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A Wrinkle in Time (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet Book 1) Kindle Edition

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Length: 228 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Everyone in town thinks Meg is volatile and dull-witted and that her younger brother Charles Wallace is dumb. People are also saying that their father has run off and left their brilliant scientist mother. Spurred on by these rumors, Meg and Charles Wallace, along with their new friend Calvin, embark on a perilous quest through space to find their father. In doing so they must travel behind the shadow of an evil power that is darkening the cosmos, one planet at a time.

Young people who have trouble finding their place in the world will connect with the "misfit" characters in this provocative story. This is no superhero tale, nor is it science fiction, although it shares elements of both. The travelers must rely on their individual and collective strengths, delving deep into their characters to find answers.

A classic since 1962, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time is sophisticated in concept yet warm in tone, with mystery and love coursing through its pages. Meg's shattering yet ultimately freeing discovery that her father is not omnipotent provides a satisfying coming-of-age element. Readers will feel a sense of power as they travel with these three children, challenging concepts of time, space, and the power of good over evil. (Ages 9 to 12)

Review

"Two children, accompanied by an older boy, go on a search for their missing scientist-father-a dangerous search that takes them through space by means of a 'tesseract,' or wrinkle in time, to the dark planet Camazotz, whose puppetlike inhabitants are controlled by IT, a disembodied brain."-Booklist
-- Review

Juvenile novel by Madeleine L'engle, published in 1962. It won a Newbery Medal in 1963. Combining theology, fantasy, and science, it is the story of travel through space and time to battle a cosmic evil. With their neighbor Calvin O'Keefe, young Meg Murry and her brother Charles Wallace embark on a cosmic journey to find their lost father, a scientist studying time travel. Assisted by three eccentric women--Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who, and Mrs. Which--the children travel to the planet Camazotz where they encounter a repressed society controlled by IT, a disembodied brain that represents evil. Among the themes of the work are the dangers of unthinking conformity and scientific irresponsibility and the saving power of love. The sequels are A Wind in the Door (1973), A Swiftly Tilting Planet (1978), and Many Waters (1986). -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

Product Details

  • File Size: 390 KB
  • Print Length: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (April 1, 2010)
  • Publication Date: April 1, 2010
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004OA64H0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,988 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Madeleine L'Engle, the popular author of many books for children and adults, has interspersed her writing and teaching career with raising three children, maintaining an apartment in New York and a farmhouse of charming confusion which is called "Crosswicks."

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

268 of 285 people found the following review helpful By E.H. on July 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
Meg Murray was one of my best friends growing up. She was imperfect, and loving, and confused, and wickedly smart, and astonishingly dense, and absolutely could not see the beauty of herself (both inside and outside). As a young girl who was also struggling with these things, I found solace and comfort in immersing myself into books where in "the real world" the same types of issues occurred, but that there were "greater" things going on, that she was so uniquely qualified to work on.

While it is true that the book can be read allegorically, it is a treasure all unto itself. I have many geeky, male friends who enjoyed this book as a child, but it did not resonate with them like it did with the woman I have spoken to. I think this is a book wonderful for all genders and ages, but especially lovely for young girls who are a little smarter than the rest of their class, who feel a little less attractive, and who are just finding it difficult to traverse their world.

Many years later, I still find myself reading or listening to this book at least once every year. When things in life start to get a little crazy, and all of those same feelings come back (only now it is being a little too smart at work, and being a little less socially skilled at networking, etc), I visit my friend Meg, and between the two of us things always seem clearer by the end of the book. :)

It is worth noting that there are 3 other books in this "series". A Wrinkle in Time is the first one, then "A Wind in the Door" (A Wind in the Door), "A Swiftly Tilting Planet" (
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226 of 241 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a children's book, but it isn't just an adventure story.

It has science-fiction; The Drs. Murray, parents of Meg, Charles Wallace and the twins) are scientists who are researching Time and Space. Dr. Murray takes a time trip and so do the kids.
There is also magic; a trio of "witches" shows up--Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which, and they take Meg, her brother Charles-Wallace, and their new friend Calvin on an epic adventure.
It's also the story of a family with a deep trouble who nonetheless stay together, the story of a young girl who is just coming into adolescence with all the awkwardness and confusing feelings, and the story of a special little boy who is thought to be retarded by townspeople.

The symbology L'Engel uses is powerful and original; a giant brain who seduces those around it into surrendering their free will as an ultimate dictator; a shadow-like smog around planets that represents the presence of Evil, and a special young boy who is more than a genius; who is "something new" who nonetheless can be tempted to his own destruction by vanity.
Wrinkle in Time has a lot of fertile subjects for discussions between parents and children about good, evil, how we treat each other, and the choices we make. Ms. L'Engel often uses moral themes in her books and this one contains excellent subjects for discussions about kindness, good, evil, God, and being different, and about the destructiveness of gossip.

Wrinke in Time is like the Potter books in that it is about boys and girls in a magical or fantasy setting. It is unlike the Potter books because it does not focus on wizardry as a craft. Instead it presents the universe as full of wonder, and united by a titanic struggle of Good against Evil. Like the Potter books, there are sequels to Wrinkle in Time, and the story of the Murray kids continues. This was hands-down my favorite book as a child. I still have my copy almost 40 years later.
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228 of 247 people found the following review helpful By Loran on May 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this book in about the 7th grade which was around four years ago. I loved this book when i read it. It combines fantasy and amazing writing into one book. I loved how Meg went to save her brother and father. This book is really truly amazing. When I review a book on amazon that i love, i like to look at the one star review and read why people did not like that certain book. I did the same with this book and learned that a lot of kids under the age of 13 were reading this book, and not enjoying it. They either said that they didn't understand it, and therefore it was boring, or that people can really tesser to another planet. If you do not understand a book, then you should put it down and read it a few years later. Those who stated that no one can really tesser to another planet or place are right, you can't, but this story is fiction, meaning it is not real.

thank you for your time
and i sincerely hope that
you read this book,
Loran
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317 of 358 people found the following review helpful By Orrin C. Judd VINE VOICE on November 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The phenomenal success of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter books (see Orrin's review)--the first two are currently both in the Top 10 of most Bestseller Lists--lead me to reread this Children's Classic, which was one of the big favorites of our generation. I must have read it around fifth grade--I imagine most every kid in America reads it at some point--and no one will be surprised to hear, it turns out I wasn't as smart as I thought I was when I was ten. Madeleine L'Engle managed to hoodwink me, but good. I thought this was just a great Science Fiction/Fantasy story, but now I discover that the whole book is a religious allegory.
Meg Murry and her brothers, Charles Wallace and the twins, live with their mother. Their Father has been missing for years, supposedly working on a top secret government project. Meg and Charles Wallace are strange children, noone seems to know quite whether they are idiots or geniuses. In short order they meet Calvin, a tall gangly boy, who also feels like a misfit and three women who have moved into an abandoned house in the neighborhood. The old women, Mrs. Whatsit , Mrs. Which & Mrs. Who, inform the children that Mr. Murry is in dire straits and needs their help. They travel through time and space via wrinkles, called tesseracts, to the planet Camazotz, where Mr. Murry has gone to battle the forces of darkness that are closing sections of the universe in shadow. There they battle the evil being known as IT, a disembodied brain who offers people complete security if they will only give up their freedom and their individuality, as have the inhabitants of Camazotz.
Most of the allegorical stuff is easy enough to see, the children can fight evil by finding The Father.
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