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Writing the Killer Treatment: Selling Your Story Without a Script Paperback – July 30, 2003


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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Halperin is a professional writer and has worked extensively as a creativeand story consultant in the television industry.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions (July 30, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 094118840X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941188401
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,061,140 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Because he presumes you know something odds are you do not know.
Daniel A. Russo
Not much here to help novices and certainly not for anyone with the vaguest idea of how scripts "work." Very skimpy with examples.
Michael L. Goldberg
I bit the bullet and bought the book hoping to at last gain some insight into how I might improve.
chaztv

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
This one suffers the flaw common to how-to books on writing: it's short on models. Plenty of TALK about how to write a treatment, but most writers know that the best instruction comes from an assortment of professionally polished examples. If you want to be a journalist, read the NY Times. If you want to write killer treatments, read some killer treatments.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Michael L. Goldberg on September 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
Not much here to help novices and certainly not for anyone with the vaguest idea of how scripts "work." Very skimpy with examples. There's so much "nuts-and-bolts" knowledge that's necessary to create a good script or treatment, and this book provides little of it.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Derek Rydall on May 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
Writing a solid treatment is something rarely -- if ever -- taught in writing courses. This is a great disadvantage for screenwriters, because having the ability to write a compelling treatment could make the difference between getting your foot in the door -- or getting the door closed in your face.

At the very least, mastering this writing form can help writers flesh out their material and pitch it to prospective buyers BEFORE they write the script, allowing them to get feedback and make changes to a 10-15 page document versus a 100-120 page one.

There are few books on this very important topic, and Michael Halperin has written one that belongs in every writers library. If you don't understand what a treatment is for, how it is used, or how to create one, you will after reading this book.

And if you plan on writing for TV, this book is a must. With it's many examples of how to write treatments for TV -- episodic and long-form, it will cut your learning curve in half!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By chaztv on April 20, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title promises to instruct one on how-to write an exceptional script treatment. Yet, like most books of the Hollywood how-to genre, story elements are stressed. Though Mr. Halperin may or may not be "the foremost authority on screenwriting in America," one thing is for sure: you will not find one example of a "killer treatment" in this book. No, you won't even find one fraction of a decent treatment. The only example of the writing of this difficult to define style of storytelling sales document in the book begins: "Dark, threatening clouds loom over jagged snow-covered peaks casting ominous winter shadow on the river." A.K.A. the "It was a dark and stormy night..." opening gambit. I find treatments the most troubling and perplexing form of writing required in the motion picture business. For me, the last piece of the four major forms: log line, synopsis, treatment and script. The one form I have not yet come close to being able to execute with any aplomb. I bit the bullet and bought the book hoping to at last gain some insight into how I might improve. There's nothing in here you haven't read in other screenwriting how-to books, but even more egregious you won't even find a good treatment, or part of one, as an example and an inspiration.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jung on March 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
Before you start your next script, TV or feature, do not pass up this book.
Halperin really breaks down the most effective way a writer can create a solid,
professional treatment and even prepare the dreaded pitch. Through informative
examples and explanation, he gives aspiring and professional writers the tools
needed in achieving a solid story and characters before embarking on the next
step of the writing process.
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