with all three types:

1. Hostile/Angry.

2. Pushy/Presumptuous.

3. Deceitful/Underhanded.

4. Shrewd/Manipulative.

5. Rude/Abusive.

6. Egotistical/Self-Centered.

7. Proscrastinating/Vacillating.

8. Rigid/Obstinate.

9. Tight-Lipped/Taciturn.

10. Complaining/Critical.

Each section also contains:

1. A brief definition of the person and the personality characteristics typically displayed.

2. Hypothetically what you may be thinking of that person.

3. What the person hypothetically may be thinking about you and the work place.

4. A strategy for dealing with that person.

5. Tactical talk - suggested actual words you may use.

6. Closing tips on what else you can do.

I enjoyed the narrative's smooth flow and practical advice. However, I sometimes believe the author treated the situation and offender with kid gloves. In today's work environment, bosses, colleagues, and subordinates have to be decisive and firm with problem employess who threaten to disrupt a work environment that is already tense due to the nature of work and long hours put in by many employees. Sometimes you just have to either let people go or put them in a situation where they will have to adjust their behavior to get along!

I would recommend the book as a primer, not the last word on workplace relations. There are other ones out there (John Maxwell, Max Dupree, Larry Burkett, etc.) who may give more substantative advice on dealing with people in the work place. Still a good read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Resource., August 28, 2008
I have recommend this book often over the years. Unlike other similar titled books, Solomon takes the approach of dealing with varyious personality types from different perspectives - form a subordinate, peer, or boss POV. Same issue - but if not managed from the proper perspective can be lethal and blow up. (Try treating your biligerent boss like you would a biligerent subordinate and see what happens!) Highly recommended for new managers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sensible guide, April 11, 2008
This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
What is it about the human race? To paraphrase Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy LaSorda, 80% of people don't want to hear about your problems, and the other 20% are happy you're having trouble. Those 20%, that is the backstabbers, saboteurs, sadists, know-it-alls, insulters and hotheads, are the subject of Muriel Solomon's street-smart book. In it, the self-dubbed "strategic talking" expert categorizes many types of difficult people you might encounter at work. To make the book very applicable, she introduces each personality, explains why such individuals think as they do, how you are likely to react to their behavior, and what strategies you can use to protect yourself. Unless you work alone, getAbstract expects that you, like most team players, probably have your hands full dealing with a complete chorus of "false hounds" and "rascally knaves." This book can help you minimize their damage. Since you can't always get away from such people, you might as well learn how to put them in their place diplomatically. Or, if that doesn't work, you can quote Shakespeare: "I do desire we may be better strangers." Forsooth.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Guide, October 13, 2013
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This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
Although most of the information in this book you should have learned from your parents, many of us did not and it still is in my library for a reference today.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Characteristics, September 18, 2013
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This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
This book had everything explicitly stated and made the definitions of these people easy to remember. Definitely would recommend it.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Learn the art of Communicating., September 16, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
Well, Well, I find this book 'terrific' to say the least.
The arrangement of text(especially 'capitals') is simply wonderful. I learnt more and educated myself in the process. It was more like reading a novel. I would highly recommend you to read this book, but keep it away from the sight of 'Co-workers/Boss(for your own good!). I wish I could have a video of this book, I mean it would definitely help. Words once uttered, cannot be taken back, so it is better to polish it so that it conveys the intended meaning and gets the appropriate results when dealing with not only 'Difficult people' but everybody.
After some time, you will enjoy working with 'Difficult people', because they are usually the ones who have talents that have been overlooked. Take heart.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Working with difficult people, January 15, 2006
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This review is from: Working With Difficult People (Paperback)
Found the book difficult to follow and read. The book reads more like a dictionary.
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Working With Difficult People
Working With Difficult People by Muriel Solomon (Paperback - March 1, 2002)
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