Buy Used
$1.68
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by bookbazaars
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good having possibility of underlined, highlighted sentences. Textbooks may not include their supplements like CD, access code, info track, etc. Fast shipping.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Wrinkle in Time (text only) by M. L'Engle Paperback – 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 2007
$4.26 $1.68
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Square Fish (2007)
  • ASIN: B004RGSDCA
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 3.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #759,503 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By readlikebreathing on August 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
Honestly, I have no idea how I read this book as a child and understood it more than I do now. Maybe it's just because my adult brain is trying too hard to understand the physics behind the tesseract and the 5th dimension, but I kept feeling lost. I distinctly remember as an 8 year old reading this book and just being like... Oh right I completely get it. The child mind is fascinating.

That being said, there's a reason this book won three separate honors. It combines fantasy (mystical creatures) with terrifying science-fiction in a way that children can understand. Everyone being the same, very reminscient of invasion of the body snatchers, which shows the importance of individuality, aliens that seem frightening but really aren't (because appearances can be deceiving), the fight against the unknown, unnamed evil of the world. These are all lessons children have to learn, told through the medium of science-fiction.

But again, it's science fiction kids can understand. How they do, I have no idea. But they definitely do.

I think it's worth noting that Meg is one of my favorite female characters ever written, because (as is said by one of their guides) her FLAWS make her special and powerful. It's because she's stubborn, impatient, argumentative, and yet so loving that she's able to save her brother and father. When I was younger, Meg accepting herself helped me to love all my oddities (loving astronomy, reading more than talking, looking different than everyone else).

This is the main reason I hate that paranormal romance has become such a big deal; there aren't characters like Meg anymore. SMART girls, girls who are so smart people can't see them as pretty or even likeable (unlike Hermione).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By KBPaulie on February 21, 2013
Format: Paperback
A Kid's Review: Meg and her little brother, Charles Wallace travel to other planets. Charles loses his mind to "IT" - a giant brain. It's up to Meg and her friend Calvin to rescue Charles and her father.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Larry Benjamin on November 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
I've heard it said that there are two kinds of kids - the ones who read and loved "A Wrinkle in Time," and those who didn't. I was definitely in the first category. I was heavily into science fiction as a teenager, idolizing Asimov, Heinlein, and subscribing to "Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine" from the first issue. But "A Wrinkle in Time" was very different, focusing much more on the characters and their relationships over the "science." Many important plot points are left unexplained - there's a short demonstration of how spacetime is "bent" to allow instantaneous travel over long distances, but nothing on the exact mechanism, which seems to be purely a function of the traveler's will. Also left unexplained is how Mr. Murry survives for years in the cylindrical chamber where the children find him, or how "IT" survives as a disembodied brain.

The main theme of the book is how "not fitting in" is a virtue; each of the main characters, Meg, Calvin, and Charles Wallace, "don't fit in" in their own unique ways. On Camazotz, in contrast, everyone must fit into society perfectly, down to their very movement in concert with a steady, rhythmic beat emanating from "IT." I missed the parallel with Communism here, where everyone must fulfill their predetermined role in society, with no deviation tolerated. The great virtue of America, it would seem, is our tolerance of nonconformity and our making a place for those with unique skills.

I missed, or at least didn't object to the barely-concealed religious subtext - "IT," of course, is Satan, who completely controls "lost" Camazotz, is engaged in a fierce battle to control earth, and is opposed by great leaders and teachers, foremost among them "Jesus, of course, Jesus!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bmuse on October 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover
My childhood pigeonhole was "library geek," I was never deeply into one or another subject (unless it was fairy tales and myths) but read my way through books the way bees go through blossoms, pretty much. The librarian would not shut up about "A Wrinkle in Time," recommending it to students and their parents and teachers. That was how I first encountered Madeleine L'Engle, and 'A Wrinkle in Time" was the first title of hers which I read.

The human families of the Murrys, in this series, and the Austins in another L'Engle series, are the constants; the extra-terrestial characters rarely appear more than once. Little Charles Wallace, who loses his way in the most suspenseful part of "A Wrinkle In Time," takes three books, starting with this one, to play the part he is destined to play in childhood and teenage adolescence. After three books, the family dynamics change, and Charles Wallace does not appear in the rest of the Murry Family stories -- presumably he is having a fulfilling life as an adult below the radar somewhere.

I think the factor that makes "A Wrinkle In Time" appeal to the widest possible readership, particularly those readers who love this one book but balk at any or all of the sequels, is the unique contribution of Mrs Whatsit, Mrs Who, and Mrs Which together. After they take their leave of the humans, at the book's very end, they get carried off -- in mid-sentence! -- and we never hear from them again. These three extra-terrestial entities (reincarnated spirits of stars?) personify a benevolent Creator through the medium of the "Great Great Grandmother" archetype introduced a century earlier in George MacDonald's stories about Curdie, his Princess, and their families.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews