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Written in Tears: A Grieving Father's Journey Through Psalm 103 Paperback – September 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Discovery House Publishers (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1572933828
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572933828
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #982,010 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book has something for everyone.  In its own way the book is a triumph of research and scholarship.  The book does a masterful job of chronicling the author's grief and recovery, and it can serve as a guide to anyone undergoing a similar experience.  Beyond that, the narrative thread in the book provides a captivating story for any reader.
--Leland Ryken, literary stylist for the English Standard Version of the Bible


Many of Luke's words could have been my own.  As I read the account of his daughter Allison's death, I relived my own experience in the death of our Stephenie. It is such a comfort to know, as Luke and Jodi experienced, that God's promises are true.  Luke's book is filled with reminders of God's faithfulness to His children.  It was a huge blessing to me and I believe that it will be an encouragement and comfort to others who have experienced a devastating loss.
--Ginny Saint, co-author with husband, Steve, of Walking His Trail

Luke Veldt strikes a down-to-earth, throughly honest, thoroughly biblical chord. There's no pretending that the loss of a teen-age daughter is anything but painful and, in the end, still mystifying.  Not given to pat answers or glib ways to recover, Veldt lodges his torment in Psalm 103, which keeps his book from being shallow and maudlin.  Movingly told, Veldt's story and his theology give solid guidance to the grieving.
--Jim Reapsome, author of 10 Minutes a Day with Jesus

This book has been on my mind and heart since I read the first page.
--Tim Challies, author of The Next Story


This book is every bit as sensitive and insightful as C.S. Lewis's A Grief Observed. However, it gives you the added enrichment of the author's record of his pilgrimage in Psalm 103 as he and his family walked through the valley together. I have read scores of books on comforting the bereaved, and this one is outstanding. If you are grieving or seeking to comfort someone who is, join the Veldt family and discover what God and His Word can do for the broken-hearted.  Every pastor and care-give must read this book! 
--Warren W. Wiersbe, author of Why Us? When Bad Things Happen to God's People

From the Back Cover

When Luke Veldts thirteen-year-old daughter Allison died suddenly, he started to ask questions about the things he had always assumed were true: Is the Bible trustworthy? Is there really a God? Is Allison with Him?

 And yet the first place he looked for answers to his questions and comfort for his grief was the Bible, and he was surprised by what he found there. Luke discovered that the authors of the Bible, like him, were people who had struggled with real doubts and pain. He found that he was learning far more about God in his sorrow than in times of joy. And he unlearned many of the wrong assumptions he had about God, especially as he focused his attention on Psalm 103.

 None of the things I learned dispelled my sorrow, Luke explains. This book is not about how I got through grief This book is about how I came to know God better, not just despite my loss, but because of it. Its written in the hope that the things I learned and the comfort I experienced will be of help in your life as well.

 Luke Veldts book is unique. It is the honest expression of his grief and doubts with nothing watered down or hidden in euphemisms. This experience is not presented in a preachy manner but as a pilgrim discovering the adequacy of Gods grace. Many books written by mourners for other mourners are often too sentimental too sermonic, or too idealistic. Luke has avoided these extremes and kept a balanced approach. Warren W. Wiersbe

 


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Customer Reviews

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It's a powerful little book and one I am glad to commend to you.
Tim Challies
Whether it be a loss of a loved or some other loss, the author will help you navigate through your grief and come out the other side.
Patti Chadwick
I have nothing to change in Veldt's outstanding book which can be read in one long sitting.
James H. Nelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James H. Nelson on December 14, 2010
Format: Paperback
This slender, well-written, and intense book centers on the sudden, unexpected death at home of a vibrant 13 year old girl who had participated in a five mile race the week before. This is also a meditation in the context of David's grieving for his son in Psalm 103.

As a physician who has been directly involved for four decades in so much death, life, developmental disabilities, and the need to correctly provide helpful counsel and comfort to families, friends, and fellow caregivers, I recommend this book highly. Two of the book's chapters: 8. Comforting the Suffering: Vacant Chaff Well Meant for Grain and 9. Developing Roots: Down Syndrome and Scars in Heaven are essential reading for pediatricians, neonatologists, oncologists, and grieving parents, Christians and non-Christians alike.

This book is written from the heart of an author who has a child with Down Syndrome and the brain of a man whose education, marriage to an equally talented wife,and diverse talents and life experiences could have made him very wealthy and a name in this materialistic world. He and his wife chose six children and the mission field. Veldt's personal background on the back of the book deserves at least two more sentences to gain more readers. He is too modest. Allison deserves name credit for her picture on the cover of the book. An old picture of the whole family including Allison could be included in a second edition.

I have nothing to change in Veldt's outstanding book which can be read in one long sitting. As one highly influenced by Dr. Kubler-Ross's ON DEATH AND DYING masterpiece, I note Veldt's coping mechanisms in his book which I will digest and consider over many more hours.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Miriam from Wheels Have Eyes on October 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
I cannot imagine the grief a parent must feel when losing a child. In Written in Tears, Luke Veldt shares honest and genuine feelings that he had after the death of his 13 year old daughter, Allison. Allison died due to a brain hemorrhage, so the family experienced many mixed feeling as to the reasons for her death. The author found comfort in reading Psalm 103 daily for the first year after his daughter's death. He shares his new found lessons from these words of David. He doesn't claim to have all the answers or the words of comfort to be used at these times, but he share his sincere feelings as he continues on his life journey. The author himself is a missionary living with his family in Spain. This experience cause him to reevaluate his beliefs about God when these things happen in our lives. The experience drew him closer to God and he shares his revelations with you in this book. Never having had the experience of losing a child, I cannot comment as to whether this book may be helpful to those who have, however I can say that Luke Veldt is very open with his thoughts and feelings and I appreciate his honesty in telling his story.
I received this free book for review from Discovery House Publishers. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review. The opinions of this review are strictly my own and not influenced in any way.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Strader on October 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
After the death of his thirteen year old daughter, Allison, Luke Veldt was looking for answers. He found a commiserating voice in Psalm 103. For over a year he read Psalm 103 every day, finding truths he had not seen before.

Written in Tears is a very good book, but probably not what you expect. There are stories about Allison, but it is not about her. It is written from the perspective of a grieving father, but it is not about getting through grief. Instead, as the author says, "this book is about how I came to know God better, not just despite my loss, but because of it." He writes about Psalm 103 with a different perspective than many commentators. Instead of a song of utter joy, he sees it as a psalm written by a grieving father, suggesting that perhaps David wrote it after the death of his son Absolom. He also shares thoughts on heaven, Down Syndrome (his youngest daughter is affected by it), and the continuing struggle to deal with the loss of their child. Through it all he speaks of knowing God better, and of comfort in the midst of pain.

I highly recommend this book for those grieving, especially those who have lost a child. But even as one who has not experienced the kind of pain the author has, I found the chapter on comforting those who are suffering to be very helpful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By MIRIAM VELDT on October 10, 2010
Format: Paperback
If you have ever lost anyone or felt a great loss in an experience, this book will help you navigate the cliches and come to a point of being able to live with the sorrow. This book is for religious and not, old, young, educated and not, and everyone else, too. Although not a thick book, it will take you time to get through it as you ponder the revelations and also cry a few tears yourself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tim Challies TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
Sunday, August 27, 2006, the sun beats down steadily but not oppressively on the streets of Pamplona. It's a lazy Sunday afternoon in Spain, the kind of day siestas were made for.

The traffic on the streets--if you can call the occasional car "traffic"--is also lazy, relaxed and unhurried, with one exception. A silver van speeds down the avenue, pausing only briefly before shooting through a red light.

In the back of the van a young girl is spread out across the seat, her head cradled in her mother's arms. "I need you to breathe, Allison!" the woman says. "Keep breathing!" But Allison is breathing, the deep breathing that's past sleep, the coma from which she will not wake up. Or perhaps she has already awakened; perhaps, somewhere between the house and the hospital, her soul slipped away from the presence of her panicked parents and into the calm presence of her Father.

The sun shines on a lazy afternoon in Pamplona as the girl's parents speed down the road toward the end of their world.

So begins Luke Veldt's Written in Tears. That young girl was Allison Veldt, Luke's thirteen year-old daughter. This book is a journey through the aftermath of that sudden, shocking, unexpected death. Left reeling after Allison died, Veldt found himself looking for answers and for comfort in the words of the Bible. Despite being a pastor and church planter, a man who knows his Bible well, he was still surprised by what he found in God's Word. As he says in the opening pages of his book, "It took the death of my daughter for me to begin to understand the love of God."

After Allison's death, Veldt turned to Psalm 103 and he read it again and again. He read it every day for more than a year. And through that psalm he experienced God's presence.
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