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Writing Linux Device Drivers: a guide with exercises Paperback – September 3, 2009


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Writing Linux Device Drivers: a guide with exercises + Writing Linux Device Drivers: Lab Solutions: a guide with exercises + Linux Program Development: a guide with exercises
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 394 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 3, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1448672384
  • ISBN-13: 978-1448672387
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #418,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jerry Cooperstein has been working with computers since 1969. He has a PhD in theoretical nuclear astrophysics, and has been using Linux since 1994. He has done many Linux engineering projects both at the application and kernel level and since 1998 has been developing and teaching courses on Linux Device Drivers, Kernel Internals and Systems Programming.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By frank.sposaro on July 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was required for one of my Computer Science classes. It does a good job at introducing all the kernel parts, but doesn't go into great detail about any one. It's good for people that are just getting into kernel programming, but I got though the class by using Google and other references that are already out there.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Barth on August 10, 2010
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This book reads like a course outline used to teach a course. There are 35 chapters, most about 5 - 10 pages each. It begins by discussing driver issues, and devotes one long chapter (18 pages!) to character drivers. Then the book launches into virtually every kernel programming issue such as interrupts, timers, scheduling, ioctls, etc. Yes, these are useful topics for a device driver developer, but I have already seen most of these topics. The author seems to completely lose sight of the goal of this book: Writing Linux Device Drivers. Finally, in Chapter 24 the author gets back to device drivers and does provide 4 chapters on Network Drivers, and one on USB drivers. Block drivers aren't discussed until the very last chapter (9 pages including exercises).

This book can be useful as an outline, a guide to direct your online research (read, Google). But I very much doubt that anyone could write a meaningful device driver using just this book. If you have access to this book, use it as a study guide. But I wouldn't recommend buying it.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful By S. BIRCH on December 15, 2009
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Dr. Cooperstein,

I just wanted to thank you for your excellent book (and lab solutions manual/code) "Writing Linux Device Drivers." I'm in the process of writing multiple kernel modules as part of my thesis, and I've been having a pretty rough time trying to use existing examples or other research given the significant changes in kernel code. Most of the other books I've found either skirt around the issues that seem clearly presented in your book...or they explain them only as clearly as the source code itself.

Other books that do explain things well often present code that will not work with current linux kernels, and it is very tough for someone trying to learn the concepts to adapt obsolete source code...if I knew how to update the code, I wouldn't need to book in the first place. I think I can say this confidently, as I own just about every book about the linux kernel or linux kernel drivers from O'Reilly, Wrox, Novell, Prentice Hall, Addison Wesley, Osborne, and probably a couple I can't think of right now.

Your book is not only well written (and timely for me), but both its content and sample code are directly usable in current linux kernels. I greatly appreciate the simple fact that all the driver code compiles cleanly; that is truly a unique feature at this time...and one that means a lot to someone trying to figure it out. If the online source code continues to be kept to-date with current kernels, your books will be an enduring asset!

Thank you for publishing your books.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rob Wehrli on December 28, 2012
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I liked this book a lot. It seems that it could just as easily be a (somewhat informal) textbook in a classroom setting or a desk-side companion for a kernel driver hacker. The exercises are very much a part of what makes this book so fun. The writing style and content are a welcomed departure from the standard into-tech-slopping or disjointed glitzy spin noise associated with so many other books these days.

The content is very logically presented. It is straight-forward and solid. Every book has issues, but this one shines head and shoulders above the rest, IMO. While it naturally tends toward front-to-rear reading, it doesn't require it the way so many other books do. You can actually jump around rather free-spirited without the essential pre-reading dictated by those books that tell you in chapter one that what they just mentioned will be discussed later in chapter 8, but that [insert next 19 topics] won't be discussed until [add forward reference] because *then* something presented will start to make sense. What the heck?!

Seriously, this book is a great book for someone who knows C programming and isn't still looking for the 'any' key on the keyboard. It is very focused on the core information and details of writing Linux drivers as kernel drivers and loadable modules. The examples and the exercises are worth the price of admission, but you get a "right-length" engaging conversational road-trip with the author for free.

The cover art should tell you that this book is more about content and less about fluff, which is true. It is a pleasure to be able to recommend a book as fun to read as this one.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Anton Chikin on May 31, 2010
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It's a pity i have bought this book. It almost duplicates "Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition" book, which you can get for free from it's author's site. It proposes itself to mirror 2.6.31 kernel changes, but it is not so. Some topics a covered very bad. Read Linux Device Drivers first, and then look at this book - may be you'll find 1 or 2 usefull chapters here. 23$ stupidly lost.

I've also came across "Essential Linux Device Drivers" by Sreekrishnan Venkateswaran which I can recomend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sky on September 17, 2013
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good , faster ship , It's been a week since I got this product and this thing is super awesome.None. As much as I want to think of something bad to say, there's simply nothing negative about this.
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