World's End and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $5.14 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Book is used, fast shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

World's End (Age of Misrule, Book 1) Paperback – May 26, 2009


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Import
"Please retry"
$2.99
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.86
$0.92 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

World's End (Age of Misrule, Book 1) + Darkest Hour (Age of Misrule, Book 2) + Always Forever (Age of Misrule, Book 3)
Price for all three: $41.31

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 415 pages
  • Publisher: Pyr; No. 1 edition (May 26, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159102739X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591027393
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.9 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #502,583 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mark Chadbourn is the critically acclaimed author of the novels Underground, Nocturne, and Scissorman, as well as the nonfiction work Testimony. He has worked as a journalist for a number of British national newspapers, magazines, and television.

Visit Mark Chadbourn's Web site at www.markchadbourn.net

More About the Author

A two-time winner of the prestigious British Fantasy Award, Mark has published his epic, imaginative novels in many countries around the world. He grew up in the mining community of the English Midlands, and was the first person in his family to go to university. After studying Economic History at Leeds, he became a successful journalist, writing for several of the UK's renowned national newspapers as well as contributing to magazines and TV.

When his first short story won Fear magazine's Best New Author award, he was snapped up by an agent and subsequently published his first novel, Underground, a supernatural thriller set in the coalfields of his youth. Quitting journalism to become a full-time author, he has written stories which have transcended genre boundaries, but is perhaps best known in the fantasy field.

Mark has also forged a parallel career as a screenwriter with many hours of produced work for British television. He is a senior writer for BBC Drama, and is also developing new shows for the UK and US.

An expert on British folklore and mythology, he has held several varied and colourful jobs, including independent record company boss, band manager, production line worker, engineer's 'mate', and media consultant.

Having travelled extensively around the world, he has now settled in a rambling house in the middle of a forest not far from where he was born.

Customer Reviews

This book was different than most of the fantasy books I have read.
N. Taylor
Enjoyed this novel, found the characters believable and the story gripping at times.
Teresa Pietersen
Unfortunately, the story is dragged down by flat characters and limp dialogue.
J. Lore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By verity on October 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
I didn't expect to be as impressed with this book as I was. It has a subtle intensity in descriptions, never slows down enough to get boring, but also never made me impatient to keep reading. I enjoyed the balance of descriptions, conversations, and action. It was a joy to read a book by an author I had never heard of, yet who seems to be taking the business of writing fantasy books seriously to invest admirable amount of research. Even though by the end it was really obvious the most popular description throughout is that everything tends to be "mediaeval" and every door is "oaken" :) Overall, a highly enjoyable read for anybody interested in the ancient fantasy resurging into a modern world presented with respect for everyone involved. Or just any fantasy fans in general, really. Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Justin Blazier on October 11, 2010
Format: Paperback
Imagine yourself walking home late one evening after a couple hours relaxing at the pub. You hear an argument close by and you make in its direction to investigate. What you end up seeing is a man being murdered by a creature so hideous it makes you vomit then completely lose consciousness. That's exactly what happened to Jack "Church" Churchill and Ruth Gallagher in Mark Chadbourn's World's End. The horrific experience has been permanently etched into their subconscious and it has changed their lives forever. Together they embark on a journey to find items that could save mankind from complete destruction by sinister forces.

World's End is quintessential contemporary dark fantasy. The story setting is a mix of modern day society and various elements from mythology. It's quite obvious Chadbourn has done his homework, given how well he links all these mythological pieces in with modern theological and philosophical concepts. Chadbourn creates a unique, believable, and complex tapestry of myth and folklore for this world. He pulls this off extremely well and authors-to-be should take note, because it's this kind of detail in world building that writers often miss in their stories.

The characters in World's End are many. There are at least six main characters that all get equal time. I'm usually wary when books have too many central characters; someone usually gets left undeveloped. That is not the case in this book. Each character is given the right amount of attention to make you feel for each of them and their unique situations. They have all come from different backgrounds and have very different personalities, but they are forced to rely on each other in deep and personal ways. I grew to love and respect each character as the story progressed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John on July 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
Age of Misrule is a series that's a more frustrating read to get into than it is to stop. Simply and squarely put, the author forgoes writing amusing yet predictable fluff in favor of telling a story. To that effect, the story starts slowly; the characters start slowly; and the reader spends quite a while confused, then shocked, then let down, before finally catching into the meat of the tale.

Age of Misrule starts with strongly undeveloped characters; that is to say, it starts with realistic characters. A man, with not so strange imaginings, wondering if the world is so bland and stale as it seems, but hopelessly caught in the mundane. A career woman, focused on her job, on daily life, completely unprepared for strange disaster. These are not people prepared to face the ultimate evil; they react exactly as you'd expect.

To that end, yes, the characters are dismal. They are not Beowulf; they do not enter the epic with the will of the Gods behind them and the guaranteed effortless success of a heroic battle. They are mortal; they can be killed, they can be cut, they can be hurt, they can bleed. They are human; they're scared, they understand what they've got to do and they go into it without the illusion that somehow they're immortal and immune to hurt. They're a bunch of men and women, just like you and I, stuffed into an impossible scenario.

And just like you and I, they're shaped by it. If your choices were fight or die, you'd quickly learn to fight, even though you're a weak coward. You'd learn to rely on things you never believed in before. You would live through things, again and again, until you learned where to put your trust and how to do what you need to do.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By J. Lore on July 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
Being a fan of urban fantasy, and after reading all of the positive reviews on Amazon for this series, I was excited to read the first book in the series. As described, there's a great plot. All of the Celtic myths are returning to Earth, and technology is failing. A band of five are destined to take part in the upcoming battles. Unfortunately, the story is dragged down by flat characters and limp dialogue. Ultimately, the book was disappointing. I will not be reading the second and third book in the series, because although I'm interested to see how the author resolves the plot, I can't stand spending any more time with the characters.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rene Sears on May 4, 2009
Format: Paperback
World's End, by Mark Chadbourne, is the first book of the Age of Misrule trilogy, in which the old fairy tales are returning to Britain, bringing about the end of the Age of Reason.

In London, Jack Churchill and Ruth Gallagher witness a brutal murder that leaves them both unconscious and with no memory of the murderer. The come to realize that the perpetrator was unnatural, and that more instances of the supernatural are occurring all over Britain, along with intermittent failures of technology. The two of them leave London to look for answers. As they travel, they're pursued by the frightening Fomorii and their vile allies. They meet a few helpful people along the way and come to realize that they're two of five Brothers and Sisters of Dragons -- fated to stand against the horrors invading the world. Their task is to collect four items of great magical significance, hidden in ancient sites of power. Along the way, some beneficent creatures offer help, but of course, they're few and far between compared to the evil ones.

Chadbourne has clearly done a huge amount of research into Celtic mythology and Arthurian legend, weaving folklore into a secret history. The result is a layered, complex world invaded by gruesome terrors, but lit with occasional moments of awe and beauty. The protagonists, Church, Ruth, Laura, Shavi, and Veitch, are flawed people thrust into a position of responsibility, doing the best they can against overwhelming odds. Their acceptance of their situation builds at realistic pace, contrasting nicely to the descent of the world into supernatural terror and technological failure. The relationships between the five of them are shifting and not without tensions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?