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Working Relationships: Spirituality in Human Service and Organisational Life (Practical Theology Series) Paperback – April 15, 2004


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Working Relationships: Spirituality in Human Service and Organisational Life (Practical Theology Series) + Spirituality and Social Care: Contributing to Personal and Community Well-Being + The World of Children (3rd Edition)
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Product Details

  • Series: Practical Theology Series
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Pub; 1 edition (April 15, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843102528
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843102526
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,961,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In this illuminating and thoughtful text, Neil Pembroke shows how relationships form the heart of chaplaincy, nursing and social care practice. Developing ideas from Martin Buber and virtue theory he shows how authentic, compassionate self-communication forms the basis of relatedness in human services work.Drawing on examples from everyday life and human services work settings, Pembroke demonstrates the importance of trust and feelings of belonging in the working environment. He considers in particular the connection between spirituality and the idea of personal charm, showing how charm can be seen as a vital component in the communication of self, which enables us to nurture the physical and spiritual well-being of those we care for.

'The author demonstrates a clear understanding of the human elements that contribute to a happy, committed, successful organisation. It would make useful reading for anyone wishing to understand how to motivate and manage others in a way that promotes self - worth and self-responsibility.' - British Journal of Psychodrama and Sociodrama'This text is scholarly and authoritative, yet easily accessible. I found the subject matter interesting and sometimes challenging, as the author explores a number of core concepts, some of which have not been covered in depth, at least in relation to health care, elsewhere to my knowledge.'- Accident and Emergency Nursing'Working Relationships contributes to a deeper understanding of the characteristics of "quality" in human service work, and managers and public policy makers in these fields would do well to reflect on what it means to provide a truly human service. The practical value of this book is that it highlights the significance not only of a moral imagination but of the obligation that flows from that to respond, once we allow ourselves to be open to realities that communicate themselves to us. Thus, it speaks to us all to move from the inertia that comes from self-absorption towards building a communal life, justice, compassion and a concern for the common good. We are reminded that social bonds are forged not only through cooperative activity in the workplace but also through collective action aimed at shaping good political institutions. The central ideas in this book are presented clearly and logically and make it a pleasure to read.'- Australian Theological Book Reviewer (ATBR)

About the Author

Neil Pembroke is a lecturer in religion and psychology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane. Prior to taking up his academic post, he worked for eight years in pastoral ministry. He is also the author of The Art of Listening: Dialogue, Shame and Pastoral Care.

More About the Author

Neil Pembroke is Associate Professor of Practical Theology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Neil was awarded his PhD from Edinburgh University. He is a member of the International Academic of Practical Theology. Neil serves on the editorial boards of Pastoral Psychology and Practical Theology. An ordained minister of the Uniting Church in Australia, Neil is the author of six books and more than 30 articles on pastoral theology. He coordinates Masters and Doctoral programs in practical theology at the University of Queensland.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lawrie Palmer on January 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a timely book for all who work in health care. Its dual concerns of providing holistic care for the patient AND a caring organization that supports each employee is very pertinent. Both issues need to be addressed, and Neil Pembroke has done this. In the current environment there is intense pressure to deliver services to increasing numbers of patients with often less resources being provided to meet those goals.

This book is especially relevant to palliative care where we seek to improve the quality of life of patients and their families and offer an integrated approach to their physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs. Staff often work very intensely to provide such care and face the risk of burnout or compassion fatigue. Many palliative care providers see their work as a vocation and the team providing an invaluable sense of community. In addition to our clinical skills we offer ourselves. The presence we bring may be all that we can provide to a dying person and their loved ones as we are privileged to share this journey. Organizational structures need to be life-giving to support such activity. How we live out our faith in such an environment is tremendously important. This book provides valuable insights and I have no hesitation in recommending it.

Dr. Lawrence Palmer, Senior Consultant, Southern Adelaide Palliative Services, South Australia
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JKP on January 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
In this illuminating and thoughtful text, Neil Pembroke shows how relationships form the heart of chaplaincy, nursing and social care practice. Developing ideas from Martin Buber and virtue theory he shows how authentic, compassionate self-communication forms the basis of relatedness in human services work.

Drawing on examples from everyday life and human services work settings, Pembroke demonstrates the importance of trust and feelings of belonging in the working environment. He considers in particular the connection between spirituality and the idea of personal charm, showing how charm can be seen as a vital component in the communication of self, which enables us to nurture the physical and spiritual well-being of those we care for.
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