Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Writing Great Characters : The Psychology of Character Development in Screenplays Paperback – January 25, 1996


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.34 $3.13



Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Visualize Your Script: Hey screenwriters, check out Amazon Storyteller, a new (and free) tool from Amazon Studios that turns scripts into storyboards. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Lone Eagle Publishing Company (January 25, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0943728797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0943728797
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,075,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael Halperin escaped New Jersey and came west with his parents while battling his brother all the way to Los Angeles. His early success selling a short story to a magazine when he was fifteen put him on the road as a writer. Little did he know it wasn't always going to be that easy. Once out of college he became a documentary filmmaker and then entered the world of television. His scripts caught the eye of a TV producer and he became a Story Editor for Universal Television and then Executive Story Consultant at 20th Century-Fox. He wrote numerous episodes for long-running television series and created a popular animated series, "He-Man and the Masters of the Universe". His novels include the Young Adult book "Black Wheels", chosen by the National Education Assn. for its prestigious African American Booklist 2005 through 2012 and the best-selling award-winning novel for children "Jacob's Rescue: A Holocaust Story", Random House. Non-fiction: "Writing Great Characters", Lone Eagle; "Writing the Second Act", MWP; and "Writing the Killer Treatment", MWP. Halperin edited the anthology "Judaism: Embracing the Seeker", KTAV Publishing, 2010. Celebrity Staged Reading Series debuted Halperin's comedy "Driving James Dean", 2011; "Freedom, Texas" JAC Publications, Celebrity Staged Reading Series in October 2009 in Los Angeles. His one-character play, "Mela", was performed as a staged reading in Santa Monica, 2009 and in August 2004 in Jerusalem commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Yad Vashem. "The Spark of Reason" (Dorothy Silver Playwriting Finalist), JAC Publications, had a series of staged readings at the Promenade Playhouse, Santa Monica, California in 2008. "Dancing With William Blake" was chosen by the Eileen Heckert Playwriting Competition for inclusion in the Lawrence and Lee Archives of the Ohio State University Libraries and was finalist in the Michigan Writers Program. "All Steps Necessary", commissioned and produced by Inkwell Theater, premiered April 2006 in Los Angeles. "Freud at Sinai" and "Poor Timing", one-act plays, have been produced on both the east and west coasts. His newest play commission is "Hidden Wisdom", four one-act plays adapted from short stories. Halperin lectured on writing, broadcasting and communications in the School of Film and Television at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. He has a BA Degree in Communications from the University of Southern California Annenberg School of Communications and a Ph.D. in Film Studies.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 5, 1997
Format: Paperback
With all the screenwriting books on format and career success on the market it seems odd that there are only a handful of books devoted to the most important element of any good story--the CHARACTERS. Halperin's book is a welcome text on the subject, but it lacks the depth of Linda Seger's "Creating Unforgettable Characters. The chapters touch on essential elements found in successful stories such as myth, culture, and interior lives, but the examples and in-depth analysis are minimul. Many exercise questions at the end of each chapter fail to get the mind to develop the skills and ideas presented previously. The final chapter details what the author considers great characters from Citizen Kane to Forrest Gump, but I would have preferred more intense study of these characters within the subjects of each chapter.
While I like this book for its contribution to a little written about subject I finished it feeling a bit shortchanged.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
You might find this book interesting if you've never read another book on screenwriting or human behavior. If you've read any of the other books in the field you will find this one inferior. Linda Seger's books on characterization are much better. I'm only glad I bought this title used from Amazon.com -- and I waited to sell it before I posted this review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
As an aspiring screenwriter, I have devoured most of the commonly read texts currently available on the topic. Halperin's book does _not_ stand up favorably. In fact, not only is his writing style stilted and vague (e.g., non-specific use of "it" and "they", and more dumped quotes than you can shake your mouse at), his ideas are nothing more than lame banalities. For more info on writing pick up any of Syd Field's books, and for info on psychology any basic primer will do. His examples are not illustrative and his film analysis is at the middle-school level. Don't waste your money on this book like I did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 24, 1998
Format: Paperback
Well, I must say that =I= find Michael Halperin's book an essential screenwriting reference. Dr. Halperin was one of the best screenwriting instructors I had at USC's School of Cinema-Television, where he taught the future pros of the industry. His advanced screenwriting classes were some of the toughest in the school--and therefore the most worthwhile.
What's so good about Halperin's book? For one thing, he doesn't talk down to you as a screenwriter. In fact, he presumes that you know what you are doing. Imagine that! So he's not going to hold your hand through the elementary parts of introductory screenwriting. Try Syd Field for that. Instead, Halperin shows the already competent writer how to improve his or her script's ultimate impact by significantly improving characterization.
Although I may agree that script consultant Linda Seger's books are excellent and beneficial, it should be pointed out that she has never written a single screenplay in her life.! Dr. Halperin is a =working= writer in the film industry, and his book is a winner. Enough said.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search