Wrong Way Up

July 15, 2013 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 15, 2013
  • Label: All Saints Records
  • Copyright: 2013 All Saints Records
  • Total Length: 41:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00H89OBH4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #60,770 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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See all 52 customer reviews
It has one of the best lyrics I have ever heard.
Nik Allday
This cd showcases wonderfully the very idiosyncratic, yet very catchy, pop sensibilities of Mssrs.
Sean M. Kelly
You may think you sound great but you're wasted, dude.
S. Nyland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 18, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I'm somewhat ashamed that I only recently discovered this album for the first time. I've long liked and frequently adored John Cale and always loved Brian Eno, so I can't explain why this collaboration between the two of them didn't grab me when this first came out. My only excuse is that there are only so many hours in the day and so many days in the week. A few gems are always going to slip one by.

This album is somewhat surprising when given the pairing of Eno and Cale. Though neither is always inaccessible and both have at times produced some music that is almost popular in approach, who would have imagined that the two together would have brought out their purest pop tendencies? There is nothing here that smacks of difficult or avant-garde. This isn't Top 40 pop, but it is wonderfully accessible stuff, as if their intent is to delight the most resistant hearer. Not that it is musically simplistic. Far from it. One just has to pay some attention to the wonderfully contrapuntal rhythms interlacing "Spinning Away" to understand that these are masterful musicians. Both performers have done better work than this, but neither has done so frequently. I'd rank this near the best work that either has done. For Cale, I'd put this slightly behind such albums as PARIS 1919, VINTAGE VIOLENCE, HELEN OF TROY, and SLOW DAZZLE, while it is very nearly as good as Eno's four vocal albums (TAKING TIGER MOUNTAIN BY STRATEGY, HERE COME THE WARM JETS, ANOTHER GREEN WORLD, and BEFORE AND AFTER SCIENCE) and his collaboration with David Byrne, MY LIFE IN THE BUSH OF GHOSTS. I can't imagine a fan of Cale or of the vocal work of Eno (some who are exclusively ambient fans may feel differently) not almost instantly adoring this album.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on September 8, 2005
Format: Audio CD
1990's "Wrong Way Up", a collaboration between Brian Eno and John Cale, is highly regarded by fans of both men and with good reason. Cale had a series of inconsistent albums over the previous decade and Eno had all but abandoned vocal music. Some collaborations prove to be more than the sum of its parts-- this is one.

More or less, the album runs through modernizations of pop forms, from a sort of modern version of "Another Green World" ("One Word") to a Phil Spectorish sound (the stunning "Empty Frame"-- check Cale's positively bouncey vocal on it matched against Eno's stunning choruses) to a nice electronic variant of a jangle alt-rock sound ("Spinning Away", featuring a superb sensitive vocal from Eno). Along the way, there's at least one complete masterpiece (achingly beautiful "Cordoba") and enough good stuff to keep your interest sustained.

This reissue provides a much needed sonic update-- the music is in your face, loud but not distorted, and reveals all sorts of unheard subtleties in the music. It's wrapped in a new cover and adds two bonus tracks-- originally b-sides if I'm not mistaken. The instrumental "Palanquin" sounds more like a demo than an actual song, but "You Don't Miss the Water", an Eno/Lanois collaboration without any input from Cale is a stunning piece, an almost Eno does folky country sort of stuff that really needs to be heard.

All in all, a worthwhile update of a great album. Highly recommended.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAME on June 29, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Even after 10 years I'm still discovering new delights in this masterpiece. It transports me to ecstacy every time, from the opener Lay My Love (Eno vocal) through One Word (shared vocal)to the elegant Cordoba. The backing is superb (think Peter Baumann, Kraftwerk & the most melodic Suicide). Crime In The Desert has an almost West Coast feel with decorous harmonies and delectable doo-doo-doo's while The River sounds like classy country music. Every track is great: In The Backroom and Empty Frame confirm the artists' lyrical genius while Been There Done That and Spinning Away are distinguished by Cale's trademark viola. A truly inspired display of excellence. Much better than Songs For Drella and on a par with the brilliant Last Day On Earth, Cale's collaboration with Bob Neuwerth.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By DAC Crowell on April 4, 2000
Format: Audio CD
You could never accuse either John Cale nor Brian Eno of not having a pop sensibility. Granted, in both cases that sensibility is very idiosyncratic and very personal, but coming together as they've done on this release, the results are so wonderful. This contains perhaps the best 'sing-along' Eno material since "Taking Tiger Mountain", and Cale's presence here is certainly well-felt, with such delights as "In the Backroom" and "Cordoba". Granted, the cerebral atmosphere of Eno releases from around the same period isn't quite as in evidence here, but Eno did admit that part of what got him back into the mood to do vocal material again was singing along with gospel records (Al Green, et al), where he decided his voice actually _did_ sound good to him again. So one does have to kind of view this release as 'one for fun', but it appears to be the sort of fun everyone can get a piece of. And to say the least, this also sees John Cale back on a level that he's not hit since the mid-late 70s. Definitely recommended.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Niedt on February 23, 2006
Format: Audio CD
It's good to see this forgotten classic re-issued, with some fine remastering and two bonus tracks. Both these guys brought a lot of talent to the table: Cale as an original member of the seminal-punk band Velvet Underground; Eno as producer-extraordinaire and pioneering ambient music composer. This collaboration (their only one as a performing duo, to my knowledge) came as close to pop perfection as anyone could expect. Recorded on the cusp of the 80's and 90's, it still has some of the former decade's trademarks: heavy on the synths and pop sensibilities. But there are some truly great songs contained here. "Been There Done That" should have been a big hit, with one of the most singable hooks ever. The melodic development of "Spinning Away" fits the lyrics perfectly, with its unfolding cosmic point-of-view. (If I produced rock videos, I would have loved to do a line-drawing-animation of this one, with the artist-narrator of the song orbiting into space). "Cordoba" is a beautiful little ballad with a surprise bit of dissonance. "One Word" and "Lay My Love" are also really fine, rhythmically-driven songs. If there's any weak link, it's in their singing, though when they really click with their harmonizing, it's pretty sublime. The bonus tracks, "You Don't Miss Your Water" (a rather somnambulant treatment of an old blues standard) and the instrumental "Palanquin" (not "Grandfather's House", as shown on the Amazon track listing), are interesting additions, but not quite up to par with the original tracks. Another reviewer said this album is an example of "the whole equalling more than the sum of the parts", and I agree - not that the "parts" themselves are too shabby, mind you. But this CD ranks with the best work either artist has ever done.
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