Worm: The First Digital World War and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $7.25 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by TheEscapePlace
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Worm: The First Digital World War Hardcover – September 27, 2011


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.75
$4.97 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

Worm: The First Digital World War + Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It
Price for both: $30.66

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press; First Edition edition (September 27, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802119832
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802119834
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,095 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Worm is worth attention. Government officials up to and including President Obama have taken notice of Conficker and begun to address some of the issues it raised.”—Bloomberg

“When Mark Bowden writes, smart readers pay attention. . . . Bowden is a deserved brand name – a superb reporter and compelling narrative writer, whether his subject is war in a forlorn land (Black Hawk Down, set in Somalia) or a variety of others in seven other books (Killing Pablo, Guests of the Ayatollah, etc.). And now we have the current masterpiece, Worm.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer

“The author takes readers behind the scenes, showing the security specialists’ increasing frenzy, not to mention occasional infighting, as they worked to defeat the worm. Along the way, the author lucidly explains how malware can take over computers as well as how the very openness of the Internet makes it vulnerable to attack.”—Publishers Weekly

“From the author of Black Hawk Down, a different sort of blood-and-thunder heroism narrative, out on the frontiers of cybercrime. . . . A brief, punchy reminder of our high-tech vulnerabilities.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Bowden . . . gives this account of the computer world’s efforts to neutralize the Conficker worm the flavor of a riveting report from the digital battlefield’s front lines. . . . A nerve-wracking but first-rate inside peek into the world of cybercrime and its vigilant adversaries.”—Booklist

“[T]he thumbs of every 30-something üntergeek will still Tweet in ecstasy at seeing technical terms like NCP/IP, Port 445, and MS08-067 spread across the pages of a mainstream book. But the rest of us should take Mark Bowden’s warnings with the utmost seriousness because of the growing threats to our wired world.”—New York Journal of Books

About the Author

Mark Bowden is the author of seven books, including Black Hawk Down, The Best Game Ever, Killing Pablo, and Guests of the Ayatollah. He reported at The Philadelphia Inquirer for twenty years and now writes for Vanity Fair, The Atlantic, and other magazines. He lives in Oxford, Pennsylvania.

More About the Author

Mark Bowden is the bestselling author of Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, as well as The Best Game Ever, Bringing the Heat, Killing Pablo, and Guests of the Ayatollah. He reported at The Philadelphia Inquirer for twenty years and now writes for Vanity Fair, The Atlantic, and other magazines. He lives in Oxford, Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

The publisher should have saved the paper for a better read.
G. BLAIR
I've been a fan of Mark Bowden's since I was asked to investigate how he got parts of his story for Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw.
Robert David STEELE Vivas
The author also explains just enough of the technical aspects to make the story understandable, and he does an excellent job in his explanations.
Julie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

115 of 115 people found the following review helpful By Chris Lee Mullins on September 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
One of the greatest things about airport bookstores - they often ignore sale dates. I purchased Worm a few days ago without realizing it wasn't supposed to be released yet. Which is good, because it made that flight from Denver to Baltimore tolerable.

First things first. If you are a network newbie, you will be coddled by this book. You don't need to have your MCSE or CISSP to read "Worm". Bowden does a good job of breaking down salient data - what is TCPIP, what is RPC - and creating explanations that make sense. Don't know why Port 445 is so special? Wonder why Windows is so often the target of malware around the world? (the technical explanation, not the political answer) You will after reading this book. It won't win you any medals at the next Cisco shareholders meeting or net you a job in IT, but at least you'll know why Patch Tuesday is important and why malware isn't just a problem with code - it's a social engineering problem, too.

The next best thing about this book is how much it stresses that the Internet is still in it's adolescence. It's a hodgepodge of ancient protocols and new-fangled protocols shoehorned into communicating with one another, and that's a fragile animal. you'll wonder why it doesn't go down more often.

"Worm" is entertaining and informative. Personally, I think it's too short. You'll get a quick bio about a particular researcher, follow them through some problem solving and then, inexplicably, drop them entirely while picking up with another researcher. I think the personalities involved are as important as the science. But those quibbles are trivial.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mal Warwick on October 5, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's out there. Waiting. Chances are, you've never heard of it. Nobody knows who controls it, or why. No one knows what it will do. But its destructive capacity is terrifying.

Welcome to the world of cyberwar! And, no, this is NOT science fiction.

"It" is the Conficker Worm, an arcane name (an insider's joke) for the most powerful "malware" -- malicious software -- yet encountered on the Internet. First detected in November 2008, Conficker is a devilishly clever bit of programming that took advantage of a vulnerability in the Windows operating system. Microsoft immediately moved to "patch" the vulnerability, but therein lay the problem: Windows is the most-pirated software of all, so hundreds of milliions of computers were running versions of Windows without the patch -- all of them vulnerable to Conficker (and to hundreds of other malicious programs whose authors now knew how to embed their work in Windows).

Mark Bowden, the very capable author of Blackhawk Down, tells the story in Worm of a group that included many of the world's top computer security experts who privately came together early in 2009 to combat Conficker. At first, they were confined exclusively to the private sector, and their work was informal. Eventually, they managed to gain the attention of senior government officials and -- slowly, reluctantly -- obtain limited official support from the U.S. and Chinese governments. The group, known among themselves as the Conficker Cabal, even managed to get onto the White House agenda late in the game, as Conficker was upgraded once and then again - because the worm represented nothing less than an existential threat to the Internet itself.

I did say the potential was terrifying, didn't I?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on September 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Author Bowden does a great job of summarizing malware in general, and the Conficker worm in particular. He begins by explaining that there are three types of malware - Trojans, viruses, and worms. A Trojan is a piece of software that masquerades as one thing to get inside a computer, then attacking. A virus attacks its host computer after entering its operating system - it depends on the operator opening an e-mail attachment or clicking on a lilnk. A worm works like a virus, but doesn't attack once it enters - it's primarily designed to spread, then wait for instructions delivered later.

Some computer malware is intended to damage or destroy one's computer, and victims quickly realize the problem. A computer worm, by contrast, is a packet of computer code designed to infiltrate a computer without attracting attention and then scans for others to invade, spreading exponentially. The Conficker computer worm emerged in November, 2008 and infiltrated 1.5 million of the world's computers in the first month. By January, 2009 it had spread to at least 8 million computers, exploiting flaws in Microsoft Windows that it closed after entering. They constantly check with its unknown creaters at their unknown location for directions. Frustrated cyber-security experts at Microsoft, Symantec, SRI International, etc. have merged forces to try and defeat it - so far they've been unsuccessful. Bowden's 'Worm' tells how hackers, entrepreneurs, and computer security experts are trying to defend the Internet from Conficker - what the author calls 'the first digital world war.'

In the 'good old days,' infected computers slowed down because user commands had to compete with viral invaders for processing power. Computers would slow down, and programs would freeze.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews