Written in Time
Format: Mass Market PaperbackChange
Price:$7.19+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon December 5, 2010
How many times must you repeat yourself? After the 14th description of Ellen as looking 12 years younger than she was and beautiful and with model worthy cheekbones...I don't need to imagine a picture of her anymore. Also, if Lizzie is such an intelligent, dynamic, and resourceful young woman, why is she and her side of the family never mentioned in the future... Last but not least, NONE OF THE GOOD GUYS DIE!!!! I don't normally have a death-wish for characters, but with all of the gun battles and heroics; the sheer carnage wrought in the final battle...none of the named main characters die (I don't count the old lady as she was a minor character of advanced age). Heck, none of them even get seriously injured; no permanent injuries, no lasting trauma.

I don't expect realism in my fiction, but I find it hard to stretch my credulity quite that far. When you add in redundant dialogue and rapid shifts in perspective - to allow for plenty of internal monologuing - it is difficult to push through to the end.

I still enjoyed some of the more active sequences and the authors built a very complete world, I just wouldn't highly recommend this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2010
This book covers no new ground. The "laws of time travel" and physics used are OK and don't have to be original to support a good story. The book reads like a Tom Swift novel, written for teens. That's also OK, but the dialog is mediocre to poor. I'm a sucker for parallel worlds and time travel fiction, so on my 10 scale this gets a 3 to 4.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on October 27, 2010
Written in Time (2010) is a standalone SF novel. It is about a family that travels back into time. It is set in three eras and three states.

In this novel, Jack Naile was born in Chicago and moved to Northeast Georgia when their daughter Elizabeth was two years old.

Ellen Naile is Jack's wife. She too was born in Chicago and gave birth to both David and Elizabeth in that city.

James Naile is the son of David and is married to Mary Ann. He is the CEO of Horizon Industries. He lives in Central Wisconsin.

John Naile is the son of James and is married to Audrey. He is vice president of Horizon Industries.

In this story, John and Audrey are visiting his family. Neither are sure why they have been invited this time, with all the work that John has piled on his desk. But they are always willing to spend time with his parents.

James and Mary Ann have a special reason for the invitation. She takes Audrey into the kitchen to help prepare lunch. He leads John to the family bomb shelter.

John is aware of the three floor shelter, but James shows him a fourth level. Within the hidden area, James shows him some information that comes from the future and tells him that Jack and his family had gone through time. Then he goes to the television.

John wonders why they are watching As the World Turns, but the program is interrupted to announce the assassination of President Kennedy. James explains the circumstances and consequences of the assassination and other future events. Then they discuss the ethics of withholding such information from the authorities.

In 1993, Jack receives a copy of a 1903 magazine photograph showing a general store in Northern Nevada with the name Jack Naile on the sign. Jack and Ellen are intrigued, but decide that they are many ways that the photo could have appeared. Maybe just a coincidence or possibly a fake.

Jack checks with the town Chamber of Commerce and discovers the name of the local historian. The man is out of the office the first time he calls, but is available later. After discussing the name issue, Jack asks the man to send some other material, including old photos.

In the photos of the western family, the similarity to Jack and his family is obvious. In fact, the Jack Naile in one photo is wearing the hat and pistol belt that is hanging in their hallway. David refuses to believe that they could have traveled back in time, but the rest of the family is beginning to wonder how it could be done.

Jack starts talking about what to take on their time voyage. Ellen is still upset, but helps him with the lists. David is still against the whole idea, but he hedges his bets and makes sure that they have everything that they would need.

Since they have no way of knowing when the time transition will occur, Jack always carries an attache case with gold, diamonds, microfiche and a small pistol. They pack the rest of their supplies into the Suburban. Whenever they travel together, the family takes these supplies with them

This tale takes Jack and his family back in time to 1896. They arrive near Atlas, Nevada, but the transition doesn't include the Suburban. So they have only the most crucial supplies. They start returning to the future the hard way, one day at a time.

A great deal of this novel is autobiographical. For example, the Aherns have written numerous books and articles on guns and other weapons (see Armed for Personal Defenses). Insofar as I am aware, however, they have not done any traveling in time except in the old fashioned way.

This plot reflects some of the time travel tales of the Golden Age, such as Lest Darkness Fall,The Door into Summer, and The End of Eternity. Yet the story differs in many respects from these classical tales. In this tale, they have time to plan for the trip, are able to carry some critical supplies, but are not experienced time travelers.

This novel puts a new twist on the old concept. Moreover, it delves into the philosophy of time travel. They learn that the Jack Naile in the past came from a future different than their own. Apparently these changes created differences without eliminating the time trip itself.

This novel raises some interesting questions. Try to avoid thinking too much on the issues. Read and enjoy!

Recommended for Ahern fans and for anyone else who enjoys tales of time travel, cultural changes, and plucky families.

-Arthur W. Jordin
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2011
This is one of the worst books in the genre that I have ever encountered. Don't let that turn you off; you'll have a good time reading this book.

I hope that the family in this book is not based upon the authors' own. If it is, I hope to never encounter them in real life, as they are among the most ignorant people imaginable. The plot begins with the main character receiving a photograph that appears to be his family in the old west. Instead of seriously questioning the origin of the photo, they simply accept the fact that they will somehow be sent back through time and begin preparing for it.

I will not spoil any more of the plot. I will say, however, that it is full of wallbangers and that the dialogue is absolutely terrible. The adventure is worth it if you can suffer through the writing.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on November 18, 2010
This book was a good way to get through a few hours. There's nothing original in it; it covers most of the old time-travel tropes that have been done in the past. Do note, as others have said, the authors are not shy about their right-wing politics, so if that bothers you, stay away. Also, they pretty much fetishize guns and smoking in here, which was the part that got in the way of my enjoying it more.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 6, 2014
I enjoy reading Jerry Ahern's work. He is a very good writer and this book disappointed me in only 1 way, there will not be a sequel because the author died of cancer. The author has written about survivalism and firearms for years. I thought the choice of weapons for the family were good ones for what they anticipated in encountering, a time shift. I found myself wondering what and how would my family prepare for a situation like this. I thought the choice of using diamonds as a light weight way to transport wealth was an interesting idea. While reading about their first days back in time I thought they were being had with the prices people were charging them. Maybe they didn't realize they should try to barter it down or they were just trying to make a good impression on people they knew they would live with for the rest of their lives. At the end of the story I was left with 2 questions, who sent the article to the Naile family and why did Beth Kaminsky hate the Naile family so much? But just like real life you don't always get an answer. If you like Ahern's work or prepping/survivalism this is a good work of fiction for you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 2, 2014
Jerry and Sharon Ahern have done it again with an unexpected Sci-fi survival novel. Great read as always. Real failings of the heros that they have to overcome.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on September 26, 2013
I really wanted to like this book, but by the time I finished it I was extremely frustrated with the author. First things first, I really liked the main characters in the book, they were well developed and believable. Secondly, the story was extremely interesting and not overly burdened with technical mumbo jumbo. I did NOT find it full of right wing, wacko conservative ideology or gun toting over the top NRA marketing as others have stated. Now for the bad news......PLOT HOLES!!! (a big deal is made about Ellen not being in the picture and finally when the picture is taken, she is in it and NOTHING is said about it) I found myself having to go back and reread certain parts because I thought I must have missed something only to realize it was another plot hole (I still haven't figured out the electrical outlet box David found or the "mystery" of the Seacamp 32). The prologue is a nice touch but never mentioned again. And last but not least......the ending, if you can call it that! Seriously, what a complete let down. You spend the last 250 pages building up to nothing. Overall it was a great idea that was poorly executed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 21, 2013
I was a huge Jerry Ahern fan in the 1980's and loved the Survivalist and Defender series. I was so excited to see the Aherns were releasing a new book and bought it from a local bookstore as soon as it was available. Unfortunately the book falls short on most of my expectations. As the story takes place in 1993 I believe this book was written in the late 80's or erly 90's and just published in late 2010. The thing I really liked about Ahern's writing was he was always technically correct when it came to firearms, gear, and knives. Thankfully that was still consistent thru the storyline. Unfortunately, a lot has changed in the almost 30 yrs since he retired from writing. Although the old west firearms are correct everything else modern is dated. This is where most of my negative impressions come from as the book is quite dated and musty for a recently released sifi novel. The book also has a rushed first draft feel to it and could have used some agressive editing to make the story flow better. If you liked Ahern's early stuff this book still has that feel but it just doesnt work for some reason.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 24, 2011
I can't imagine a reason for "Written in Time" by Jerry and Sharon Ahern to exist. Other than their obvious love for their own childish writing talent and the demand publishers are making these days for a "series," rather than publishing a book for its own merits alone.

The book starts with a confused collection of dialogue and overly detailed descriptions of a family we never really get to know and their unique ability to move through time both backward and forward. "But you can't tell anyone," says the patriarch who has amassed a considerable fortune by being privy to events in the future as he reveals the secret to his son. Then we flash off to a later -- or is it earlier -- generation who just happen to be a husband and wife writing team who just happen to be so hip they just have to hop.

Look elsewhere for something to read. This one isn't worth your money or your time.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.