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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Emotions to Advocacy wins EP Symbol of Excellence
It is the night before Jessica's first big IEP Team meeting and her parents are scrambling to find something - ANYTHING - that can help them prepare for the meeting. Try Wrightslaw. Sally's advocate is packing her briefcase as she heads out the door for the IEP Team meeting. She checks for her most critical resource. Wrightslaw. Susan, a school district attorney,...
Published on February 14, 2007 by Patricia Luker

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars good, book but for more practical help. . .
This book was good, however, most of the content was merely a restatement of the relevant laws. For a book that gives parents more practical strategies they can really use, a must read is How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child by Gary Mayerson.
Published on October 27, 2004 by azh111


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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Emotions to Advocacy wins EP Symbol of Excellence, February 14, 2007
By 
Patricia Luker (Royal Oak, Michigan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy: The Special Education Survival Guide (Paperback)
It is the night before Jessica's first big IEP Team meeting and her parents are scrambling to find something - ANYTHING - that can help them prepare for the meeting. Try Wrightslaw. Sally's advocate is packing her briefcase as she heads out the door for the IEP Team meeting. She checks for her most critical resource. Wrightslaw. Susan, a school district attorney, checks her bag before heading off to her next meeting. Yup. Wrightslaw. Is there no one who hasn't heard of Wrightslaw?

Actually, we are sure that many readers have not, so today we review two new books from Wrightslaw. Both are second editions of books Pam and Pete Wright first released several years ago. The Wrights have updated both books to reflect the 2004 changes to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act [IDEA] and its implementing regulations. We use both books in our regular course of business and highly recommend them to parents, educators, advocates, attorneys and anyone else who has a need for quick but comprehensive manuals on special education law.

Wrightslaw: Special Education Law, 2nd Edition [Wrightslaw] is a wonderful and ready resource for all who want to be able to find and then quote chapter and verse of IDEA law and regulations. The book includes the complete text of all four parts of IDEA as enacted in December, 2004. Wrightslaw also contains the complete implementing regulations for IDEA that became effective in August, 2006. These texts alone are worth the cost of the book.

But Wrightslaw does not stop with the IDEA statute and its implementing regulations. Wrightslaw also includes the complete text of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act [FERPA]; the text to Section 504 [the Rehabilitation Act of 1973]; and the text of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. These inclusions ensure that the Wrightslaw user always has the key educational laws right at her fingertips at a moment's need. We have cited our Wrightslaw at IEP Team meetings, due process hearings, client meetings and the like.

Pam and Pete Wright make Wrightslaw even more valuable by including commentary on how to apply the included laws to typical special education circumstances. They talk about the No Child Left Behind Act and show how it fits into the special education law scheme. They cite and include the text of the major court cases that have shaped how special education law should be interpreted and implemented. And they have included a glossary of special education terms and acronyms with a user-friendly index.

We regard Wrightslaw as an essential resource in our practice. We believe the book should be part of every parent's [and educator's, advocate's, attorney's] special education library because of its rich and vital contents.

We also heartily recommend Pam and Pete's second book, Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy, 2nd Edition. The Wrights call this book "The Special Education Survival Guide." And well it is. The Wrights designed this book primarily for parents who need a one-stop how-to resource that will teach them to be strong and effective advocates for their children.

We cannot say enough about the contents and organization of this book. The Wrights have divided it into five sections. Section One helps parents to organize their thoughts and ideas, creating a mindset for them in their undertaking as advocates for their child. Section Two highlights the practice of advocacy, outlines the players, identifies common traps and provides strategies for resolving conflicts and managing crises. Section Three gives parents nuts and bolts information needed to make parents experts on all facets of their child's education; from file organization to testing to writing strong IEP's. Section Four walks parents through the broad principles found in IDEA's major provisions, touching on Section 504 and the No Child Left Behind Act. Finally, Section Five shows the now-well prepared parent how to advocate in the trenches: at the IEP Team meeting, collecting and documenting information; and managing and winning disputes.

We like From Emotions to Advocacy because it is loaded with sage advice that most parents will find easy to understand and apply. We especially like that the Wrights pull no punches in telling parents what they are in for as their child's advocates. Their "Rules of Adverse Assumptions," discussed in Chapter 21, are particularly powerful and to the point - don't expect others, especially educators, to see things your way. Plan and prepare to win your case on your own, using your own wits and resources. They then show you how.

Through Wrightslaw and From Emotions to Advocacy Pete and Pam Wright have provided a great service to parents, educators, advocates and attorneys, providing them with hands-on resources that pack power to the punch. We proudly award both books the EP Symbol of Excellence
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a Precious Resource For Child advocates, March 7, 2002
The games you must play, the rules you must learn, the complex and confusing mazes you must navigate to get help for your child match the mythic mazes of antiquity, where people would wander, lost and hopeless until they died.
The Wrights have created a book that, almost like magic, dispels the mists, casts bright shining light upon the dark recesses of the bureaucratic blockades the average parent, coach or advocate will find when trying to get help for a child.
This is a superb book for parents. It helps them understand the laws, actually putting into print the actual legal verbiage, then interpreting it into plain English.
Then they give you great advice on how to prepare for, go into and negotiate in meeting where your child's needs are being discussed.
... I bring together hundreds of health care practitioners who work with children with ADD, learning disabilities, neurobehavioral, developmental, sensory, medical and emotional disorders. It's always a pleasure to discover a valuable resource to share with colleagues and this is one of them. It deserves a space on the bookshelf of any counselor, psychologist, educator or other provider who advocates for children.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE HELP WE PARENTS NEED!, May 20, 2002
By 
Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy, The Special Education Survival Guide is a must have for ALL parents with a child in the special education system.
FETA helps to organize your thoughts, concerns and plan for your childs education. It gives you the ability to understand where the schools are coming from and how to build an effective relationship with the Special Education team. By doing this, you can effeectively advocate for your child. As the parent,you should be the "Project Manager" for your child as he/she makes her way through school. Through FETA you gain an understanding of HOW to do this. Special education systems and laws can at best be confusing and overwhelming, we parents need help in sorting it all out and FETA does that! We the parents of children in special education need to be equal players in the planning for our kids, NO ONE knows them like we do, and NO ONE will advocate for them like we will! FETA is an important tool in that process.
FETA also does a wonderful thing. It shows you how to organize all the mounds of paper that special education produces. I walk into meetings and seminars with everything I need at my fingertips.
FETA does someting else amazing, it helps you to understand the TESTING SCORES! Yikes, we all need help with that!
I can go on forever about this book, but I am running out of room. From special education laws, IEP's, resources, how to write effective letters, it its ALL in there! GET THIS BOOK!!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ATTENTION: ALL PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH LEARING DISABILITIES, March 17, 2004
By A Customer
If you have a learning disabled child, this book will become your Bible. It is an excellent resource book and it has helped me tremendously in the IEP process. My son is in the seventh grade now. I wished I had purchased this book earlier. I suggest that anyone who is going through an IEP for the first time to buy this book. There is alot of information that is not provided by the school. Alot of parents accept what the school says without question. I suggest purchasing The Complete IEP Guide: How to Advocate for Your Special Ed Child as well. These two books will enable you to become more educated in the difficult journey through special education politics. It will guide you, offer suggestions and ultimately you will feel more confident as you approach the school department to get an appropriate education for your child. Along with these books, I highly recommend getting an educational advocate. They know the laws and they can interpret the test results that seem like they are written in a foreign language. To all parents with sped kids...good luck and I wish you and your child the best!!!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Emotions to Advocacy, March 27, 2007
By 
Joan (Long Island) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy: The Special Education Survival Guide (Paperback)
I've been involved in advocating for my special needs son for 14 years and this is the BEST book I've ever read on the subject. A real "how-to." I just walked away from an IEP meeting with MORE than I asked for and it all happened in less than an hour. I was SO prepared. In particular, the chapter on the Rule of Adverse Assumptions helped me prepare. Thanks to this book, I had the confidence and the information that allowed me to effectively go to bat for our son. I'm using FETA in a parent training class I'm conducting now and it's SO helpful. From Emotions to Advocacy is a real treasure and should be the bible for every parent of a special needs child.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent 2nd edition!, December 20, 2005
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This review is from: Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy: The Special Education Survival Guide (Paperback)
I wrote a review for the first edition and this edition just gets better. It includes IDEA 2004. So not only will you learn how to create call logs and master lists you learn the MOST CURRENT law. IDEA goes into effect July 1,2005 and this is an AWESOME book for anyone who is new to the special education maze, but also is an EXCELLENT resource for those that have been in the system for awhile. I've learned to write letters that have been recognized and not filed under a pile, I've learned to keep a complete call log that has helped me when trying to obtain services for my son, and I've learned to understand the many complexities that come with the special education system.

I have MANY, MANY special education books, but this is this is the book I return to over and over again. I reccomend getting the Wrights Law Book and the Wrights Law IDEA 2004 to go with this. This book does reference some of the special ed law and it is great to be able to flip to the specific paragraph in the law book to help fully understand what Emotions touches on.

An awesome book!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The perfect complement to their first Book, January 28, 2002
By 
Stephen Metz (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
Six years ago, well after our son was illegaly expelled from his high school, I became an advocate for parents of children with disabilities. Over the years I have gained some national recognition for my work. But It wasn't until I found Pete and Pamela's Wright's first book "Wrightslaw", that I had one single place to learn what a parent needs to understand and secure their child's "legal rights". Their books are written in plain English and not legalese which for someone with learning disabilities, as I am, made my life easy. Now the Wright's have added what is the perfect complement to their first book called, "From Emotions to Advocacy". I know, first hand, how badly I personally performed when we found out our child had two disorders and was going to be tested by our school. Our child's school did everything they could to not provide our child with the mandated help found within IDEA and the Americans with Disabilities Act. What Pete and Pamela have done in this book, is provide "All" the answers to the hundreds of questions a parent of a child with disabilities have when entering the world of Special Education. For instance, what do those special education tests scores the school gives you mean? Or, when they tell you your child is not entitled to help because your child is passing their grades, Pete and Pam tell you why that may not be accurate or legal. It not only gives you the answers to your questions, it gives you questions to ask of your child's educators that force them to be honorable. They tell you how to write a letter to teachers, and administrators, that get results, not using anger which is most parents' biggest mistake when dealing with antagonistic schools. It is a soup to nuts book covering every base of information needed to be your child's best advocate. I write a monthly column that is read by hundreds of people on various web sites. The greatest complement, I can give to any author, is when I'm personally asked by the parents I help, what they should read, my advice is buy the two books by Pam and Pete Wright ("Wrightslaw: Special Education Law" and their new book "From Emotions to Advocacy").
One gives you the legal information you need to make sure your school follows the law, and their new Book, from "Emotions to Advocacy" teaches you how to deal effectively with the school after you get them to follow the law. Bottom line, My advice is rather simple, If you are to buy any books about the World of Special Education and securing the help your child needs and is entitled to under law, then these two books are all you will ever need. They are the end all be all of Special Education help books. From Emotions to Advocacy frees us, from the pain of not knowing what to do to help our kids in dealing with Special Education issues. These books are a "MUST BUY"
Steve Metz
teacher007@aol.com
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Help at it's best!!!!, March 18, 2002
By 
Rebecca Smith (Canton, OH United States) - See all my reviews
I attended the Cleveland, OH seminar in Feb, and was so glad that I did. Not only was the information, shared by Pam and Pete Wright, invaluable, but I was able to obtain their books, "Wrightslaw" and "From Emotions to Advocacy." Any parent who has a child with special needs, knows how difficult it can be, to get needed services, as well as have them implimented correctly. My youngest child is autistic, and he has been having a very difficult time during the current school year. Despite numerous attempts to resolve the problems, I was getting no where, on my own. As a last resort, I retained an attorney. Things were now beginning to move in a positive direction, and then I attended the seminar. Between the information shared at the seminar, and the information in the books, I now feel that I have a better understanding of the "do's, dont's, rights,and wrongs" that can and do occur with parents and school administrators. I immediately implimented some of the suggestions given in the books and at the seminar, with very positive results. One suggestion was to bring food to the meetings, something I have done for several years. I have yet to have someone tell me, "No thank you, I'm not hungry." Another suggestion was to be very organized. I purchased an expandable file folder, which holds all of my son's IEP's, MFE's, and any other correspondence, in chronological order. At my last meeting, on Mar. 5, a question arose, concerning past reports. I was able to pull out the needed report, quickly, while everyone else just sat there. The comment from the Special Ed Director was, "Look at this. Boy is she organized." No one, with a special needs child, should be without either one of these books.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You will not regret this purchase-please buy it!, April 25, 2003
By 
If you have a child with a disability,I cannot emphasize enough the importance of having this book. I happen to have two children with different disabilities. It does not matter what disability your child has, this book will help you. I wish I had it sooner. This book shows you how to write good letters to school personnel, an easy way to organize your childs files and the importance of doing this, how to measure testing to see if your child is progressing and how to use that information to help your child and the creation of the Ed Plan, how to prepare for an IEP meeting and participate using the right skills to get what is best for your child and so much more. Before I read this book I never thought I would have been able to get the services and modifications I wanted with such ease and success. By employing the strategies in this book I have found the school really listens to what I have to say and considers it. What a nice change from years past! Don't get me wrong you have to prepare, but this book shows you how. If you follow the advice in this book, it makes it very difficult for the school system to refuse you (if your requests are legitamate).
Don't be intimidated as I was, thinking: "I will never understand the information in this type of book." The authors write this in very easy to understand language. They actually make the laws interesting to learn and easy to remember. If only I had this book at the beginning of my Special Education journey? My wish is that you do!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the first book parents must purchase!, November 30, 2001
By 
Patricia L. Howey (Advocate from West Point, IN United States) - See all my reviews
This is the book that parents of special needs children have been searching for!
When a child does not "fit in the box", parents find that they must search for information on how to care for their child. Just when they have mastered the medical maze, the child begins school and the search for advice and knowledge begins all over again!
Children with disabilities who succeed in school have parents who learn to set aside their feelings and clothe themselves in the armor of advocacy. "From Emotions to Advocacy" assists parents in the journey through the special education labyrinth by giving them a focus. Parents learn accurate documentation and record-keeping, productive communication skills, effective tactics and strategies, and Pete and Pam Wright have put it all together into an easy to read, understandable package.
Parents who use the process and procedures outlined in "From Emotions to Advocacy" will avoid many of the pitfalls that entrap many parents of special needs children. I wish this book had been available in 1986, not only for my own use, but so that the hundreds of parents I have worked with since then could have benefited from it. If you are the parent or if you know of a parent of a special needs child, do yourself or them a favor. Buy yourself or them this book!
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Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy: The Special Education Survival Guide
Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy: The Special Education Survival Guide by Peter W.D. Wright and Pamela Darr Wright (Paperback - January 1, 2006)
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